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What Is Unity 3D | Ưu Điểm Của Unity 3D

What is unity used for

Frequently asked questions

Individuals, hobbyists, and small businesses using Unity to provide services to others are eligible to use Unity Personal if their respective clients, in the aggregate, have less than $100K of revenue or funds raised in the prior 12 months.

Individuals, hobbyists, and small businesses using Unity but not providing services to a third party are eligible to use Unity Personal if (i) for small businesses, if their aggregate gross revenue and funding are less than $100K, or (ii) for individuals and hobbyists if the amount generated in connection with their use of Unity is less than $100K.

Students enrolled in an accredited educational institution of legal age to consent to the collection and processing of their personal information (e.g., age 13 in the U.S., 16 in the E.U.) are eligible to use the free Unity Student plan.

Unity Pro or Unity Enterprise plans are required for businesses with revenue or funding greater than $200K in the last 12 months, and for those who do work with them. Pro and Enterprise plans have no financial eligibility limits – everyone is eligible. Please note that the Enterprise plan is for larger teams and requires a minimum purchase of 20 seats.

Unity Industry plan is required if you create applications outside of games or entertainment and your company’s total finances exceed US$1,000,000. Unity Industry’s features, add-ons, onboarding, and support options are tailored to your needs.

All plans are subject to Unity Terms of Service.

If you create industry applications (defined as any application outside of games or entertainment), and your company’s total finances exceed US$1,000,000, you are required to use Unity Industry. Industry customers may only use Unity Pro or Unity Enterprise if your total finances do not exceed US$1,000,000. Industry customers may not use Unity Personal.

For more details, see our Editor Terms of Service FAQ.

Unity Pro, Enterprise, and Industry subscription plans all include the core Unity real-time development platform, continuous updates, beta access, and more.

Compare plans to see the different features, resources, services, and options you can get with each plan, and to determine your eligibility.

If you purchased Unity Pro online, you can upgrade your Pro subscription to Unity Industry via your Unity ID. For more information, please see the Knowledge Base article: How do I upgrade from Unity Pro to Unity Industry?

If you purchased Unity Pro through your client partner, please contact Sales to upgrade your Unity Pro licenses to Unity Industry.

Yes, floating licensing is available exclusively for Enterprise subscribers. If you are interested in shared licensing options for pools of users, please contact Unity Sales.

Yes. You created it, so you own it.

We accept the following payment methods:

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To pay by invoice, please contact a Unity Sales representative.

Technical support is included with Enterprise subscriptions purchased online. If you are interested in other custom solutions, including technical support for Pro plan subscribers, please contact Unity Sales.

No, you must choose one plan type. Mixing between Pro and Enterprise plans is not permitted.

No, you cannot downgrade to a lower plan during your commitment period. You can upgrade to a higher plan within your commitment period, however you cannot reduce the number of seats if you upgrade.

There is no cancellation policy or reimbursement for a subscription. Once you commit to a subscription you are obligated to pay all monthly payments owing. Even if you stop your monthly payments and your license is shut down, you are still obligated to pay the outstanding payment(s) for your subscription period. Please see Subscription terms and conditions and the Software License Agreement for more details.

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What is unity used for
What is unity used for

Usage

Video games

The engine is used in games including Pokémon Go, Monument Valley, Call of Duty: Mobile, Beat Saber and Cuphead according to the Financial Times.[116]

As of 2018[update], Unity had been used to create approximately half of the mobile games on the market and 60 percent of augmented reality and virtual reality content,[117] including approximately 90 percent on emerging augmented reality platforms, such as Microsoft HoloLens, and 90 percent of Samsung Gear VR content.[95] Unity technology is the basis for most virtual reality and augmented reality experiences, and Fortune said Unity “dominates the virtual reality business”.[118][119][120] Unity Machine Learning Agents is open-source software whereby the Unity platform connects to machine learning programs, including Google’s TensorFlow.[121] Using trial and error in Unity Machine Learning Agents, virtual characters use reinforcement learning to build creative strategies in lifelike virtual landscapes.[121] The software is used to develop robots and self-driving cars.[121]

Non-gaming industries

In the 2010s, Unity Technologies used its game engine to transition into other industries using the real-time 3D platform, including film and automotive.[122][123] Unity first experimented in filmmaking with Adam, a short film about a robot escaping from prison. Later, Unity partnered with filmmaker Neill Blomkamp, whose Oats Studios used the engine’s tools, including real-time rendering and Cinemachine, to create two computer-generated short films, Adam: The Mirror and Adam: The Prophet.[122] At the 2017 Unite Europe conference in Amsterdam, Unity focused on filmmaking with Unity 2017.1’s new Cinemachine tool.[59] In 2018, Disney Television Animation launched three shorts, called Baymax Dreams, that were created using the Unity engine.[124] The Unity engine was also used by Disney to create backgrounds for the 2019 film The Lion King.[125]

Automakers use Unity’s technology to create full-scale models of new vehicles in virtual reality, build virtual assembly lines, and train workers.[123] Unity’s engine is used by DeepMind, an Alphabet Inc. company, to train artificial intelligence.[126] Other uses being pursued by Unity Technologies include architecture, engineering, and construction.[127]

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Unity 3D is a powerful game development engine that creates some of the world’s most popular video games. Unity 3D allows developers to develop games for various platforms, including PC, Mac, iOS, Android, and more. Unity 3D is also used for architectural visualizations, training simulations, and other types of interactive media. In the section below, we will discuss the use of Unity 3D and its pros & cons.

Let’s get started..

Unity is the most widely used gaming engine in the world. It is adaptable enough to produce virtually any game you can think of, and it bundles a host of features altogether.

Unity is well-liked by both indie developers as well as AAA studios due to its unmatched cross-platform functionality. Games including, Hearthstone, Rimworld, Pokemon Go, Cuphead, and many others have been made using Unity.

Despite having “3D” in its moniker, Unity 3D includes tools for creating 2D video games.

Its built-in connectivity with Visual Studio and C# scripting API makes it a favorite among programmers. Unity also offers JavaScript as a scripting language and Mono Develop as an IDE for anyone searching for a replacement to Visual Studio.

However, because it has robust animation features that make it easy to produce your 3D sequences or make 2D visuals from scratch, professionals also adore it. Almost any object can be animated with Unity.

Moreover, Unity 3D provides a free edition so that creators may publish games created with as long as these games bring in less than $100,000 in income, Unity Personal can be used without paying for the programming.

Unity is free! Well, nearly. A Pro edition is available with more features and functionality, but it costs $1,500. This pricing is actually fairly affordable given the feature set and how flexible the Unity publishing license is. But with the free version, you may test the waters, create whole games, and even release them for free on PC and the internet! The free version games will feature a little Unity watermark as the only restriction.

Everything created in Unity will function identically in Unity Pro. This implies that you have the option to upgrade if you require the extra functionality or wish to publish to new platforms, including iOS and Android. You also can enroll in a free 30-day Pro trial to try out all the additional features!

S.No Pros Cons
1. To begin with, Unity is a great all-around engine that can meet the demands of practically everybody. Additionally, Unity is amazing for game prototyping. Unity is more clunky than engines that place a higher priority because of its multipurpose approach.
2. Reusing code and components from previous projects & editing them for new uses is simple using the prefab system. While Godot and Unreal have powerful rendering as well as lighting technologies, Unity makes it more difficult to create 2D games.
3. Making complicated settings in Unity 3D requires building several other components. Unity also turns off features for users who refuse to pay for the premium edition. Since most people won’t have the code, Unity will appear to be a mysterious entity.
4. The extensive collection of resources that are accessible to everyone is the crucial argument in favor of Unity. Even seasoned developers can benefit greatly from the community’s time savings and knowledge. In regard to gaming engines, Unity 3D is of large size
5. Additionally, Unity provides a complete set of cloud-based technologies that make it simple to monetize your gameplay and add multiplayer features. Because of all the baggage that comes with utilising an engine like Unity, perhaps a blank project will frequently be bigger than certain games. You might want to seek elsewhere if you’re searching for something slim and mean.
6. Users can access an exceptionally inventive library of tools for making interactive games in one location, with Unity Collaborate, Unity Ads, Unity Analytics, and Unity Multiplayer. Only a few different game engines offer this kind of centralization. Another significant drawback is that Unity’s licensing scheme might be perplexing.

The Unity 3D window is composed of small individual panes that may be docked back into the main window, moved about, grouped in sets, and disconnected from one spot. This demonstrates how the editor’s look may vary from programmer to programmer and from project to project.

It will show you the collection of resources that are accessible for usage as well as the graphics, music, as well as other files you’ll utilize in your project. Whenever you import assets into your project, they show up in this area.

It gives programmers the opportunity to visually navigate and alter the scenario you are building. Depending on the sort of project you are working on, this view can provide a 2D or 3D view. The objects in this view may be moved to the ideal positions.

The Unity Editor’s most crucial window is this one. It will have the main tools for manipulating the scene view and the items inside on the left. This Window will also include play, resume, and step controls. The icons on the right-hand side also allow access to the Unity Cloud Services, the visibility menu, Unity Account and the editor layout menu, which will enable some other layouts for editor windows.

We consider Unity to be a great engine. Although it’s not the finest, it’s a fantastic, all-purpose tool that’s great for novices. For the work, there are just tools. Some are superior to others, and it actually depends on what each project requires. While coding knowledge is required to fully utilise Unity, there really are tools available to teach you anything you choose.

Regardless of whether Unity is the best engine for your project, understanding it can only advance your career as a game developer. Pick Unity if you’re a complete newbie since the community will assist you in learning and the tools will be enough for a long time.

In the Valley of Gods

Unity in 100 Seconds
Unity in 100 Seconds

Licensing

During its first ten years as a product, the paid versions of Unity were sold outright; in 2016, the corporation changed to a subscription model.[89] Unity has free and paid licensing options. The free license is for personal use or smaller companies generating less than $100,000 annually, later raised to $200,000, and the subscriptions are based on revenues generated by the games using Unity.[95][63] The subscription-based versions also include additional features geared towards professional projects, including analytics, performance analysis and error reporting, and Cloud Build among others.[96]

The paid option, Unity Pro, had been required for developers that had over $200,000 in annual revenue, but this also could have been provided for console developers through a Preferred Platform License from the console manufacturer. The Unity Pro keys would have been part of the other SDK from the console manufacturer that the developer paid for. In May 2016, Unity released “Unity Plus”, a mid-range tier between Personal and Pro that provides tools and benefits oriented towards “first-time commercial developers”.[97]

In June 2021, Unity changed its licensing terms to require any developer making games on the closed console systems (PlayStation, Nintendo Switch, and Xbox) regardless of revenue to have a Unity Pro license or a Preferred Platform License Key from the manufacturers. Sony and Nintendo provide this as part of the SDK, but Microsoft had yet to implement this functionality for their SDK.[98] The engine source code is licensed on a “per-case basis via special arrangements”.[99]

Runtime fee

On September 12, 2023, Unity announced that use of the engine would become subject to royalties (referred to as a “runtime fee”) beginning in January 2024, calculated per-installation and charged monthly, if the product reaches specific revenue and lifetime installation thresholds. Unity states that monetizing the runtime in this manner is required to “allow creators to keep the ongoing financial gains from player engagement.”[100][101]

The new terms faced criticism from game developers who had been using Unity for years, particularly regarding how this fee would be calculated and enforced, and the implications for demos, freemium games and bundles distributed for charitable causes.[102][103][104] The change was considered to be contradictory to statements made by former CEO John Riccitiello in 2015 when Unity originally announced its shift to free and subscription-based models, stating that all users would “get the full power of Unity for free”, and that there would not be royalties (in contrast to Unreal Engine, which had recently switched to free distribution but with royalties paid above a specific revenue threshold).[105][96]

Unity subsequently issued a statement clarifying the definition of a chargeable “installation”, and announced that the fee would not apply to charity games or bundles.[106][107] Many indie developers, including Among Us developer Innersloth[108] and Slay the Spire developer Mega Crit,[109] announced that they would switch to other game engines.

An analysis by Ars Technica found that several older versions of Unity’s terms of service would allow developers to continue to release their software without having to pay the new fee, as long as they did not update their project after the January 1, 2024 date.[105] Ars Technica also discovered that Unity had apparently removed a GitHub repository that permitted developers to track changes in Unity’s terms of service;[105] Mega Crit accused Unity of having done so to apply their new financial model to games retroactively.[110][111] An analysis by Game Developer came to the conclusion that the changes were intended to encourage games with large install bases such as Genshin Impact, Subway Surfers and Hearthstone to migrate to Unity services in order to get a fee reduction. The article noted that the Operate Solutions division, handling in-app-purchase services for example, was far more profitable than the Create division, and added that “The many indie developers who will be left by the roadside are completely incidental to Unity’s goals, and are not going to be a significant factor in its future decision making.”[112] Gameindustry.biz described the move as “self-combustion” and identified the changes as an example of enshittification.[113]

In response to this negative feedback, Unity Technologies introduced revised runtime fee terms on September 22, 2023. These included removing any fees for uses of Unity Personal for projects funded up to $200,000 (an increase from the previous $100,000 threshold), fees would only apply to games developed with Unity 2024 and beyond without any retroactive fees, and the fee would be based on the lesser of 2.5% of monthly revenue or a calculated value based on monthly engagements, both which rely only on self-reporting of these numbers.[114][115]

The All-Important GameObject

Virtually everything in your scene is a GameObject. Think of System.Object in the .NET Framework. Almost all types derive from it. The same concept goes for GameObject. It’s the base class for all objects in your Unity scene. All of the objects shown in Figure 5 (and many more) derive from a GameObject.

Figure 5 GameObjects in Unity

A GameObject is pretty simple as it pertains to the Inspector window. You can see in Figure 6 that an empty GameObject was added to the scene; note its properties in the Inspector. GameObjects by default have no visual properties except the widget Unity shows when you highlight the object. At this point, it’s simply a fairly empty object.

Figure 6 A Simple GameObject

A GameObject has a Name, a Tag (similar to a text tag you’d assign via a FrameworkElement.Tag in XAML or a tag in Windows Forms), a Layer and the Transform (probably the most important property of all).

The Transform property is simply the position, rotation and scale of any GameObject. Unity uses the left-hand coordinate system, in which you think of the coordinates of your computer screen as X (horizontal), Y (vertical) and Z (depth, that is, coming in or going out of the screen).

In game development, it’s quite common to use vectors, which I’ll cover a bit more in future articles. For now, it’s sufficient to know that Transform.Position and Transform.Scale are both Vector3 objects. A Vector3 is simply a three-dimensional vector; in other words, it’s nothing more than three points—just X, Y and Z. Through these three simple values, you can set an object’s location and even move an object in the direction of a vector.

