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Visual Studio 2017 C Project | Powerful Productivity Features

C# Tutorial | Setting Up Visual Studio 2017

Visual Studio 2017 Installation

In Visual Studio 2017, it’s easy to choose and install just the features you need. And because of its reduced minimum footprint, it installs quickly and with less system impact.

Prerequisites

  • A broadband internet connection. The Visual Studio installer can download several gigabytes of data.

  • A computer that runs Microsoft Windows 7 or later versions. We recommend the latest version of Windows for the best development experience. Make sure that the latest updates are applied to your system before you install Visual Studio.

  • Enough free disk space. Visual Studio requires at least 7 GB of disk space, and can take 50 GB or more if many common options are installed. We recommend you install it on your C: drive.

For details on the disk space and operating system requirements, see Visual Studio Product Family System Requirements. The installer reports how much disk space is required for the options you select.

Download and install

  1. To download the latest Visual Studio 2017 installer for Windows, go to the Microsoft Visual Studio Older downloads page. Expand the 2017 section, and choose the Download button.

    Tip

    The Community edition is for individual developers, classroom learning, academic research, and open source development. For other uses, install Visual Studio 2017 Professional or Visual Studio 2017 Enterprise.

  2. Find the installer file you downloaded and run it. The downloaded file might be displayed in your browser, or you might find it in your Downloads folder. The installer needs Administrator privileges to run. You might see a User Account Control dialog asking you to give permission to let the installer make changes to your system; choose Yes. If you’re having trouble, find the downloaded file in File Explorer, right-click on the installer icon, and choose Run as Administrator from the context menu.

  3. The installer presents you with a list of workloads, which are groups of related options for specific development areas. Support for C++ is now part of optional workloads that aren’t installed by default.

    For C and C++, select the Desktop development with C++ workload and then choose Install.

  4. When the installation completes, choose the Launch button to start Visual Studio.

    The first time you run Visual Studio, you’re asked to sign in with a Microsoft Account. If you don’t have one, you can create one for free. You must also choose a theme. Don’t worry, you can change it later if you want to.

    It might take Visual Studio several minutes to get ready for use the first time you run it. Here’s what it looks like in a quick time-lapse:

    Visual Studio starts faster when you run it again.

  5. When Visual Studio opens, check to see if the flag icon in the title bar is highlighted:

    If it’s highlighted, select it to open the Notifications window. If there are any updates available for Visual Studio, we recommend you install them now. Once the installation is complete, restart Visual Studio.

Visual Studio 2015 Installation

To install Visual Studio 2015, go to the Microsoft Visual Studio Older downloads page. Expand the 2015 section, and choose the Download button. Run the downloaded setup program and choose Custom installation and then choose the C++ component. To add C and C++ support to an existing Visual Studio 2015 installation, click on the Windows Start button and type Add Remove Programs. Open the program from the results list and then find your Visual Studio 2015 installation in the list of installed programs. Double-click it, then choose Modify and select the Visual C++ components to install.

In general, we highly recommend that you use the latest version of Visual Studio even if you need to compile your code using the Visual Studio 2015 compiler. For more information, see Use native multi-targeting in Visual Studio to build old projects.

When Visual Studio is running, you’re ready to continue to the next step.

C# Tutorial | Setting Up Visual Studio 2017
C# Tutorial | Setting Up Visual Studio 2017

Modern C++ Support

Build apps using C++11, C++14, and C++17

Enjoy support for C++11, C++14 and many C++17 features with market leading performance, build throughput and security. Write code using the power of generic lambda expressions, resumable functions, decltype (auto), extended constexpr and C++ attributes, fold expressions, noexcept in type system, inline variables and other modern features.

Write Linux apps and debug them in real-time

Take advantage of powerful coding and debugging tools to manage code targeting Linux built with GCC, Clang, or another compiler. Debug your Linux applications as they run remotely with GDB. Whether you are building IoT apps or high-performance computing cloud services for Linux, Visual Studio will help you be productive.

Target Android and iOS while staying productive

Leverage the power of Visual Studio 2022 and the debugger to build high-performance Android and/or iOS apps and games in C++, share C++ libraries to target both mobile platforms and Windows, or write once and run across all mobile platforms with Xamarin and C++.

Join the many AAA top game studios already using Visual Studio

Create high-performance games with DirectX to run on Windows devices, or build cross-platform games with a top game engine, such as Unity, Unreal, and Cocos. Join the many wildly-successful game studios that already use Visual Studio to boost your productivity with Visual Studio 2022 and the world-class debugger.