Unity vs Unreal: Which Engine Should You Choose As A Beginner
Unity vs Unreal: Which Engine Should You Choose As A Beginner

Features

Unity gives users the ability to create games and experiences in both 2D and 3D, and the engine offers a primary scripting API in C# using Mono, for both the Unity editor in the form of plugins, and games themselves, as well as drag and drop functionality.[50] Prior to C# being the primary programming language used for the engine, it previously supported Boo, which was removed with the release of Unity 5,[51] and a Boo-based implementation of JavaScript called UnityScript, which was deprecated in August 2017, after the release of Unity 2017.1, in favor of C#.[52][53]

Within 2D games, Unity allows importation of sprites and an advanced 2D world renderer. For 3D games, Unity allows specification of texture compression, mipmaps, and resolution settings for each platform that the game engine supports,[54] and provides support for bump mapping, reflection mapping, parallax mapping, screen space ambient occlusion (SSAO), dynamic shadows using shadow maps, render-to-texture and full-screen post-processing effects.[55]

Two separate render pipelines are available, High Definition Render Pipeline (HDRP) and Universal Render Pipeline (URP, previously LWRP), in addition to the legacy built-in pipeline.[56][57] All three render pipelines are incompatible with each other.[58] Unity offers a tool to upgrade shaders using the legacy renderer to URP or HDRP.

Creators can develop and sell user-generated assets to other game makers via the Unity Asset Store. This includes 3D and 2D assets and environments for developers to buy and sell.[59] Unity Asset Store launched in 2010. By 2018, there had been approximately 40 million downloads through the digital store.[60]

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The Unity Tutorial For Complete Beginners
The Unity Tutorial For Complete Beginners

Làm quen giao diện trước khi học Unity

Trước khi tiến hành học chuyên sâu một cách hiệu quả, việc cần làm đầu tiên là làm quen với giao diện của phần mềm.

  • Giao diện mặc định của Unity:
Giao diện làm việc của Unity 3D
  • Sau đây là một số điểm cơ bản cần chú ý trong giao diện chính của Unity.
  • Có 2 thẻ cần quan tâm trong Unity đó là:
Giao diện chính của Unity 3D
  • Thẻ Scene để thao tác :
  • Thẻ Game hiển thị giao diện game các bạn đang lập trình:
  • Play/Pause/Step : dùng để chạy thử game.
  • Assets : Chứa các tài nguyên để xây dựng game.
  • Inspector: Chứa các thuộc tính của từng đối tượng, mỗi đối tượng có các thuộc tính riêng.
  • Hierarchy: Chứa các đối tượng của game.

Nếu các bạn chọn Unity 3d sẽ có thêm :

  • Trục tọa độ.

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Ưu điểm của Unity 3D

Được coi là chìa khóa để phát triển phần mềm game, Unity 3D sở hữu nhiều ưu điểm.

Về quy mô sử dụng phần mềm.

Theo một số thống kê, hiện nay có tới 47% số các nhà phát triển game sử dụng Unity 3D. Nó đang được coi là nền tảng thiết kế game phổ biến nhất trên toàn thế giới.

Cộng đồng Unity rất lớn mạnh. Với quy mô trên toàn thế giới, cộng đồng designer được thành lập ở nhiều nơi. Trong đó chia sẻ các kiến thức và kinh nghiệm về Unity 3D. Nhờ đó, kho sưu tập tài nguyên hiệu ứng có thể dử dụng trong Unity 3D ngày càng trở nên phong phú, đa dạng,…

Chi phí sử dụng phần mềm.

Chính sách về chi phí của Unity được nới lỏng đến mức tối đa. Phần mềm được sử dụng miễn phí cho các cá nhân và doanh nghiệp có doanh thu thấp. Nếu muốn nâng cấp và sử dụng bản Pro, chi phí phải bỏ ra cũng rất nhỏ. Chỉ từ 1.500 USD cho một năm sử dụng Unity 3D.

Cách sử dụng phần mềm đơn giản.

Là một phần mềm lập trình đa nền tảng, có thể dử dụng trên nhiều thiết bị khác nhau. Unity 3D cung cấp một hệ thống toàn diện cho cả nhiệm vụ soạn thảo và sửa lỗi. Điều này giúp phần mềm lập trình này có thể tối ưu hóa mọi công việc cho lập trình viên. Vì vậy, Unity 3D đảm bảo dễ sử dụng cho cả newbie.

Nền tảng được phát triển liên tục, không ngừng nâng cấp phần mềm.

Phát triển Unity trong vòng 15 năm (từ năm 2015 đến nay). Unity Technologies đã liên tục cho ra đời các phiên bản khác nhau của Unity. Các phiên bản không ngừng được chú trọng phát triển tạo được những tính năng ấn tượng.

>>> Xem thêm : Học lập trình Android – 3 bí quyết giúp trở thành chuyên gia

Game development is HARD
Game development is HARD

Components

You add functionality to GameObjects by adding Components. Everything you add is a Component and they all show up in the Inspector window. There are MeshRender and SpriteRender Components; Components for audio and camera functionality; physics-related Components (colliders and rigidbodies), particle systems, path-finding systems, third-party custom Components, and more. You use a script Component to assign code to an object. Components are what bring your GameObjects to life by adding functionality, akin to thedecorator pattern in software development, only much cooler.

I’ll assign some code to a new GameObject, in this case a simple cube you can create via GameObject | Create Other | Cube. I renamed the cube Enemy and then created another to have two cubes. You can see in Figure 7 I moved one cube about -15 units away from the other, which you can do by using the move tool on the toolbar or the W key once an object is highlighted.

Figure 7 Current Project with Two Cubes

The code is a simple class that finds a player and moves its owner toward it. You typically do movement operations via one of two approaches: Either you move an object to a new position every frame by changing its Transform.Position properties, or you apply a physics force to it and let Unity take care of the rest.

Doing things per frame involves a slightly different way of thinking than saying “move to this point.” For this example, I’m going to move the object a little bit every frame so I have exact control over where it moves. If you’d rather not adjust every frame, there are libraries to do single function call movements, such as the freely available iTween library.

The first thing I do is right-click in the Project window to create a new C# script called EnemyAI. To assign this script to an object, I simply drag the script file from the project view to the object in the Scene view or the Hierarchy and the code is assigned to the object. Unity takes care of the rest. It’s that easy.

Figure 8 shows the Enemy cube with the script assigned to it.

Figure 8 The Enemy with a Script Assigned to It

Take a look at the code in Figure 9 and note the public variable. If you look in the Editor, you can see that my public variable appears with an option to override the default values at run time. This is pretty cool. You can change defaults in the GUI for primitive types, and you can also expose public variables (not properties, though) of many different object types. If I drag and drop this code onto another GameObject, a completely separate instance of that code component gets instantiated. This is a basic example and it can be made more efficient by, say, adding a RigidBody component to this object, but I’ll keep it simple here.

Figure 9 The EnemyAI Script


public class EnemyAI : MonoBehavior { // These values will appear in the editor, full properties will not. public float Speed = 50; private Transform _playerTransform; private Transform _ myTransform; // Called on startup of the GameObject it's assigned to. void Start() { // Find some gameobject that has the text tag "Player" assigned to it. // This is startup code, shouldn't query the player object every // frame. Store a ref to it. var player = GameObject.FindGameObjectWithTag("Player"); if (!player) { Debug.LogError( "Could not find the main player. Ensure it has the player tag set."); } else { // Grab a reference to its transform for use later (saves on managed // code to native code calls). _playerTransform = player.transform; } // Grab a reference to our transform for use later. _myTransform = this.transform; } // Called every frame. The frame rate varies every second. void Update() { // I am setting how fast I should move toward the "player" // per second. In Unity, one unit is a meter. // Time.deltaTime gives the amount of time since the last frame. // If you're running 60 FPS (frames per second) this is 1/60 = 0.0167, // so w/Speed=2 and frame rate of 60 FPS (frame rate always varies // per second), I have a movement amount of 2*0.0167 = .033 units // per frame. This is 2 units. var moveAmount = Speed * Time.deltaTime; // Update the position, move toward the player's position by moveAmount. _myTransform.position = Vector3.MoveTowards(_myTransform.position, _playerTransform.position, moveAmount); } }

In code, I can get a reference to any component exposed in the editor. I can also assign scripts to a GameObject, each with its own Start and Update methods (and many other methods). Assuming a script component containing this code needs a reference to the EnemyAI class (component), I can simply ask for that component:


public class EnemyHealth : MonoBehavior private EnemyAI _enemyAI; // Use this for initialization. void Start () { // Get a ref to the EnemyAI script component on this game object. var enemyAI = this.GetComponent

(); } // Update is called once per frame. void Update () { _enemyAI.MoveTowardsPlayer(); }

After you edit code in MonoDevelop or your code editor of choice and then switch back to Unity, you’ll typically notice a short delay. This is because Unity is background compiling your code. You can change your code editor (not debugger) via Edit | Preferences | External Tools | External Script Editor. Any compilation issues will show up at the very bottom status bar of your Unity Editor screen, so keep an eye out for them. If you try to run your game with errors in the code, Unity won’t let you continue.

Subscription plans

Personal

Bring your vision to life with free access to the most widely used game engine in the world.

Pro

Unlock your team’s potential with the tools professionals use to create hit games across devices and platforms.

Enterprise

Manage complex real-time 3D projects with expert support and creation tools that scale for teams of any size.

Disclaimers

  1. Creator credits: Bleak Sword DX, More8bit, Devolver Digital | GTFO, 10 Chambers | Laika: Aged Through Blood, Brainwash Gang, Headup Publishing | Muhammad Ali, Showmax Game Changers, Chocolate Tribe | Sea of Stars, Sabotage Studios | BattleBit Remastered, SgtOkiDoki, Vilaskis, TheLiquidHorse
  2. As of September 2023. Source: Derived from internal Unity resources.
  3. As of September 2023. Source: Internal Unity sources, Data.ai Steam DB. Disclaimer: Downloads number is a combined figure of 3.56 billion mobile downloads based on data.ai data plus an internal estimate of 98 million downloads based on Steam data.
  4. As of 2023-10-25. Source: Data.ai. Disclaimer: Top 100 games based on 7-day average of worldwide downloads, both on Apple App and Google Play Stores, as of September 19, 2023 from data.ai.

Unity 3D is a powerful game development engine that creates some of the world’s most popular video games. Unity 3D allows developers to develop games for various platforms, including PC, Mac, iOS, Android, and more. Unity 3D is also used for architectural visualizations, training simulations, and other types of interactive media. In the section below, we will discuss the use of Unity 3D and its pros & cons.

Let’s get started..

Unity is the most widely used gaming engine in the world. It is adaptable enough to produce virtually any game you can think of, and it bundles a host of features altogether.

Unity is well-liked by both indie developers as well as AAA studios due to its unmatched cross-platform functionality. Games including, Hearthstone, Rimworld, Pokemon Go, Cuphead, and many others have been made using Unity.

Despite having “3D” in its moniker, Unity 3D includes tools for creating 2D video games.

Its built-in connectivity with Visual Studio and C# scripting API makes it a favorite among programmers. Unity also offers JavaScript as a scripting language and Mono Develop as an IDE for anyone searching for a replacement to Visual Studio.

However, because it has robust animation features that make it easy to produce your 3D sequences or make 2D visuals from scratch, professionals also adore it. Almost any object can be animated with Unity.

Moreover, Unity 3D provides a free edition so that creators may publish games created with as long as these games bring in less than $100,000 in income, Unity Personal can be used without paying for the programming.

Unity is free! Well, nearly. A Pro edition is available with more features and functionality, but it costs $1,500. This pricing is actually fairly affordable given the feature set and how flexible the Unity publishing license is. But with the free version, you may test the waters, create whole games, and even release them for free on PC and the internet! The free version games will feature a little Unity watermark as the only restriction.

Everything created in Unity will function identically in Unity Pro. This implies that you have the option to upgrade if you require the extra functionality or wish to publish to new platforms, including iOS and Android. You also can enroll in a free 30-day Pro trial to try out all the additional features!

S.No Pros Cons
1. To begin with, Unity is a great all-around engine that can meet the demands of practically everybody. Additionally, Unity is amazing for game prototyping. Unity is more clunky than engines that place a higher priority because of its multipurpose approach.
2. Reusing code and components from previous projects & editing them for new uses is simple using the prefab system. While Godot and Unreal have powerful rendering as well as lighting technologies, Unity makes it more difficult to create 2D games.
3. Making complicated settings in Unity 3D requires building several other components. Unity also turns off features for users who refuse to pay for the premium edition. Since most people won’t have the code, Unity will appear to be a mysterious entity.
4. The extensive collection of resources that are accessible to everyone is the crucial argument in favor of Unity. Even seasoned developers can benefit greatly from the community’s time savings and knowledge. In regard to gaming engines, Unity 3D is of large size
5. Additionally, Unity provides a complete set of cloud-based technologies that make it simple to monetize your gameplay and add multiplayer features. Because of all the baggage that comes with utilising an engine like Unity, perhaps a blank project will frequently be bigger than certain games. You might want to seek elsewhere if you’re searching for something slim and mean.
6. Users can access an exceptionally inventive library of tools for making interactive games in one location, with Unity Collaborate, Unity Ads, Unity Analytics, and Unity Multiplayer. Only a few different game engines offer this kind of centralization. Another significant drawback is that Unity’s licensing scheme might be perplexing.

The Unity 3D window is composed of small individual panes that may be docked back into the main window, moved about, grouped in sets, and disconnected from one spot. This demonstrates how the editor’s look may vary from programmer to programmer and from project to project.

It will show you the collection of resources that are accessible for usage as well as the graphics, music, as well as other files you’ll utilize in your project. Whenever you import assets into your project, they show up in this area.

It gives programmers the opportunity to visually navigate and alter the scenario you are building. Depending on the sort of project you are working on, this view can provide a 2D or 3D view. The objects in this view may be moved to the ideal positions.

The Unity Editor’s most crucial window is this one. It will have the main tools for manipulating the scene view and the items inside on the left. This Window will also include play, resume, and step controls. The icons on the right-hand side also allow access to the Unity Cloud Services, the visibility menu, Unity Account and the editor layout menu, which will enable some other layouts for editor windows.

We consider Unity to be a great engine. Although it’s not the finest, it’s a fantastic, all-purpose tool that’s great for novices. For the work, there are just tools. Some are superior to others, and it actually depends on what each project requires. While coding knowledge is required to fully utilise Unity, there really are tools available to teach you anything you choose.

Regardless of whether Unity is the best engine for your project, understanding it can only advance your career as a game developer. Pick Unity if you’re a complete newbie since the community will assist you in learning and the tools will be enough for a long time.

Unity Industry for Design visualization

Unity Industry is a suite of products and support services for developers, artists, and engineers to build custom real-time 3D experiences for AR, VR, mobile, desktop, and web.

Discover how others are using Unity to address product visualization challenges across various industries.

MOST Valuable Companies in the World 2024 💵
MOST Valuable Companies in the World 2024 💵

Unity Gaming Services

Solve the challenges of building live games with tools for multiplayer services, game operations, user acquisition, and monetization.

Deliver performance and flexibility to your gaming infrastructure, speed up development time and provide the best experience to your players with dedicated multiplayer hosting for any game engine.

  • Automated orchestration fleet scaling
  • Integrates with any game engine

Tailor matches to your game and players with rules-based matchmaking, integrated with Game Server Hosting that delivers what matters most to players – low latency and fast matches.

  • Developer-configured match logic
  • Customizable evaluator and matchmaking loop

Networking libraries built for the Unity Engine. Dependable, customizable, and extensible to meet the needs of your next multiplayer project.

  • Extensible networking framework
  • Latency management

A service that allows players to connect and enjoy immersive multiplayer gaming – all without needing a dedicated game server.

  • P2P client server model
  • DTLS encryption

A flexible solution that connects players in custom private or public rooms to enable great multiplayer gaming experiences.

  • Custom lobby management
  • Quick join functionality

Flexible and easy-to-use, Cloud Save allows you to track and store player data like progression, abilities, and statistics to the cloud.

  • Off-device player data storage
  • Cross-device accounts

Authenticate your players with either anonymous, platform-specific or custom sign-in solutions.

  • Authenticate players with either anonymous or platform-specific sign-in
  • Make sure player progress is saved across different devices

Get three services in one: A content delivery network (CDN), cloud storage, and asset manager.

  • End-to-end live game updates
  • Cloud storage and asset management

Update your live game content, remotely and in real-time.

  • Dynamic configuration for content delivery
  • Real-time content tuning

Run your game logic in the cloud and interact with other backend services.

  • Write and run game logic away from the client
  • Streamline game code in the cloud

Analytics enables studios to understand game performance and player behaviors. Capture insights using prebuilt dashboards and visualizations powered by reliable, real-time data.

  • Game performance dashboards and dynamic reporting
  • Secured real-time data

Build communities with a scalable and cost-friendly communication solution that connects your players over distance and platform divides.

  • Real-time voice chat
  • Speech-to-text and text-to-speech technology

Connect players across platforms while building vibrant communities using a scalable and cost-friendly in-game text chat solution, powered by Vivox.

  • Large channel support
  • Adaptive chat filter

Manage your players’ safety with an end-to-end moderation platform that pairs integrated evidence from Safe Voice with the ability to take action and understand in-game community health.

  • Streamline incident management workflow
  • Understand player behavior patterns

Improve game stability by capturing and analyzing detailed crash data.

  • Error de-duplication to help prioritize issues
  • Workflow integrations to common engineering tools

Add a new social experience to your games by helping players connect with others across any platform.

  • Full feature friends solution: add, remove, block
  • Presence feature
  • Pairs with Lobby and Voice and Text Chat

Drive competition and engagement by giving your players the ability to compare their performance against each other.

  • Customizable sorting
  • Highly scalable
  • Pairs with Cloud code and Economy for rewarding functionality

Drive revenue from your game with ads and in-app advertising.

  • Diverse ad formats
  • Access to premium ad demand

Bidding and mediation solutions to drive more competition for your inventory.

  • Align pricing with formats and segments
  • Sell ad inventory to the highest bidder

Run ad campaigns to find the most valuable users to keep your game growing.

  • Reach millions of users every day
  • Optimize for a variety of campaign goals

Everything you need to design and plan your game economy. Tune and scale to build a better game for your players and grow in-game revenue.

  • Manage in-game currencies and inventories
  • Set up trading systems with real money and in-game currencies

Simplify in-app purchase set-up across multiple stores with this codeless IAP solution.

  • Workflows with Unity Analytics to understand purchase behavior
  • Works alongside Unity Ads and Economy to build a holistic monetization system

A suite of real-time 3D products and services to build custom applications for AR/VR, mobile, desktop, and web.

  • Build immersive experiences
  • Overcome roadblocks faster with premium technical support and professional training resources
  • Unlock the value of your CAD and 3D data
  • Build and deploy for Apple Vision Pro

Standalone tool for data preparation

  • Import/convert CAD, mesh, and point cloud data
  • Optimize/export data
  • Automate tasks via Python API

Unity plug-in for data import.

  • Import CAD/3D/BIM data to Unity
  • Preserve hierarchy and metadata
  • Automate scripts with rule engine

Tool for CAD review.

  • Drag and drop CAD, mesh or point clouds
  • One click to virtual reality
  • Study and interact with models

An on-premises licensing solution for offloading Unity project builds to network hardware.

  • On-prem solution to build Unity projects
  • License flexibility and built to scale
  • Maximize IT productivity

Run complex simulations at scale with a simulation-optimized version of the Unity runtime.

  • Headless and multi-GPU distributed rendering
  • Run on-premises or on private cloud

Subscribe to Unity Muse to access an ever-expanding suite of AI-powered features for accelerating game and real-time 3D development.

  • Generate art for commercial use
  • Get exclusive access to AI pre-releases

Create vegetation for every environment, quickly and intuitively.

  • Photogrammetry conversion for realistic, high-performance models
  • Intuitive editing tools for manual edits
  • Expertly researched, dynamic models in the SpeedTree Library

Powerful tools to bring top-quality characters to life for film, TV, and games.

  • Create realistic and scalable digital humans
  • Simulate soft-tissue materials and real-world physics
  • Use machine learning to turn offline assets into RT3D characters

The industry’s first and fastest unbiased, physically accurate GPU accelerated renderer.

  • Render for cinematic quality
  • VFX-quality shading and lighting in Unity
  • Ultra-fast AI denoising

Jump-start your game with time-saving assets and tools.

  • Over 11,000 five-star assets
  • Rated by 85,000+ customers
  • Supported by 100,000+ forum members

Subscribe to Unity Muse to access an ever-expanding suite of AI-powered features for accelerating game and real-time 3D development.

  • Generate art for commercial use
  • Get exclusive access to AI pre-releases

An ecosystem of products and services that makes work on games and real-time 3D experiences more creator-focused, accessible, and connected.

  • Unity Asset Manager and storage
  • Unity DevOps
  • Team Administration capabilities
  • Unity ecosystem integrations

Increase content discoverability, reuse, security, and ROI across your studio with Unity’s robust cloud-based 3D asset management solution.

  • Browse assets in one central ecosystem
  • Support for multiple file types
  • API and integrations with Unity tools
  • Lifecycle management and role-based permissions

Iterate with agility for higher quality release using DevOps tools specifically built for the rigors of game development.

  • Scales with large files
  • Role-specific UX for both developers and artists
  • Deep integration with Unity and Unreal

Các khoá học lập trình game Unity

Để dễ dàng hơn trên con đường trở thành một lập trình game chuyên nghiệp với Unity. Một số gợi ý sau đây có thể sẽ giúp bạn. Đây là những khóa học tốt nhất sắp xếp theo mức độ hài lòng của học viên:

Teky

  • Tự hào là trung tâm đào tạo theo chương trình giảng dạy Steam đầu tiên tại Việt Nam theo tiêu chuẩn Mĩ. Teky hướng đến các đối tượng học viên là trẻ em. Những học sinh có độ tuổi từ 4 – 18 tuổi.
  • Môi trường và chương trình đào tạo ở Teky được xây dựng một cách bài bản. Có kế hoạch, đảm bảo học viên sẽ nhận được một tiến trình học tập rõ ràng.
  • Ngoài việc cung cấp các kiến thức nền tảng, Teky hướng học viên đến việc khai phá các ý tưởng. Đề cao yếu tố sáng tạo, kích thích tư duy của trẻ nhỏ, Với Unity 3D, Teky cam kết giúp trẻ phát huy tối đa khả năng tư duy. Đào tạo cho trẻ nhiều vấn đề liên quan như viết lệnh, đóng gói, chạy thử,…
  • Khóa học này sẽ giúp trẻ tạo nên sản phẩm là những trò chơi đồ họa 3D thú vị.

Khoa Pham.vn

  • Đây là một khóa học lập trình phù hợp với đối tượng là những bạn đã có kiến thức về lập trình hoặc ngôn ngữ lập trình. Hoặc những bạn đã biết lập trình một phần mềm và đang có nhu cầu phát triển mạnh Game online.
  • Khoa Pham.vn cam kết đầu ra cho học viên về mặt kiến thức và kỹ năng. Đồng thời cung cấp nhiều kinh nghiệm và chau dồi kkhả năng làm việc nhóm.

>>> Xem thêm : Học lập trình Online: Bí kíp giúp học hiệu quả cho người mới

3. IT+

  • IT+ hướng đến các đối tượng học viên là những học sinh đã tốt nghiệp THPT (trên 18 tuổi), sinh viên các khoa CNTT của các trường cao đẳng, đại học,… thậm chí là các nhân viên phát triển Mobile Game tại các doanh nghiệp.
  • Bên cạnh việc đào tạo các kiến thức lý thuyết về ngôn ngữ lập trình C#. IT+ còn nâng cao khả năng nhận biết, hiểu và nắm chắc tư tưởng trong lập trình,… Cúng các kiến thức bổ ích khác.
6 Years of Learning Game Development
6 Years of Learning Game Development

Mascot

On December 16, 2013, Unity Technologies Japan revealed an official mascot character named Unity-chan (ユニティちゃん, Yuniti-chan), real name Kohaku Ōtori (大鳥 こはく, Ōtori Kohaku) (voiced by Asuka Kakumoto). The character’s associated game data was released in early 2014.[128][129] The character was designed by Unity Technologies Japan designer “ntny” as an open-source heroine character.[130] The company allows the use of Unity-chan and related characters in secondary projects under certain licenses.[131] For example, Unity-chan appears as a playable character in Runbow.[132]

What Unity Isn’t

I hesitate to describe anything Unity isn’t as people challenge that all the time. However, Unity by default isn’t a system in which to design your 2D assets and 3D models (except for terrains). You can bring a bunch of zombies into a scene and control them, but you wouldn’t create zombies in the Unity default tooling. In that sense, Unity isn’t an asset-creation tool like Autodesk Maya or 3DSMax, Blender or even Adobe Photoshop. There’s at least one third-party modeling plug-in (ProBuilder), though, that allows you to model 3D components right inside of Unity; there are 2D world builder plug-ins such as the 2D Terrain Editor for creating 2D tiled environments, and you can also design terrains from within Unity using their Terrain Tools to create amazing landscapes with trees, grass, mountains, and more. So, again, I hesitate to suggest any limits on what Unity can do.

Where does Microsoft fit into this? Microsoft and Unity work closely together to ensure great platform support across the Microsoft stack. Unity supports Windows standalone executables, Windows Phone, Windows Store applications, Xbox 360 and Xbox One.

1 Year MAKING an OPEN-WORLD game
1 Year MAKING an OPEN-WORLD game

Unity-Generated Code Projects

Once you have code in your project, Unity creates one or more project files in your root folder (which isn’t visible in the Unity interface). These are not the Unity engine binaries, but instead the projects for Visual Studio or MonoDevelop in which you’ll edit and compile your code. Unity can create what might seem like a lot of separate projects, as Figure 11 shows, although each one has a an important purpose.

Figure 11 Unity-Created Projects

If you have a simple Unity project, you won’t see all of these files. They get created only when you have code put into various special folders. The projects shown in Figure 11 are broken out by only three types:

  • Assembly-CSharp.csproj
  • Assembly-CSharp-Editor.csproj
  • Assembly-CSharp-firstpass.csproj

For each of those projects, there’s a duplicate project created with -vs appended to it, Assembly-CSharp-vs.csproj, for example. These projects are used if Visual Studio is your code editor and they can be added to your exported project from Unity for platform-specific debugging in your Visual Studio solution.

The other projects serve the same purpose but have CSharp replaced with UnityScript. These are simply the JavaScript (UnityScript) versions of the projects, which will exist only if you use JavaScript in your Unity game and only if you have your scripts in the folders that trigger these projects to be created.

Now that you’ve seen what projects get created, I’ll explore the folders that trigger these projects and show you what their purposes are. Every folder path assumes it’s underneath the /Assets root folder in your project view. Assets is always the root folder and contains all of your asset files underneath it. For example, Standard Assets is actually /Assets/Standard Assets. The build process for your scripts runs through four phases to generate assemblies. Objects compiled in Phase 1 can’t see those in Phase 2 because they haven’t yet been compiled. This is important to know when you’re mixing UnityScript and C# in the same project. If you want to reference a C# class from UnityScript, you need to make sure it compiles in an earlier phase.

Phase 1 consists of runtime scripts in the Standard Assets, Pro Standard Assets and Plug-ins folders, all located under/Assets. This phase creates the Assembly-CSharp-firstpass.csproj project.

Phase 2 scripts are in the Standard Assets/Editor, Pro Standard Assets/Editor and Plug-ins/Editor folders. The last folder is meant for scripts that interact with the Unity Editor API for design-time functionality (think of a Visual Studio plug-in and how it enhances the GUI, only this runs in the Unity Editor). This phase creates the Assembly-CSharp-Editor-firstpass.csproj project.

Phase 3 comprises all other scripts that aren’t inside an Editor folder. This phase creates the Assembly-CSharp-Editor.csproj project.

Phase 4 consists of all remaining scripts (those inside any other folder called Editor, such as /Assets/Editor or /Assets/Foo/Editor). This phase creates the Assembly-CSharp.csproj project.

There are a couple other less-used folders that aren’t covered here, such as Resources. And there is the pending question of what the compiler is using. Is it .NET? Is it Mono? Is it .NET for the Windows Runtime (WinRT)? Is it .NET for Windows Phone Runtime? Figure 12 lists the defaults used for compilation. This is important to know, especially for WinRT-based applications because the APIs available per platform vary.

Figure 12 Compilation Variations

Platform Game Assemblies Generated By Final Compilation Performed By
Windows Phone 8 Mono Visual Studio/.NET
Windows Store .NET Visual Studio/.NET (WinRT)
Windows Standalone (.exe) Mono Unity – generates .exe + libs
Windows Phone 8.1 .NET Visual Studio/.NET (WinRT)

When you perform a build for Windows, Unity is responsible for making the calls to generate the game libraries from your C#/UnityScript/Boo code (DLLs) and to include its native runtime libraries. For Windows Store and Windows Phone 8, it will export a Visual Studio solution, except for Windows standalone, in which Unity generates the .exe and required .dll files. I’ll discuss the various build types in the final article in the series, when I cover building for the platform. The graphics rendering at a low level is performed on the Windows platforms by DirectX.

Designing a game in Unity is a fairly straightforward process:

  • Bring in your assets (artwork, audio and so on). Use the asset store. Write your own. Hire an artist. Note that Unity does have native support for Maya, Cheetah3d, Blender and 3dsMax, in some cases requiring that software be installed to work with those native 3D formats, and it works with .obj and .fbx common file formats, as well.
  • Write code in C#, JavaScript/UnityScript, or Boo, to control your objects, scenes, and implement game logic.
  • Test in Unity. Export to a platform.
  • Test on that platform. Deploy.

History

The Unity game engine launched in 2005, aiming to “democratize” game development by making it accessible to more developers.[7][10] The next year, Unity was named runner-up in the Best Use of Mac OS X Graphics category in Apple Inc.’s Apple Design Awards.[11] Unity was initially released for Mac OS X, later adding support for Microsoft Windows and Web browsers.[12]

Unity 2.0 (2007)

Unity 2.0 launched in 2007 with approximately 50 new features.[13] The release included an optimized terrain engine for detailed 3D environments, real-time dynamic shadows, directional lights and spotlights, video playback, and other features.[13] The release also added features whereby developers could collaborate more easily.[13] It included a Networking Layer for developers to create multiplayer games based on the User Datagram Protocol, offering Network Address Translation, State Synchronization, and Remote Procedure Calls.[13] When Apple launched its App Store in 2008, Unity quickly added support for the iPhone.[12] For several years, the engine was uncontested on the iPhone and it became well known with iOS game developers.[7]

Unity 3.0 (2010)

Unity 3.0 launched in September 2010 with features expanding the engine’s graphics features for desktop computers and video game consoles.[14] In addition to Android support, Unity 3 featured integration of Illuminate Labs’ Beast Lightmap tool, deferred rendering, a built-in tree editor, native font rendering, automatic UV mapping, and audio filters, among other things.[14] In 2012 VentureBeat wrote, “Few companies have contributed as much to the flowing of independently produced games as Unity Technologies. […] More than 1.3 million developers are using its tools to create gee-whiz graphics in their iOS, Android, console, PC, and web-based games. Unity wants to be the engine for multi-platform games, period.”[15] A May 2012 survey by Game Developer magazine indicated Unity as its top game engine for mobile platforms.[16]

Unity 4.0 (2012)

In November 2012, Unity Technologies delivered Unity 4.0.[17] This version added DirectX 11 and Adobe Flash support, new animation tools called Mecanim, and access to the Linux preview.[17]

Facebook integrated a software development kit for games using the Unity game engine in 2013.[18] This featured tools that allowed tracking advertising campaigns and deep linking, where users were directly linked from social media posts to specific portions within games, and easy in-game-image sharing.[18] In 2016, Facebook developed a new PC gaming platform with Unity.[19] Unity provided support for Facebook’s gaming platforms, and Unity developers could more quickly export and publish games to Facebook.[19]

Unity 5 (2015)

The Verge said of 2015’s Unity 5 release: “Unity started with the goal of making game development universally accessible. […] Unity 5 is a long-awaited step towards that future.”[20] With Unity 5, the engine improved its lighting and audio.[21] Through WebGL, Unity developers could add their games to compatible Web browsers with no plug-ins required for players.[21] Unity 5.0 offered real-time global illumination, light mapping previews, Unity Cloud, a new audio system, and the Nvidia PhysX 3.3 physics engine.[21] The fifth generation of the Unity engine also introduced Cinematic Image Effects to help make Unity games look less generic.[22] Unity 5.6 added new lighting and particle effects, updated the engine’s overall performance, and added native support for Nintendo Switch, Facebook Gameroom, Google Daydream, and the Vulkan graphics API.[23] It introduced a 4K video player capable of running 360-degree videos for virtual reality.[23]

However, some gamers criticized Unity’s accessibility due to the high volume of quickly produced games published on the Steam distribution platform by inexperienced developers.[24] Former CEO John Riccitiello said in an interview that he believes this to be a side-effect of Unity’s success in democratizing game development: “If I had my way, I’d like to see 50 million people using Unity – although I don’t think we’re going to get there any time soon. I’d like to see high school and college kids using it, people outside the core industry. I think it’s sad that most people are consumers of technology and not creators. The world’s a better place when people know how to create, not just consume, and that’s what we’re trying to promote.”[25]

Unity (2017–present)

In December 2016, Unity Technologies announced that they would change the version numbering system for Unity from sequence-based identifiers to year of release to align the versioning with their more frequent release cadence; Unity 5.6 was therefore followed by Unity 2017.[26] Unity 2017 tools featured a real-time graphics rendering engine, color grading and worldbuilding, live operations analytics and performance reporting.[27] Unity 2017.2 underscored Unity Technologies’ plans beyond video games.[27] This included new tools such as Timeline, which allowed developers to drag-and-drop animations into games, and Cinemachine, a smart camera system within games.[27] Unity 2017.2 also integrated Autodesk’s 3DS Max and Maya tools into the Unity engine for a streamlined asset sharing in-game iteration process.[28]

Unity 2018 featured the Scriptable Render Pipeline for developers to create high-end graphics.[29] This included the High-Definition Rendering Pipeline for console and PC experiences, and the Lightweight Rendering Pipeline (later renamed to the Universal Render Pipeline[30]) for mobile, virtual reality, and augmented reality.[29] Unity 2018 also included machine learning tools, such as Imitation Learning, whereby games learn from real player habits, support for Magic Leap, and templates for new developers.[29]

The C# source code of Unity was published under a “reference-only” license in March 2018, which prohibits reuse and modification.[31]

As of 2020, software built with Unity’s game engine was running on more than 1.5 billion devices. According to Unity, apps made with their game engine account for 50 percent of all mobile games, and are downloaded more than 3 billion times per month, and approximately 15,000 new projects are started daily with its software.[32][33] Financial Times reported that Unity’s engine “powers some of the world’s most lucrative mobile games”, such as Pokémon Go and Activision’s Call of Duty Mobile.[34]

In June 2020, Unity introduced the Mixed and Augmented Reality Studio (MARS), which provides developers with additional functionality for rules-based generation of augmented reality (AR) applications.[35] Unity released Unity Forma, an automotive and retail solution tool, on December 9, 2020.[36]

Unity acquired Finger Food Advanced Technology Group in 2020, as it aimed to bolster its non-video game uses and offer additional design help to customers.[32][33] The company went public in September 2020, to further expand use of its game engine into industries outside of gaming.[37]

In June 2020, Unity announced the Unity Editor will support Apple Silicon. The first beta version shipped later that year.[38][39]

Unity 2021 brought multiple new features such as Bolt, Unity’s Visual Scripting system, a new multiplayer library to support multiplayer games, improved Il2cpp runtime performance, Volumetric clouds for the High Definition Render pipeline.[40] Shadow caching and Screen Space Global Illumination for HDRP.[41] For the Universal Render Pipeline it added new features such as point light shadows, Deferred renderer and general core engine improvements and fixes.[42][43] Full Apple Silicon support was also added in Unity 2021.2. Unity Hub support for Apple Silicon editors arrived in version 3.0 in January 2022.[44]

Changes to Unity 2022 were intended to improve productivity by reducing the time required to enter play mode and import files, and implementing visual search queries and multi selection in the package manager.[45] For 2D projects, changes focused on accelerating core software, import, animation, and physics. Sprite atlasing was revised. Support for PSD extension files and layer management were added to the 2D PSD Importer, and Delaunay tessellation for 2D physics was added.[45]

On October 9, 2023, Unity announced that Riccitiello would be leaving the company, appointing Jim Whitehurst as interim CEO and President.[46][47][48]

On November 16, 2023, Unity announced that the next version of the engine would be called Unity 6, reverting to the previous version numbering convention. Unity 6 is planned for release in 2024, with planned features including new generative AI tools called Unity Muse and Unity Sentis.[49]

Making a Game in 1 SECOND!
Making a Game in 1 SECOND!

Supported platforms

Unity is a cross-platform engine.[61] The Unity editor is supported on Windows, macOS, and the Linux platform, while the engine itself currently supports building games for more than 19 different platforms, including mobile, desktop, consoles, and virtual reality.[62][63] Unity 2020 LTS officially supports the following platforms:[64]

  • Mobile platforms iOS,[65] Android[65] (Android TV[66]), tvOS;[67]
  • Desktop platforms Windows[65] (Universal Windows Platform[68]), Mac,[10] Linux;[69]
  • Web platform WebGL;[63]
  • Console platforms PlayStation 4,[65] PlayStation 5,[70] Xbox One,[10] Xbox Series X/S,[71] Nintendo Switch;[65]
  • Virtual/Extended reality platforms Oculus,[65] PlayStation VR,[72] Google’s ARCore,[73] Apple’s ARKit,[74] Windows Mixed Reality[75] (HoloLens[76]), Magic Leap,[77] and via Unity XR SDK[78] Steam VR,[79] Google Cardboard.[80]

Formerly supported platforms are Wii,[81] Wii U,[82] PlayStation 3,[83] Xbox 360,[83] Tizen,[84] PlayStation Vita,[85] 3DS,[86] BlackBerry 10,[87] Windows Phone 8,[87] Samsung Smart TV,[88] Gear VR,[63] Daydream,[89] Vuforia,[73] Facebook Gameroom,[89] and Stadia.[90] Unity formerly supported other platforms including its own Unity Web Player, a Web browser plugin.[69] However, it was deprecated in favor of WebGL.[91] Since version 5, Unity has been offering its WebGL bundle compiled to JavaScript using a 2-stage language translator (C# to C++ and finally to JavaScript).[92]

Unity was the default software development kit (SDK) used for Nintendo’s Wii U video game console, with a free copy included by Nintendo with each Wii U developer license. Unity Technologies called this bundling of a third-party SDK an “industry first”.[15][93]

In August 2023, Unity China announced that it would soon launch a Chinese edition called Tuanjie Engine (Chinese: 团结引擎; pinyin: Tuánjié Yǐnqíng) based on Unity 2022 LTS, which includes support for Chinese platforms like Weixin Mini Game, OpenHarmony and AliOS.[94]

Getting Started

Download the latest version of Unity and get yourself a two-button mouse with a clickable scroll wheel. There’s a single download that can be licensed for free mode or pro. You can see the differences between the versions at unity3d.com/unity/licenses. The Editor, which is the main Unity interface, runs on Windows (including Surface Pro), Linux and OS X.

I’ll get into real game development with Unity in the next article, but, first, I’ll explore the Unity interface, project structure and architecture.

Why Godot made me RUN back to Unity
Why Godot made me RUN back to Unity

Các tài liệu tự học Unity 3D

Một số tài liệu cho việc học Unity 3D

Hiện nay, các nguồn thông tin, kiến thức tràn lan trên internet có thể khiến cho các bạn hoang mang trong việc nguồn tài liệu. Để các bạn có thể tự tìm hiểu thêm về phát triển phần mềm game cũng như về Unity 3D. Chúng tôi gửi tới bạn một số tài liệu tham khảo để có thể tự học, tự tìm hiểu:

[Tổng hợp tài liệu từ cơ bản đến nâng cao]

[Video hướng dẫn lập trình bằng Unity 3D]

[Tài liệu hướng dẫn lập trình Unity 3D theo chuyên đề]

Một thông tin lý thú cho các bạn trẻ có đam mê công nghệ. Hiện tại, Teky có tổ chức một lớp học trải nghiệm miễn phí cho các bạn trẻ về lĩnh vực này. Nếu bạn có đam mê hay phụ huynh học sinh muốn tạo điều kiện cho con mình được tiếp xúc với một chương trình mới. Có thể tham khảo tại trang chủ Teky. Chương trình được tổ chức thường xuyên. Thu được nhiều kết quả khả quan từ phía phụ huynh và học sinh. Cụ thể là đã có tới 98% trẻ em sau khi tham gia khóa học đã được khơi dậy niềm đam mê học công nghệ. Tất cả trẻ em có độ tuổi từ 5 tuổi sau khi tham gia đã có thể thiết kế, thậm chí có thể in đồ chơi 3D,…

Lời kết: Như đã phân tích, Unity 3D là công cụ hỗ trợ rất mạnh cho lập trình. Nếu bạn lựa chọn theo đuổi con đường phát triển game chuyên nghiệp. Học Unity 3D sẽ là chìa khóa để bạn gần hơn với thành công.

Bài viết này đã mang lại cho bạn những thông tin cơ bản. Chúc các bạn thành công với UNITY 3D. Và vững bước trên con đường phát triển game chuyên nghiệp.

Unity (game engine)

Developer(s) Unity Technologies
Initial release 1.0 / June 8, 2005
Stable release
Preview release
Written in
Platform See § Supported platforms
License Proprietary software
Website unity

Unity is a cross-platform game engine developed by Unity Technologies, first announced and released in June 2005 at Apple Worldwide Developers Conference as a Mac OS X game engine. The engine has since been gradually extended to support a variety of desktop, mobile, console and virtual reality platforms. It is particularly popular for iOS and Android mobile game development, is considered easy to use for beginner developers, and is popular for indie game development.[6]

The engine can be used to create three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) games, as well as interactive simulations and other experiences.[7][8] The engine has been adopted by industries outside video gaming, such as film, automotive, architecture, engineering, construction, and the United States Armed Forces.[9]

Frequently asked questions

All you need is your existing 3D model data plus Unity Industry.

Still figuring out what’s possible with Unity? Talk to an expert.

Unity’s Accelerate Solutions team can help. Consisting of knowledgeable engineers, industry experts, and solutions architects, Accelerate Solutions can work with you to plan and execute your business’s digital transformation, and leave behind a working infrastructure that your team can manage.

The cost depends on the software options you need. Explore the available solutions for more details, including pricing.

With Pixyz you can import 40+ 3D model file formats. With Reflect Review you can bring Revit, BIM 360, Navisworks, SketchUp, and Rhino projects into real-time 3D.

Unity Industry allows you to deploy experiences to 25+ leading platforms including iOS, Microsoft HoloLens, WebGL, Android, Windows and more. For the full list, consult this document.

Unity Learn is a free resource with over 750 hours of live and on-demand learning content for all levels of experience. For example, check out this course which demonstrates how to build VR applications with Unity for immersive automotive design iteration and team collaboration.

In addition to Unity Learn, Unity also offers a premium on-demand training platform for professional developers. Get access to hundreds of hours of content created by Unity-certified instructors and become an expert at your pace.

You want to start learning to code in Unity so you can get going on your first game, but you don’t know where to begin. We get the struggle. Here’s a breakdown of the scripting elements in Unity and some learning material that you can use to go through more advanced projects like “Space Shooter”. This should get you covered in the following areas: the very basics of coding, like variables, functions and classes, and how to use them.

Go here if you’re an experienced programmer but new to Unity.

On this page

What is scripting in Unity?

Scripting tells our GameObjects how to behave; it’s the scripts and components attached to the GameObjects, and how they interact with each other, that creates your gameplay. Now, scripting in Unity is different from pure programming. If you’ve done some pure programming, e.g. you created a running app, you should realize that in Unity you don’t need to create the code that runs the application, because Unity does it for you. Instead, you focus on the gameplay in your scripts.

Unity runs in a big loop. It reads all of the data that’s in a game scene. For example, it reads through the lights, the meshes, what the behaviors are, and it processes all of this information for you.

If you think about television, where, for example in North America, you have 29.5 frame/sec, Unity needs to do the same thing. It’s running single discrete frames, one after another. You direct Unity with the instructions that you write in your scripts, and Unity executes them frame after frame as fast as it can.

Achieving a high frame rate means not only your game will look more fluid, but your scripts will also be executed more often, making controls more responsive.

What languages can you use in Unity?

A script must be attached to a GameObject in the scene in order to be called by Unity. Scripts are written in a special language that Unity can understand. And, it’s through this language that we can talk to the engine and give it our instructions.

The language that’s used in Unity is called C# (pronounced C-sharp). All the languages that Unity operates with are object-oriented scripting languages. Like any language, scripting languages have syntax, or parts of speech, and the primary parts are called variables, functions, and classes.

If you’re using a version of Unity until 2017.3, you’ll notice that it has a text editor called MonoDevelop: it can help us complete our code, it’ll let us know if we’re writing a wrong piece of code, and allows us to take shortcuts. Starting with 2018.1, you can also use Visual Studio for Unity Community, or other text editors such as Visual Studio, Notepad, or Sublime text.

Here’s a script with some sample code in it (based on the Coding in Unity for the Absolute Beginner tutorial):

As you can see, there are variables, functions, and classes.

What do these do?

Variables hold values and references to objects (you can see objects as “bigger” variables). They’re like a box that holds something for us to use. Variables start with a lowercase letter.

Functions are collections of code that compare and manipulate these variables. Functions start with an uppercase letter. We organise code in functions so that they can be easily reused multiple times in different parts of the program.

Classes are a way to structure code to wrap collections of variables and functions together to create a template that defines the properties of an object.

Scripting is primarily comparing these objects and their current states and values. It’s based on logic determining an outcome or resolution.

Variables

In Unity, the scripts start by laying out the tools that you need at the top, and this is usually by declaring variables. You can see the declared variables here with the visibility keyword “public” or “private” at the front, followed by a type, and a name.

When we’re declaring your variables there are several visibility types, but the two most important ones are public and private.

If you create a script with the above text in your code editor and then come back to Unity and assign the script to a GameObject, you’ll see that you can access and see the light variable declared as public in the Inspector, but you can’t see the private one. And that’s because what’s defined as “private” can only be accessed within this particular script, within this particular class.

If you make this public, then it’s accessible to other scripts and other classes, and can be changed in the Inspector from the Unity editor. So, that means other people can access it and change its value.

There are many reasons to choose between private or public. Private variables allow your code to be cleaner, since you know that the value of those variables can be changed only inside that class. This makes debugging and maintaining the code easier.

If you choose “public” , and you experience an issue, you need to look inside your whole codebase in order to track the source because any other object has access to that variable. However, if you want objects to communicate between themselves you need some variables (or functions) to be public.

Another important aspect of variables is the type. A type defines what kind of value is the variable holding in memory, e.g. it can be a number, text, or more complex types, like the ones in the image below: Transform, Light and Demo Script in the image below are in fact references to Components. Unity needs to know what type of object it is so that it knows how to handle it.

Another important thing about variables is the name. The main thing that you need to remember about naming variables is that it can’t start with a number, and it can’t contain spaces. Therefore, there’s a style of writing the names. In C#, the naming convention is camelCase: you start with a lowercase letter and add words, without spaces, starting with a capital letter, e.g. “myLight”.

When Unity compiles the script, it makes public variables visible in the editor. See the image below from the inspector.

Functions

Scripts manipulate the variables by using functions. There are a number of functions that run automatically inside Unity. See below:

Awake is called only once when the GameObject with that component is instantiated. If a GameObject is inactive, then it will not be called until it is made active. However, Awake is called even if the GameObject is active but the component is not enabled (with the little checkbox next to its name). You can use Awake to initialize all the variables that you need to assign a value to.

Start – like Awake, Start will be called if a GameObject is active, but only if the component is enabled. For more information on the differences with Awake, see this video.

Update is called once per frame. This is where you put code to define the logic that runs continuously, like animations, AI, and other parts of the game that have to be constantly updated.

FixedUpdate is when you want to do physics work.

As you can see, there’s Fixed Update and Update and in our Scripting tutorials section, you can learn how to effect changes every frame with the Update and FixedUpdate functions, and their differences.

LateUpdate is a function that’s similar to Update, but LateUpdate is called at the end of the frame. Unity will look at all of the game objects, find all of the Updates, and call the LateUpdates. This is good for things like the camera. Let’s say you want to move a character in your game. And then he’s bumped into by another character and ends up in a different position. If we move the camera at the same time as the character, there would be a jiggle, and the camera wouldn’t be where it needs to be. So, basically, it’s a second loop that comes in very handy.

Writing functions

When writing a function, remember that functions start with the returned type of the function at the beginning, followed by the name of the function, and then the parameters in the parentheses (if any). Function names start with a capital letter and the body of the function goes between the curly brackets. Here’s an example on how to write a function:

How do we call this function?

Functions can do calculations and then return a value. You can ask a function to do something, process the information, then return an answer. If you use the type “void”, then they are not returning anything.

Classes

Classes are collections of these variables and functions. For example, this script is a class:

Bear in mind that the class name must match the file name of the C# script for it to work. And then to be attached to a GameObject, it has to derive from another class called MonoBehaviour which is automatically put there for you when you first create a script. Classes can also be public or private.

In Unity, if you create a custom class, like in the example below, you have to ask it to serialize it. This means that it will be converted into simple data that Unity can look at in the inspector. When you do that, it’ll see that you have the class will appear in the inspector.

Variables, functions, and classes are just the basics of starting with coding in Unity. Check out the Learn section, you can find a bunch of useful scripting tutorials that will help you go learn about programming from scratch, then progress to create detailed code for your projects.

August 2014

Volume 29 Number 8

Unity : Developing Your First Game with Unity and C#

As a software architect, I’ve written many systems, reverse-engineered native code malware, and generally could figure things out on the code side. When it came to making games, though, I was a bit lost as to where to start. I had done some native code graphics programming in the early Windows days, and it wasn’t a fun experience. I then started on DirectX development but realized that, although it was extremely powerful, it seemed like too much code for what I wanted to do.

Then, one day, I decided to experiment with Unity, and I saw it could do some amazing things. This is the first article in a four-part series that will cover the basics and architecture of Unity. I’ll show how to create 2D and 3D games and, finally, how to build for the Windows platforms.

Making My First Open World Game | Devlog #1
Making My First Open World Game | Devlog #1

3D tips from the Unity community

Sykoo: 3D Level Design

Sykoo makes the complex business of level design funny and easy to understand. Check out his video on Level Design Tricks in Unity 2019.

Mix and Jam: Popular game mechanics

Follow along with Mix and Jam as he shows you how he recreates some of the most popular video game mechanics in gaming history.

Brackeys: Making games without code

Check out Brackeys for incredible tutorials on making 3D games, especially this video about how you can MAKE GAMES WITHOUT CODE!

What is Unity – and is it the game development engine for you? Let’s talk about that.

If you’re an aspiring game developer, picking the right game engine to use for your game projects can be a bit tough. After all, what game engine you pick will ultimately affect the entire development process of your game. So, it’s not a decision to make lightly.

Assuming you’ve done any amount of research, though, you’ll have heard a ton of recommendations for Unity. Unity is definitely one of the most popular game engines being used today – particularly in the indie game development spheres. That being said, because of its popularity, these recommendations don’t always go into what Unity is, let alone why you should use it besides the fact “it’s great”.

Well today, we’re here to remedy that. We’re going to talk about not only “what is Unity” and what Unity offers you in terms of game development, but also why you would want to create games with Unity!

Table of contents

What is Unity and Who Owns Unity Game Engine

Our first stop on our exploration of “what is Unity”, we’ll talk about the foundations of literally what it is.

Unity is a 2D & 3D game engine that has been around since 2005. Developed by Unity Technologies, it was made in order to provide more developers access to game development tools, which in those days was a novel venture. Over the course of its long life, the engine has changed and expanded dramatically, managing to keep up with the latest practices and technologies.

Even today, the game engine’s main focus is to both provide the most robust set of tools possible for the game development industry, as well as make it as easy as possible for game developers of any skill level to use the engine (yes, including beginner developers). They’ve also expanded their reach into other industries as well with a huge focus on real-time 3D development, making it one of the most powerful engines available.

It is worth noting, that Unity also offers certifications in using the engine in areas such as game development or programming. It is one of the few industry-recognized credentials available for game development in general, making them stand apart from other game engines.

As a part of your journey into understanding Unity – and if you want to jump into learning now – Zenva’s Unity Game Development Mini-Degree offers a comprehensive collection of courses that delve into building cross-platform games with this robust game engine. It provides a practical, step-by-step guide, allowing you to go from learning the basics to creating your own 2D and 3D games. This Mini-Degree not only bolsters your understanding of Unity but serves as an invaluable resource for anyone looking to quickly dive into game development.

Key Features

Let’s talk about key features that the engine offers so you can decide if you want to download Unity. Plus, these features are a core part of what is Unity, so they’re good to know from that angle as well.

3D and 2D Graphics Support

As mentioned at the beginning, Unity provides support for both 3D and 2D graphics – allowing you the freedom to choose the art style you want for your projects. Each graphic type comes with its own specialized set tools (such as sprite sheet cutting for 2D graphics) and even has its own script APIs to call upon for different physics options that are suited for each style.

3D graphics also offer an extremely robust set of tools as well with the ability to create custom materials, build shaders with the Shader Graph, customize lighting, utilize post-processing effects, and more. You can even generate 3D terrain or create 2D tilemaps right in the engine, so there are a well-rounded set of tools to use for whatever graphics you’re using.

Easy-to-Understand Architecture

Unity offers a very transparent method for composing your game architecture. Each “level” in a Unity game project is divided into a Scene, and each scene contains all the game objects needed for the player to use the level – whether that’s the background, player character, enemy, bullet, or something else.

Unity also offers the ability to have a parent-child relationship between objects in the Hierarchy, making it very easy to add multiple objects (like an outfit, gun, or collider for collision detection) to one parent player character object. Beyond this, Unity also features the Inspector tool which gives you quick access to all your object’s properties, meaning you can change things on the fly quickly without needing to dive into the code all the time.

Unity Scripting API

Rather than going in blind, Unity comes with a powerful scripting API that offers you quick access to the most commonly needed features. This includes both general game features, as well as specific API calls that allow you to access specific features and nuances for the engine. You could argue this API is a large part of what is Unity as well – since the engine is nothing without it.

For example, while you can adjust UI elements from the engine itself, such as text color, the Scripting API also exposes those elements so you can adjust them via code as well. This goes for everything that can be accessed from the Unity Inspector, including position, rotation, materials, audio playback, and more beyond name. Plus, there is a lot of documentation to help you out.

Cross-platform Build Support

Unity games support building to an immense number of platforms. As long as the developer downloads the appropriate kit, you can export games for Android, iOS, Windows, MacOS, Linux, PS4, Xbox One, and more. You can even export HTML5 games if you want to put your game on the web (assuming performance is optimal).

The engine also makes it so you have to make as few tweaks as possible for the various builds, limiting the need to have multiple versions of your project for each platform.

Virtual Reality & Augmented Reality Capabilities

When it comes to VR and AR, which are newer technologies, Unity is one of the key supporters for developing with them. For VR, there are numerous packages available that support almost all VR headsets available, and they are constantly updated and kept flexible with this changing technology. You can even test your VR games in the engine.

AR is not to be left behind though, with numerous packages for ARCore and ARKit. Unity also offers AR Foundation, which Unity built to allow Unity developers to create AR apps for Android and iOS at the same time, eliminating the need for separate projects.

To boot, Unity also now has the XR Interaction Toolkit to make developing VR and AR games even easier. So, suffice it to say, Unity is one of the biggest supporters of XR technologies.

Large Asset Store

Whether you’re in need of graphical assets, specific game genre templates, audio, particle effects, or something else, Unity has got you covered. Its immensely large asset store comes with a variety of paid and free assets you can use for any game project. It also plays a key role in understand what is Unity – since in some case people may be referring to just the asset store.

While Unity does develop some of these, many of them are also made by the community, meaning you have a huge variety to choose from. Plus, Unity makes it very easy to add assets to your collection and install them into your project with the package manager, meaning no fussing with files manually.

Unity Developed Packages

In the same vein as above, Unity itself offers a ton of in-house developed packages and assets for free that extend the functionality of the engine in useful ways. For example, the Bolt asset offers a way to implement visual scripting into the Unity engine.

Meanwhile, Unity Playground offers a 2D game framework that allows you to learn Unity game development without the need to code from scratch. Everything from free models to various game kits are offered by Unity for free, giving you quick access to Unity-approved assets to practice with.

Rendering Pipeline Options

Rendering graphics to the screen is no easy feat for a computer, and how it accomplishes this can have some significant effects on your games’ performance. This is why Unity has offered several built-in options for the render pipelines you can use to get your game from scene to play screen. This allows developers to choose the render pipeline that best suits their projects and the graphical needs of those projects.

Additionally, Unity also offers the Scriptable Render Pipeline API, which lets developers make their own pipeline if they feel up to it. Thus, there is a lot of freedom in terms of how the game gets rendered for your players! These pipelines also make a core part of understanding what is Unity since they define a lot of how Unity is used.

Animation Tools

Unity offers a robust set of animation tools that work for both 3D and 2D graphics. While you absolutely can import animations from another program, such as Blender, Unity offers you the ability to animate your projects right within the engine itself. This includes adjusting the position and rotation of an entire object, to actually physically manipulating the bones in a 3D model. Unity even offers you the ability to add bone rigging to 2D images.

All these features can, of course, be accessed from the Scripting API as well, giving you unparalleled control of how your animations work.

In addition, its Animator system allows you to easily create an animation state machine. This means you can not only play animations based on what the player is doing (such as jumping), but transition between each animation appropriately and smoothly. Plus, as the Animator is presented in a more visual graph style, it’s easy to understand how everything connects.

Adaptability to Other Industries

While Unity is a game engine first and foremost, and the part we’re focusing on, it is worth noting Unity has also gone out of its way to add features and supplements to make the engine useful to other industries.

For example, because of its pipeline options and animation tools, Unity is actually capable of being used for high-fidelity CG films, which many indie filmmakers have taken advantage of. In another vein, Unity has also created things like Unity Reflect to provide building developers a way to visualize their projects and connect them with other CAD software.

There are many more examples, but Unity is easily able to extend far beyond what it was made for and provide generalized, real-time 3D support. So, when answering “what is Unity”, remember its applications extend far beyond just games!

Analytics Tools

As you gain more skills as a game developer, it becomes more imperative to have a variety of analytics tools at your disposal. Unity offers several to help out, including tools to track performance issues and tools to simply observe how players are interacting with your game project.

Additionally, Unity also offers a number of ways to enhance debugging with these tools, providing a robust way to understand every aspect of your game.

What Can Be Made with Unity

We’ve crossed a prime threshold in understand what is Unity – but there’s still another aspect: what can Unity even do?

Basically, the only thing limiting what you can make in Unity is performance and your own imagination. Do you want to make RPGs, survival games, strategy games, and platformers? Unity can do that. Do you want to make an animated short film? Unity can do that. Do you want to make the next VR hit to help schools with providing kids new ways to learn? Unity can do that.

This is one of those times where the sky is really the limit, as there are just endless opportunities and tools that have made Unity a popular engine for every industry. In fact, there are a ton of popular games you probably don’t realize were made with the engine. These include:

… and many more! In fact, we encourage you to read up on Unity’s own case studies! You can also view some of the showcases below to get a feel of the true power of Unity and have a better understanding of what is Unity and its place in the world.

If you want to see what else can be made with Unity, consider delving into Zenva’s Unity Game Development Mini-Degree, a comprehensive collection of courses specifically designed to transform you into a proficient game developer. With this Mini-Degree, you’ll gain a nuanced understanding of Unity’s capabilities, following a path that begins with basics like coding with C#, extends to building immersive 2D and 3D games, and culminates in crafting complex humanoid animations and cinematic cutscenes.

It’s a practical, step-by-step guide that not only illuminates the vast spectrum of Unity’s potentials but also equips you with the skills to materialize your unique creative visions into stunning and fully functional video games. It’s also a great way to expand your know of what is Unity even.

Why Choose Unity

Since there are many engines available, you might wonder why you should choose Unity software. In this quick list, we’ll go into the main reasons why Unity is a fantastic engine to use for your game development needs (and how understanding our answers to what is Unity plays a role in making these critical decisions).

For most beginning developers, it’s free.

If you’re new to game dev, the first question on your mind may not be what can the Unity game engine do. It may in fact be “is Unity free to use” – because money is a tight and finite resource.

Are you earning more than $100K on your Unity-made projects? No? Well, then Unity is absolutely free to use. You can even sell the games you make with Unity using the free version. It’s only when you hit that $100K threshold that you have to start worrying about expensive licenses. To start out though, you don’t need to worry about these extra costs and can focus on the game development process itself.

This said, if you ever do want to monetize, Unity games really pay out if you make a worthwhile product – whether that be a game of even Unity apps.

It is beginner-friendly.

While there is a slight learning curve in understanding the Unity UI, past that using Unity is a breeze even if there’s a lot to answering what is Unity. As mentioned above, the architecture of Unity is very easy to understand, and adding objects is as simple as right-clicking in the correct spot. Plus, with the Unity Inspector, most properties are readily exposed and can be adjusted from the engine itself – no coding from scratch needed if you don’t want to.

In addition, Unity does offer kits and Unity frameworks to take out even more of the grunt work if you aren’t ready to learn C#, so being beginner-friendly is a specialty of the engine.

It is simultaneously powerful and versatile.

There is no question that the features described when we answered what is Unity make Unity capable of just about anything.

With its high-quality pipelines, you can render even the most intense of graphical projects. At the same time, though, Unity offers one of the most robust set of tools – from animation to its Shader Graph – that basically supports any kind of game or project you want to make. As such, if you only have a vague idea of what you’ll be doing with your project, Unity can suit just about anything.

Because of its popularity, there is a huge community.

This “why” is pretty self-explanatory. We aren’t kidding when we say that Unity is one of the most popular engines. As such, there are numerous discussion areas about Unity where you can talk shop with other developers, whether that be on Unity’s own forums or on a dedicated subreddit. With a larger community, this means you have more opportunities to network and get help with any kind of coding hiccups you might experience while developing.

In fact, the community is a huge part of describing what is Unity since it’s a core part of the Unity game development experience.

For things like VR & AR, there are few better choices.

While there are a few engines that support VR & AR, like Unreal Engine, few do as well as Unity. Unity actively supports these technologies in every way it possibly can and has been on board with them since almost the beginning of their rise. While there are certainly improvements that could be made in how Unity implements these aspects, the sheer amount of support and integration with the engine make it just the best choice if you’re interested in developing projects for these technologies.

Many programs consider export or development for Unity.

Given that Unity is so popular, a lot of programs actually consider how their own assets might be imported into Unity. This might include something as simple as making sure file formats used are applicable in Unity. However, some companies partner with Unity to certain degrees and develop tools specifically for integration with Unity, such as the case with Unity Reflect.

Even further, other companies actually develop SDKs specifically for Unity so that developers have easy access the technologies they create. As such, just in terms of compatibility with other programs, Unity is one of the kings.

Unity is actively and caringly developed and updated.

While some engines and frameworks fall out of style and lose both developer and community support, not Unity. Unity is painstakingly updated constantly by Unity Technologies, whether that means packages natively used with Unity or the engine itself. Every year there is a new major version of Unity created with new and exciting features not seen before in the engine. Thus, game development with the engine only gets easier and easier as more and more features and tools are created to aid developers.

The asset store is a huge help.

If you’re not an artist, getting game assets can be a pain. Especially if you’re most interested in programming or are eager to prototype your game idea, it’s generally not something you want to deal with. Thus, having such a huge asset store available is heaven-sent. It allows you to get assets quickly and implement them into your project with just a few clicks. This means you can focus on what matters to you and just make sure the game is fun first and foremost – even if you want to replace the assets later with different ones.

There are a lot of learning resources.

Similar to the large community aspect, Unity just flat out has a lot of learning resources available. Whether you want to make something as easy as a platformer or something as complicated as a multiplayer battle royale with procedurally generated levels, there are endless tutorials out there to help you. With this variety of tutorials, this also means you can usually find something that suits your own learning style. So, no worries about having only one resource that you find boring – you can always find another out there to learn from.

For example, consider taking Zenva’s Unity Game Development Mini-Degree as part of your learning journey. It’s the world’s most comprehensive collection of Unity courses that guides you through building your own 2D and 3D games – truly demonstrating the versatility and efficiency of the Unity game engine. This Mini-Degree is an invaluable resource for grasping the concept of Unity, from basic coding with C# to mastering advanced skills like optimizing huge worlds and testing & debugging, offering you a well-rounded understanding of this popular game engine.

(Note we’ve already assumed here that if you’re asking what is Unity, you might want to learn to make games – we’ve got you covered below).

It is one of the best engines for mobile development currently.

Just as Unity technology supports VR and AR actively, it also puts a lot of emphasis on being compatible with mobile devices. Not only is its Scripting API friendly in most cases for mobile development, but it offers tons of tools to support mobile development.

For example, with the newer Unity Device Simulator, you can test out how the game appears on different devices – including planning where different phones have their bevel or camera. This is not to mention that building for mobile in Unity is as simple as just including the right SDK, so you don’t have to worry a whole lot about making separate projects for your games.

Learn Unity Game Development

At this point, you should be able to answer what is Unity editor and many more questions. So, maybe after all is said and done, you’re now ready to download Unity and make games with it! However, you obviously need to learn it first before going wild here. In the list below, you can find a collection of recommendations to get you going with your Unity projects – whether that’s the full Unity3D game development process or just starting with Unity programming.

  • Unity Game Development Mini-Degree by Zenva
  • 2D RPG Academy by Zenva
  • Strategy Game Development Academy by Zenva
  • Multiplayer Game Development Mini-Degree by Zenva
  • EdTech Mini-Degree by Zenva
  • Unity 101 – Game Development Foundations by Zenva
  • COMPLETE COURSE – Create a Unity FPS in 3 Hours by Zenva
  • GameDev Academy
  • How to Program in C# by Brackeys
  • Learn C# Scripting for Unity in 15 Minutes (2020) by Charger Games
  • Unity Full Beginner Tutorial 2020 | Make your first game! by Sorcerer
  • Unity Beginner Tutorials Series by Brackeys
  • How to Make a Game – Unity Beginner Tutorial by Jason Weimann
  • Unity Beginner Basics | Video Game Design | 3D in 2021! by JMcad DESIGN
  • Unity Tutorial For Beginners [COMPLETE SERIES] by Jimmy Vegas
  • How to make Your First Game TODAY! – (Unity 3D) by Jonas Tyroller

Conclusion

Hopefully, we’ve covered Unity comprehensively enough for you to answer what is Unity. Love it or hate it, Unity is still one of the most popular engines, and for good reason. It offers a ton of features and benefits whether you’re building games or need real-time 3D graphics for some other industry. Thus, rest assured learning to use Unity is a great option for aspiring game developers out there.

For those interested in diving deeper into this versatile engine, Zenva’s Unity Game Development Mini-Degree offers an extensive compilation of courses to help you master cross-platform game development with Unity. These courses start from basic Unity knowledge, teaching C# coding and how to navigate the Unity editor and progress to more advanced topics like optimizing huge worlds and animation. Not only will the Mini-Degree equip you with an holistic understanding of Unity, it will also enable you to build a portfolio of Unity games and projects, an invaluable asset in the thriving game development industry.

Regardless, you should be better equipped to make your own decisions regarding Unity – or at least answer someone else if they ask you what is Unity. That being said, if it is the engine for you, we hope you download Unity soon and look forward to your future projects!

FINAL DAYS: Unlock coding courses in Unity, Godot, Unreal, Python and more.

Bring your game to life with the Asset Store

Building your first 3D game project can be challenging, but you don’t have to do everything yourself. You’ll find a ton of helpful content in the Unity Asset Store to bring some polish to your game. Visual effects, characters, environment art, sound effects and more are all ready to be downloaded and imported into your new game.

If You Can't Make Games After This Video...
If You Can’t Make Games After This Video…

Unity là gì?

Unity3D là gì

Hiện nay, với 27 nền tảng phát triển liên tục 15 năm (từ năm 2005), Unity đang được đánh giá là một trong những phần mềm đa nền tảng mạnh mẽ nhất cho những lập trình viên game.

Unity hỗ trợ được hầu hết trên các nền tảng từ IOS, Android, hay Windowa, MacOs,…, sử dụng các ngôn ngữ lập trình C# và Javascript. Điều đó đã tạo nên thế mạnh để Unity trở thành chìa khóa để phát triển phần mềm game tốt nhất hiện nay.

Ngoài ra, việc cho phép lập trình game theo thời gian thực của Unity đã cho phép các Designer có thêm nhiều lợi thế:

  • Không cần Render.
  • Thiết kế được Map, Character, Interface Graphic,.. từ những phần mềm khác (như Modo, Lightwave,…)
  • Tối ưu hóa định dạng file theo dạng “.FBX” hay “.exe”. Vì vậy, thiết kế có thể dễ dàng chia sẻ trên các thiết bị khác.

Bên cạnh đó, Unity có khả năng cung cấp các tính năng tích hợp quan trọng. Lập trình với Unity ngày càng trở nên đơn giản với các công cụ:

  • Cho phép lập trình viên có thể chia sẻ các bản thiết kế.
  • Cho phép sử dụng các tài nguyên hiệu ứng có sẵn trên Unity. Hoặc bạn có thể mua hoặc bán sản phẩm cho story của Unity.
  • Cung cấp hệ thống toàn diện, dễ sử dụng cho lập trình viên.

>>> Có thể bạn quan tâm:Học lập trình game cho người mới bắt đầu 3 điều bạn nên biết

What Unity Is

Unity is a 2D/3D engine and framework that gives you a system for designing game or app scenes for 2D, 2.5D and 3D. I say games and apps because I’ve seen not just games, but training simulators, first-responder applications, and other business-focused applications developed with Unity that need to interact with 2D/3D space. Unity allows you to interact with them via not only code, but also visual components, and export them to every major mobile platform and a whole lot more—for free. (There’s also a pro version that’s very nice, but it isn’t free. You can do an impressive amount with the free version.) Unity supports all major 3D applications and many audio formats, and even understands the Photoshop .psd format so you can just drop a .psd file into a Unity project. Unity allows you to import and assemble assets, write code to interact with your objects, create or import animations for use with an advanced animation system, and much more.

As Figure 1 indicates, Unity has done work to ensure cross-platform support, and you can change platforms literally with one click, although to be fair, there’s typically some minimal effort required, such as integrating with each store for in-app purchases.

Figure 1 Platforms Supported by Unity

Perhaps the most powerful part of Unity is the Unity Asset Store, arguably the best asset marketplace in the gaming market. In it you can find all of your game component needs, such as artwork, 3D models, animation files for your 3D models (see Mixamo’s content in the store for more than 10,000 motions), audio effects and full tracks, plug-ins—including those like the MultiPlatform toolkit that can help with multiple platform support—visual scripting systems such as PlayMaker and Behave, advanced shaders, textures, particle effects, and more. The Unity interface is fully scriptable, allowing many third-party plug-ins to integrate right into the Unity GUI. Most, if not all, professional game developers use a number of packages from the asset store, and if you have something decent to offer, you can publish it there as well.

Unity TERRAIN Tutorial - Easy and Quick (2023)
Unity TERRAIN Tutorial – Easy and Quick (2023)

Writing Code

In the prior code example, there are two methods, Start and Update, and the class EnemyHealth inherits from the MonoBehavior base class, which lets you simply assign that class to a GameObject. There’s a lot of functionality in that base class you’ll use, and typically a few methods and properties. The main methods are those Unity will call if they exist in your class. There are a handful of methods that can get called (see bit.ly/1jeA3UM). Though there are many methods, just as with the ASP.NET Web Forms Page Lifecycle, you typically use only a few. Here are the most common code methods to implement in your classes, which relate to the sequence of events for MonoBehavior-derived classes:

Awake: This method is called once per object when the object is first initialized. Other components may not yet be initialized, so this method is typically used to initialize the current GameObject. You should always use this method to initialize a MonoBehavior-derived class, not a constructor. And don’t try to query for other objects in your scene here, as they may not be initialized yet.

Start: This method is called during the first frame of the object’s lifetime but before any Update methods. It may seem very similar to Awake, but with Start, you know the other objects have been initialized via Awake and exist in your scene and, therefore, you can query other objects in code easily, like so:


// Returns the first EnemyAI script component instance it finds on any game object. // This type is EnemyAI (a component), not a GameObject. var enemyAI = GameObject.FindObjectOfType

(); // I'll actually get a ref to its top-level GameObject. var enemyGameObject = enemyAI.gameObject; // Want the enemy’s position? var position = enemyGameObject.transform.position;

Update: This method is called every frame. How often is that, you ask? Well, it varies. It’s completely computation-dependent. Because your system is always changing its load as it renders different things, this frame rate varies every second. You can press the Stats button in the Game tab when you go into play mode to see your current frame rate, as shown in Figure 10.

Figure 10 Getting Stats

FixedUpdate: This method is called a fixed number of times a second, independent of the frame rate. Because Update is called a varying number of times a second and isn’t in sync with the physics engine, it’s typically best to use FixedUpdate when you want to provide a force or some other physics-related functions on an object. FixedUpdate by default is called every .02 seconds, meaning Unity also performs physics calculations every .02 seconds (this interval is called the Fixed Timestep and is developer-adjustable), which, again, is independent of frame rate.

Insights

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A primer on immersive design visualization

Real-time 3D lets you explore more design options and iterate faster, allowing for design issues to be identified and resolved more quickly.

How to conduct collaborative design reviews

Discover how immersive collaboration can help your team catch flaws earlier, refine designs quicker and bring products to market faster.

Easily import your model data

Get complex models into real-time 3D. See how easy it is to import and optimize 3D data, including CAD assemblies, meshes and point clouds.

Bring your vision to life with Unity experts

Accelerate Solutions, Unity’s professional services team of engineers, creative directors, and industry experts, works with you to envision and execute your project.

Learning Unity Be Like
Learning Unity Be Like

Project Structure and Importing Assets

Unity projects aren’t like Visual Studio projects. You don’t open a project file or even a solution file, because it doesn’t exist. You point Unity to a folder structure and it opens the folder as a project. Projects contain Assets, Library, ProjectSettings, and Temp folders, but the only one that shows up in the interface is the Assets folder, which you can see in Figure 4.

The Assets folder contains all your assets—art, code, audio; every single file you bring into your project goes here. This is always the top-level folder in the Unity Editor. But make changes only in the Unity interface, never through the file system.

The Library folder is the local cache for imported assets; it holds all metadata for assets. The ProjectSettings folder stores settings you configure from Edit | Project Settings. The Temp folder is used for temporary files from Mono and Unity during the build process.

I want to stress the importance of making changes only through the Unity interface and not the file system directly. This includes even simple copy and paste. Unity tracks metadata for your objects through the editor, so use the editor to make changes (outside of a few fringe cases). You can drag and drop from your file system into Unity, though; that works just fine.

About Scenes

Everything that runs in your game exists in a scene. When you package your game for a platform, the resulting game is a collection of one or more scenes, plus any platform-dependent code you add. You can have as many scenes as you want in a project. A scene can be thought of as a level in a game, though you can have multiple levels in one scene file by just moving the player/camera to different points in the scene. When you download third-party packages or even sample games from the asset store, you typically must look for the scene files in your project to open. A scene file is a single file that contains all sorts of metadata about the resources used in the project for the current scene and its properties. It’s important to save a scene often by pressing Ctrl+S during development, just as with any other tool.

Typically, Unity opens the last scene you’ve been working on, although sometimes when Unity opens a project it creates a new empty scene and you have to go find the scene in your project explorer. This can be pretty confusing for new users, but it’s important to remember if you happen to open up your last project and wonder where all your work went! Relax, you’ll find the work in a scene file you saved in your project. You can search for all the scenes in your project by clicking the icon indicated in Figure 4 and filtering on Scene.

Figure 4 Filtering Scenes in the Project

In a scene, you can’t see anything without a camera and you can’t hear anything without an Audio Listener component attached to some GameObject. Notice, however, that in any new scene, Unity always creates a camera that has an Audio Listener component already on it.

In 2022, what did I do using Unity3D? The CEO of the engine mentioned me ~
In 2022, what did I do using Unity3D? The CEO of the engine mentioned me ~

Why Unity?

Create once, ship anywhere

Be where your players are with support for innovative new platforms and technologies. Build your content once and deploy across all major AR, VR, mobile, desktop, and console platforms.

Build mobile games

Unity boosts mobile game success with swift prototyping, performance optimization, and revenue growth tools, enhancing player engagement across the game lifecycle.

Unleash creativity with powerful tools

Create beautiful, immersive experiences that engage from the very first pixels. With Unity, creative teams can iterate quickly in the same environment. From worldbuilding, animation, and cinematics to rendering, the Unity Editor works seamlessly with tools like Maya or Blender to keep artists and designers in the flow.

A fast and flexible platform for programmers

Get great games in the hands of your players faster. Unity enables both rapid prototyping and scalable asset pipelines with a customizable Editor. Deploy high-performing C# code to over 20 platforms.

“Unity not only brought out our best gameplay, they also helped make this amazing game available to a new Switch audience. They’re more than a long-term partner – they’re part of the core team.”

“I love the fact that I can touch every facet of audiovisual storytelling in one place, at the same time. The simplest way to describe working in Unity is pure creation.”

“Unity’s extremely high-quality visuals are unsurpassed, which is crucial for immersive experiences. We love the power of the Unity engine.”

Discover inspiring stories from creators who chose Unity to bring their projects to life.

Zenith: The Last City

IMMORTALITY

Get started

Wherever you are in your creative journey, Unity offers the resources you need to achieve even your wildest dreams.

Unity developer tools

Access the Unity ecosystem, manage your Unity projects, and install Editor versions, licensing, and templates from the Unity Hub. You can find and download the Hub and see an overview of our releases, roadmap, and documentation on the Developer Tools page.

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Build your skill set with our free, award-winning tutorials and sample projects. Full courses guide through the process of building video games, virtual reality (VR) or augmented reality (AR) experiences, and more. Join Unity Certified Instructors in live interactive sessions, and discover a rich trove of free resources you can access at your own pace.

Community

Find help and discuss solutions with experienced Unity users. Share your knowledge. Share the love.

Support & services

Access diverse support services to find help and learning resources that fit your needs, wherever you are in your production process.

Resource centre

Learn more about how to harness the power of Unity to make games and innovative real-time experiences across industries.

Unity is, simply put, the world’s most popular game engine. It packs a ton of features together and is flexible enough to make almost any game you can imagine.

With unrivaled cross-platform features, Unity is popular with both hobby developers and AAA studios. It’s been used to create games like Pokemon Go, Heathstone, Rimworld, Cuphead, and plenty more.

While 3D is in the name, Unity 3D also packs tools for 2D game development.

Programmers love it because of the C# scripting API and built-in Visual Studio integration. Unity also offers JavaScript as a scripting language and MonoDevelop as an IDE to those who want an alternative to Visual Studio.

But artists love it as well since it comes with powerful animation tools that make it simple to create your own 3D cutscenes or build 2D animations from scratch. Nearly anything can be animated in Unity.

Also Unity 3D offers a free version so developers can release games made with Unity Personal without paying for the software, so long as they make less than $100,000 from games made with Unity.

For those willing to pay, Unity offers some extra features and a flexible licensing plan under a tiered subscription model. Premium users will have access to Unity’s source code and developer support as well.

Because Unity has been around since 2005 it has developed a massive following of users and an amazing library of resources. Not only does Unity have fantastic documentation, but the sheer wealth of videos & tutorials online is staggering.

Beginners are wise to start with Unity for this reason alone. Among a laundry list of video game engines Unity serves as a portal of knowledge and resources built solely on their incredible community.

Unity 3D comes loaded with a ton of professional tools for both programmers and artists.

Unity provides a workspace that combines artist-friendly tools with a component-driven design that makes game development pretty darn intuitive.

Both 2D and 3D development is possible in Unity, with 2D physics handled by the popular Box2D engine.

Unity uses a component-based approach to game dev revolving around prefabs. With prefabs, game designers can build objects and environments more efficiently and scale faster.

With powerful shaders, physics-based materials, post-processing, and high-resolution lighting systems, Unity can deliver impressive graphics across the board.

Everyone from Ubisoft to NASA is utilizing Unity’s VR technology too.

For the platform itself: Unity was built in C++ and optimized over the years for performance. Premium users will have access to Unity’s source code for even greater opportunities.

Cross-platform deployment is a major draw for today’s developers and Unity shines in this area. With support for every major console and operating system, games developed in Unity can be deployed to absolutely any platform.

With Unity’s editor tools you can simultaneously handle inputs for mice, keyboards, and game controllers.

There’s also some pretty strong support for cloud-based solutions for multiplayer games with server hosting and scalable matchmaking, making it an all-in-one solution to multiplier experiences.

Team collaboration has been greatly improved in the newer versions of Unity. Built-in version control and cloud integration make working with others easier than ever before.

And Unity has a customizable editor with full API support for building your own editor tools and scripts. Make almost any tool you want to have for Unity, with Unity.

And it’s definitely worth mentioning the asset store which contains thousands of models, scripts, scenes, materials, and everything else you could want. You can even sell your own assets on the Unity store.

Truly one of the strongest communities you’ll find in the 3D space.

We’ve already discussed some features available in Unity, but the question remains: why choose Unity 3D over other engines like Unreal, GameMaker, or Godot?

For starters, Unity is a good all-around engine that can handle almost anyone’s needs. Unity is great for prototyping games as well.

The prefab system makes it easy to reuse code and assets from other projects and edit them for new purposes.

Building complex worlds in Unity 3D becomes a matter of assembling many components that are made up of their own components.

But the main reason to choose Unity is the huge library of resources available to everyone. Even experienced developers can save time and learn a lot from the community.

Unity also offers a robust set of cloud-based tools to easily monetize your game and add multiplayer capabilities.

With Unity Analytics, Unity Ads, Unity Collaborate, and Unity Multiplayer, users have access to an incredibly coinvent set of tools for creating dynamic games, all in one place. Very few other game engines offer this much centralization.

On the downside: Unity’s multi-purpose approach makes it clunkier than engines with more focus.

Creating 2D games in Unity is more painful than using Godot or GameMaker, while Unreal’s rendering and lighting systems are more capable than Unity’s.

Unity also blocks features for those unwilling(or unable) to buy the premier version. Most will not have access to the source code which can make Unity seem like a black box.

As game engines go, Unity 3D is rather large.

Even a blank project will often be larger than some games because there’s a lot of bloat that comes with using an engine like Unity. If you’re looking for lean & mean you may want to look somewhere else.

Also one other big negative is that Unity’s licensing system can be confusing. For instance: the program is free unless you make over $100,000 from your sales, in which case you’ll need to purchase a subscription plan which can also be confusing to understand the tiered pricing they require.

Other engines offer more straight-forward agreements and can be easier if money is a serious concern.

Unity offers several pricing tiers including personal, plus, and pro.

While the free version will get you started, you’ll want to upgrade to plus or pro if you’re serious about making commercial games.

Those not paying the monthly subscription will need to show earnings of less than $100,000 for the games they develop with Unity.

Hobbyists can upgrade to the Plus plan to gain access to more features and training materials, all of which help monetize their games and improve performance. This is fantastic for indie developers just starting their careers.

The Pro tier is designed for game studios and professional teams who need in-house support as well as those who make more than $200,000 from their Unity projects.

So even though licensing can be a bit confusing, there really is a license for everyone.

I’ve been using Unity 3D for many years so I can offer personal opinions and gotchas when it comes to Unity.

First, I think Unity is a great engine. It’s not the best, but it’s a wonderful, well-rounded tool and it’s excellent for beginners.

Second, there is no best game engine.

There are only tools for the job. Some are better than others and it really depends on the needs of the individual project.

While you’ll need coding skills to take full advantage of Unity, there are resources available for learning anything you want.

With a quick Google search you can find code samples and assets for everything from first-person shooters to candy-crush style matching games and everything inbetween. Although there is good reason to learn coding alongside 3D/CG work too.

Unity is, essentially, a well-rounded game engine that truly does simplify game development.

While there may be better engines to choose depending on the needs of your project, learning Unity will only help you grow as a game developer.

If you’re a total beginner: choose Unity because the community will help you learn and the tools will be sufficient for a long time.

If you’re more advanced then you may choose to go with Unity because of the cross-platform deployment options and the streamlined development process. Keep in mind that many AAA game studios work with Unity so it’s a quality choice in the massive world of video games.

How to Make Beautiful Terrain in Unity 2020 | Beginner Tutorial
How to Make Beautiful Terrain in Unity 2020 | Beginner Tutorial

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Unity 3D là gì và nó được sử dụng để làm gì? Học lập trình game unity tại IMIC

Unity đơn giản là công cụ trò chơi phổ biến nhất thế giới. Nó kết hợp rất nhiều tính năng với nhau và đủ linh hoạt để thực hiện hầu hết mọi trò chơi mà bạn có thể tưởng tượng.Với các tính năng đa nền tảng, Unity nổi tiếng với cả hobby developers and AAA studios. Nó được sử dụng để tạo ra các trò chơi như Pokemon Go, Heathstone, Rimworld, Cuphead, và nhiều hơn nữa.Mặc dù 3D có tên, Unity 3D cũng đóng gói các công cụ để phát triển trò chơi 2D.Các lập trình viên thích nó vì nó tích hợp C# scripting API và Visual Studio. Unity cũng cung cấp JavaScript như scripting language và MonoDevelop như một IDE cho những ai muốn một sự thay thế cho Visual Studio.Các chuyên viên thiết kế cũng thích nó vì nó đi kèm với các công cụ rất mạnh giúp đơn giản để tạo các đoạn cắt cảnh 3D hoặc xây dựng hoạt hình 2D. Gần như bất cứ điều gì cũng có thể được thể hiện một cách sống động trong Unity.Ngoài ra Unity 3D cung cấp phiên bản miễn phí để các nhà phát triển có thể phát hành các trò chơi được tạo bằng Unity Personal mà không phải trả tiền cho phần mềm, miễn là họ kiếm được ít hơn 100.000 đô la từ các trò chơi được tạo bằng Unity.Đối với những người sẵn sàng trả tiền, Unity cung cấp một số tính năng bổ sung và các gói linh hoạt theo cấp bậc đăng ký. Người dùng cao cấp cũng sẽ có quyền truy cập vào mã nguồn của Unity và hỗ trợ nhà phát triển.Bởi vì Unity đã xuất hiện từ năm 2005, nó đã phát triển một lượng lớn người dùng và một thư viện tài nguyên tuyệt vời. Unity không chỉ có tài liệu tuyệt vời, mà sự phong phú của các video và hướng dẫn trực tuyến cũng rất đáng kinh ngạc.Tính năng thống nhấtUnity 3D được trang bị rất nhiều công cụ chuyên nghiệp cho cả lập trình viên và chuyên viên thiết kế.Unity cung cấp một không gian làm việc kết hợp các công cụ thân thiện với chuyên viên thiết kế, giúp phát triển trò chơi môt cách khá trực quan.Cả hai 2D and 3D development đều có thể có trong Unity, với 2D được xử lý bởi công cụ Box2D phổ biến .Unity sử dụng prefabs giúp các game designers có thể xây dựng các đối tượng và môi trường hiệu quả hơn và mở rộng quy mô nhanh hơn.Với powerful shaders, physics-based materials, post-processing, and high-resolution lighting systems, Unity có thể cung cấp đồ họa một cách ấn tượng.Mọi người từ Ubisoft đến NASA cũng đang sử dụng công nghệ VR của Unity.Đối với bản thân nền tảng: Unity được xây dựng trong C ++ và được tối ưu hóa qua nhiều năm cho hiệu suất. Người dùng cao cấp sẽ có quyền truy cập vào mã nguồn của Unity để có cơ hội lớn hơn.Triển khai đa nền tảng là một lợi thế lớn cho các developers và Unity đang nổi lên trong lĩnh vực này. Với sự hỗ trợ cho mọi console và hệ điều hành chính , các trò chơi được phát triển trong Unity có thể được triển khai cho mọi nền tảng.Ngoài ra còn có một số hỗ trợ khá mạnh mẽ cho các giải pháp dựa trên đám mây, hỗ trợ các trò chơi nhiều người với máy chủ lưu trữ và những kết hợp có thể mở rộng, tất cả điều đó đều nằm trong một giải pháp.Hợp tác nhóm đã được cải thiện rất nhiều trong các phiên bản mới hơn của Unity. Kiểm soát phiên bản tích hợp và tích hợp đám mây giúp làm việc với những người khác dễ dàng hơn bao giờ hết.Và Unity có trình chỉnh sửa tùy chỉnh với hỗ trợ API đầy đủ để xây dựng các công cụ và tập lệnh biên tập của riêng bạn. Tạo hầu hết mọi công cụ bạn muốn có cho Unity, với Unity.Và nó chắc chắn đáng được đề cập đến asset store chứa hàng ngàn models scripts, scenes, materials và mọi thứ khác bạn muốn. Bạn thậm chí có thể bán tài sản của riêng bạn trên cửa hàng Unity.

Tại sao bạn nên học Lập trình Game Unity3D ngay hôm nay?

👉 “Game” hẳn là một từ khóa đã rất quen thuộc với mọi người và sẽ còn thú vị hơn nữa khi chính bạn có thể tạo ra các sản phẩm Game đó. 👉 Hiểu được điều đó IMIC đã tổ chức ra khóa đào tạo nhân sự lập trình Game với Unity3D.👉 Đây là khóa đào tạo toàn diện nhất về lập trình Game Unity3D.👉 Khóa đào tạo này sẽ trang bị cho các bạn đầy đủ các kỹ năng, kiến thức chuyên môn nền tảng về Unity3D, cách mà chúng ta sử dụng nó để phát triển trò chơi đa nền tảng mạnh mẽ.👉 Đây là nền tảng phát triển Game 3D & 2D chất lượng cao, sử dụng trên thiết bị di động, máy tính để bàn, VR/AR, các hệ máy Console như PS4, XBOX và Nintendo Switch hoặc Web, khả năng là vô tận.👉 Nếu bạn muốn tạo ra một trò chơi tương tác hấp dẫn và hình ảnh sinh động thì Unity 3D là một nền tảng nổi bật hỗ trợ các nhà phát triển các tính năng và tùy chọn chơi game theo cách hấp dẫn nhất. Việc lập trình ứng dụng game của bạn trở nên dễ dàng hơn khi thế giới ảo hiện ra sống động.👉 Và điều đặc biệt là bạn được học & làm dự án Game 2D, 3D cùng Chuyên gia có nhiều năm kinh nghiệm phát triển & quản lý dự án Game.

Dưới đây là những điều tuyệt vời và bạn nên học lập trình Game Unity3D ngay hôm nay!.✅ Unity 3D bao gồm một phiên bản hoàn toàn miễn phí để các lập trình viên có thể sử dụng để tạo ra các sản phẩm game với nhiều tính năng nổi bật.✅ Unity 3D hỗ trợ IOS, Android, Mac, PC, Steam và thậm chí cả các hệ máy Console. Có thể hiểu, bạn có thể tạo ra trò chơi cho tất cả các nền tảng và thiết kế trò chơi một cách dễ dàng. Với Unity, việc nâng cấp các phiên bản trò chơi cũng trở nên dễ dàng hơn.✅ Quá trình phát triển trò chơi rất phức tạp và bạn sẽ cần đến sự hỗ trợ từ cộng đồng các nhà phát triển, với hơn 3 triệu lập trình viên Unity và tăng nhanh mỗi ngày, các vấn đề bạn gặp phải sẽ được giải quyết nhanh chóng với nhiều giải pháp tốt cho bạn.✅ Unity Asset Store cung cấp cho các nhà phát triển 1 kho thư viện đồ sộ như: nhân vật, xe cộ, cây cối, tòa nhà,…✅ Bạn có thể viết kịch bản để phát triển Game Unity 3D với sự trợ giúp của Javascript hoặc C#, những ngôn ngữ kịch bản mà không quá khó để làm chủ nó.✅ Unity 3D được biết đến với sự sống động 3D, nhưng nó cũng rất hiệu quả khi phát triển Game 2D cho PC, điện thoại di động và thậm chí cho máy chơi game. Có thể dễ dàng thực hiện chuyển động sprite, thực hiện khoa học vật lý của thế giới 2D và làm nhiều hơn thế nữa.✅ Phần tốt nhất về Unity là có rất nhiều bài viết hướng dẫn và video đào tạo phát triển game có sẵn trên web cho bất kỳ ai muốn tìm hiểu.✅ Người học chỉ cần dành 1 thời gian ngắn tìm hiểu là đã có thể tạo ra các trò chơi nhỏ với một số tính năng thú vị rồi.✅ Hàng năm luôn có các hội thảo được tổ chức để công bố các tiện ích cho các nhà phát triển và tạo sự kết nối mọi người trong cộng đồng để cùng phát triển lĩnh vực Game với Unity 3D.✅ Và một điều đặc biệt nữa là nhu cầu tuyển dụng lập trình viên phát triển Game Unity 3D ở việt nam đang cần rất nhiều, cơn khát nhân sự này không chỉ hiện tại và còn kéo dài nhiều năm tiếp theo.

📣 Trước tình hình dịch bệnh Covid diễn biến còn phức tạp như hiện nay, thì để tạo điều kiện tốt nhất cho các bạn học viên có niềm đam mê yêu thích về lập trình Game Unity3D, Phòng đào tạo nhân sự của IMIC đưa ra chính sách hỗ trợ kinh phí với mức tốt nhất. Liên hệ ngay để được tư vấn đăng ký tham gia khóa đào tạo này.

Cảm ơn bạn đã dành thời gian lắng nghe những chia sẻ về Unity3D. Và tuyệt vời hơn nữa nếu IMIC được góp phần vào sự thành công của bạn!

Bạn đang muốn tìm kiếm 1 công việc với mức thu nhập cao.✅ Hoặc là bạn đang muốn chuyển đổi công việc mà chưa biết theo học ngành nghề gì cho tốt.✅ Giới thiệu với bạn Chương trình đào tạo nhân sự dài hạn trong 12 tháng với những điều đặc biệt mà chỉ có tại IMIC và đây cũng chính là sự lựa chọn phù hợp nhất dành cho bạn:👉 Thứ nhất: Học viên được đào tạo bài bản kỹ năng, kiến thức chuyên môn lý thuyết, thực hành, thực chiến nhiều dự án và chia sẻ những kinh nghiệm thực tế từ Chuyên gia có nhiều năm kinh nghiệm dự án cũng như tâm huyết truyền nghề.👉 Thứ hai: Được ký hợp đồng cam kết chất lượng đào tạo cũng như mức lương sau tốt nghiệp và đi làm tại các đối tác tuyển dụng của IMIC. Trả lại học phí nếu không đúng những gì đã ký kết.👉 Thứ ba: Cam kết hỗ trợ giới thiệu công việc sang đối tác tuyển dụng trong vòng 10 năm liên tục.👉 Thứ tư: Được hỗ trợ tài chính với mức lãi suất 0 đồng qua ngân hàng VIB Bank.👉 Có 4 Chương trình đào tạo nhân sự dài hạn dành cho bạn lựa chọn theo học. Gồm có:1) Data Scientist full-stack2) Embedded System & IoT development full-stack3) Game development full-stack4) Web development full-stack✅ Cảm ơn bạn đã dành thời gian lắng nghe những chia sẻ của mình. Và tuyệt vời hơn nữa nếu IMIC được góp phần vào sự thành công của bạn.✅ Hãy liên hệ ngay với Phòng tư vấn tuyển sinh để được hỗ trợ về thủ tục nhập học.✅ Chúc bạn luôn có nhiều sức khỏe và thành công!

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How to Animate Characters in Unity 3D | Animator Explained
How to Animate Characters in Unity 3D | Animator Explained

But Wait, I Want More!

This article serves as an overview of the architecture and process in Unity. I covered the interface, basics of assigning code, GameObjects, components, Mono and .NET, plus more. This sets us up nicely for the next article where I’ll dive right into assembling game components for a 2D game. Keep an eye on Microsoft Virtual Academy, as I’ll be doing a two-day Unity learning event late summer. And watch for local regional learning events at unity3d.com/pages/windows/events.

Adam Tuliper is a senior technical evangelist with Microsoft living in sunny Southern California. He’s an indie game dev, co-admin of the Orange County Unity Meetup, and a pluralsight.com author. He and his wife are about to have their third child, so reach out to him while he still has a spare moment at [email protected] or on Twitter at twitter.com/AdamTuliper.

Thanks to the following technical experts for reviewing this article: Matt Newman (Subscience Studios), Jaime Rodriguez (Microsoft) and Tautvydas Žilys (Unity)

Unity 3D là gì? Học lập trình game dễ dàng với Unity-Teky

Phát triển phần mềm game hiện nay đang trở thành một xu thế ngành nghề phổ biến. Bên cạnh cơ hội việc làm rộng mở, ngành nghề này còn giúp các lập trình game tạo ra mức thu nhập khủng. Vậy, làm thế nào để bắt đầu con đường này? Hãy cùng Teky khám phá Unity 3D là gì? Tại sao có thể trở thành chuyên gia lập trình game dễ dàng với Unity.

Hướng dẫn cài đặt phần mềm cùng học unity 3D

  • Sau khi tải về và cài đặt thì sẽ có giao diện như thế này:
Giao diện Unity 3D

Các bạn vào phần Insfalls -> Chọn ADD -> chọn phiên bản Unity muốn cài đặt -> Next -> chọn 2 phần đó là Microsoft Visual Studio Community 2019 và Documentation -> chọn I have read and agree with the above terms and conditions -> Done.

Hướng dẫn cài đặt Unity 3D

Sau khi cài đặt xong, chọn Projects -> New -> ở phần Templates chọn 2D hoặc 3D, phần Settings đặt tên project và chọn vị trí lưu -> sau khi hoàn tất nhấn Create.

Sau khi mở Unity các bạn chọn Edit -> Preferences… -> tại External Tools, ở phần External Script Editor chọn Visual Studio 2019 (Community).

The Future of Unity’s Game Engine
The Future of Unity’s Game Engine

Architecture and Compilation

Unity is a native C++-based game engine. You write code in C#, JavaScript (UnityScript) or, less frequently, Boo. Your code, not the Unity engine code, runs on Mono or the Microsoft .NET Framework, which is Just-in-Time (JIT) compiled (except for iOS, which doesn’t allow JIT code and is compiled by Mono to native code using Ahead-of-Time [AOT] compilation).

Unity lets you test your game in the IDE without having to perform any kind of export or build. When you run code in Unity, you’re using Mono version 3.5, which has API compatibility roughly on par with that of the .NET Framework 3.5/CLR 2.0.

You edit your code in Unity by double-clicking on a code file in the project view, which opens the default cross-platform editor, MonoDevelop. If you prefer, you can configure Visual Studio as your editor.

You debug with MonoDevelop or use a third-party plug-in for Visual Studio, UnityVS. You can’t use Visual Studio as a debugger without UnityVS because when you debug your game, you aren’t debugging Unity.exe, you’re debugging a virtual environment inside of Unity, using a soft debugger that’s issued commands and performs actions.

To debug, you launch MonoDevelop from Unity. MonoDevelop has a plug-in that opens a connection back to the Unity debugger and issues commands to it after you Debug | Attach to Process in MonoDevelop. With UnityVS, you connect the Visual Studio debugger back to Unity instead.

When you open Unity for the first time, you see the project dialog shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2 The Unity Project Wizard

In the project dialog, you specify the name and location for your project (1). You can import any packages into your project (2), though you don’t have to check anything off here; the list is provided only as a convenience. You can also import a package later. A package is a .unitypackage file that contains prepackaged resources—models, code, scenes, plug-ins—anything in Unity you can package up—and you can reuse or distribute them easily. Don’t check something off here if you don’t know what it is, though; your project size will grow, sometimes considerably. Finally, you can choose either 2D or 3D (3). This dropdown is relatively new to Unity, which didn’t have significant 2D game tooling until fairly recently. When set to 3D, the defaults favor a 3D project—typical Unity behavior as it’s been for ages, so it doesn’t need any special mention. When 2D is chosen, Unity changes a few seemingly small—but major—things, which I’ll cover in the 2D article later in this series.

This list is populated from .unitypackage files in certain locations on your system; Unity provides a handful on install. Anything you download from the Unity asset store also comes as a .unitypackage file and is cached locally on your system in C:\Users\

\AppData\Roaming\Unity\Asset Store. As such, it will show up in this list once it exists on your system. You could just double-click on any .unitypackage file and it would be imported into your project.

Continuing with the Unity interface, I’ll go forward from clicking Create in the dialog in Figure 2 so a new project is created. The default Unity window layout is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3 The Default Unity Window

Here’s what you’ll see:

  1. Project: All the files in your project. You can drag and drop from Explorer into Unity to add files to your project.
  2. Scene: The currently open scene.
  3. Hierarchy: All the game objects in the scene. Note the use of the term GameObjects and the GameObjects dropdown menu.
  4. Inspector: The components (properties) of the selected object in the scene.
  5. Toolbar: To the far left are Pan, Move, Rotate, Scale and in the center Play, Pause, Advance Frame. Clicking Play plays the game near instantly without having to perform separate builds. Pause pauses the game, and advance frame runs it one frame at a time, giving you very tight debugging control.
  6. Console: This window can become somewhat hidden, but it shows output from your compile, errors, warnings and so forth. It also shows debug messages from code; for example, Debug.Log will show its output here.

Of important mention is the Game tab next to the Scene tab. This tab activates when you click play and your game starts to run in this window. This is called play mode and it gives you a playground for testing your game, and even allows you to make live changes to the game by switching back to the Scene tab. Be very careful here, though. While the play button is highlighted, you’re in play mode and when you leave it, any changes you made while in play mode will be lost. I, along with just about every Unity developer I’ve ever spoken with, have lost work this way, so I change my Editor’s color to make it obvious when I’m in play mode via Edit | Preferences | Colors | Playmode tint.

Keywords searched by users: what is unity 3d

Application Development On Unity 3D Engine | Download Scientific Diagram
Application Development On Unity 3D Engine | Download Scientific Diagram
Tìm Hiểu Unity3D – Engine Game Đa Nền Tảng Xuất Sắc Hiện Nay
Tìm Hiểu Unity3D – Engine Game Đa Nền Tảng Xuất Sắc Hiện Nay
Iclone Characters To Unity3D Part One: Character Creation - Youtube
Iclone Characters To Unity3D Part One: Character Creation – Youtube
Maps Sdk For Unity: 3D Worlds, Ar, & Pois | Mapbox
Maps Sdk For Unity: 3D Worlds, Ar, & Pois | Mapbox

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