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Develop C and C++ applications

Build modern C and C++ apps for Windows using tools of your choice, including MSVC, Clang, CMake, and MSBuild

Install the components you need for building C and C++ apps

  • Contains C/C++ components for desktop, mobile, Linux, and game development
  • Get a light and simplified installation
  • Add more components during installation, or

By downloading, you agree to the licensing terms for the Visual Studio edition you select below. We also offer the ability to download software with Visual Studio. This software is licensed separately, as set out in the 3rd Party Notices or in its accompanying license. By downloading, you also agree to those licenses.

How to create C programs using Visual Studio 2017
How to create C programs using Visual Studio 2017

Unparalleled Debugging and Diagnostics

Write the best, bug-free code

Do all the basics like setting breakpoints and stepping through your code, then get more advanced with variable visualization, performance profiling, debugging any local or remote process, and multi-threaded application debugging. Run to click, edit your live code and continue executing without having to rebuild.

Example

The following sample .vcxproj file was produced by choosing Windows Desktop Wizard in the New Project dialog box. To process a project file use either the msbuild.exe tool at the command line, or the Build command in the IDE. (This sample cannot be processed because the required source and header files are not provided.) For more information about the XML elements in a project file, see Project File Schema Reference.

The following sample .vcxproj file was produced by specifying a Win32 Console Application in the New Project dialog box. To process a project file use either the msbuild.exe tool at the command line, or the Build command in the IDE. (This sample cannot be processed because the required source and header files are not provided.) For more information about the XML elements in a project file, see Project File Schema Reference.

Note

For projects in Visual Studio 2017 and earlier, change

pch.h

to

stdafx.h

and

pch.cpp

to

stdafx.cpp

.



Debug
Win32

Release
Win32
{96F21549-A7BF-4695-A1B1-B43625B91A14}
Win32Proj


SomeProjName

Application


Unicode

Application


true


Unicode
true false
Use
Level3


true


EditAndContinue


Disabled


EnableFastChecks


MultiThreadedDebugDLL
WIN32;_DEBUG;_CONSOLE;%(PreprocessorDefinitions)


Console


true





Level3
Use
ProgramDatabase


MaxSpeed


MultiThreadedDLL


true


true
WIN32;NDEBUG;_CONSOLE;%(PreprocessorDefinitions)


Console


true


true


true



Create Create

How to Create and Run C Program in Visual Studio
How to Create and Run C Program in Visual Studio

Compile and run a project

To compile and run the new project, press F5 or click the debug dropdown with the green arrow on the main toolbar. The configuration dropdown is where you choose whether to perform a Debug or Release build (or some other custom configuration).

A new project compiles without errors. When adding your own code, you might occasionally introduce an error or trigger a warning. An error prevents the build from completing; a warning doesn’t. All errors and warnings appear both in the Output Window and in the Error List when you build the project.

In the Error List, you can press F1 on the highlighted error to go to its documentation topic.

This document is for compiling projects using C. If you wish to use C++, see Building a Microsoft Visual Studio C++ Project for Your c-tree Application.

To compile C programs with Microsoft Visual Studio, you must have the C++ component installed. This seems counter-intuitive, but the C++ component includes both the C compiler and the C++ compiler.

The New Project Wizard in modern versions of Microsoft Visual Studio does not contain templates that explicitly create C projects — all of the C-type templates specify C++ as the programming language (see the following picture). A workaround is required to create a new C project. The workaround involves adding a new C++ file to your project, but changing the filename’s extension from .cpp to .c before you press the button that actually creates the new file.

This workaround works because the default behavior of Visual Studio is to compile source code files that have a “.c” file name extension as C, and to compile files that have a .cpp extension as C++. As long as your source code file names all end in .c, Visual Studio will use the C compiler (and not the C++ compiler) to compile them. Note that this default behavior can be changed for a project by going to the project’s Properties window and navigating to Configuration Properties > C/C++ > Advanced, and then changing the Compile As entry from Default to Compile as C Code (/TC).

With this background, the steps to create a new c-treeDB project in Visual Studio are as follows:

Explicit details of these steps follow.

What you most likely actually want to do is create a project. Go to File-> New-> Project. Most likely, the first programs you will write are console applications (meaning they appear on that screen that resembles an old computer monitor, or what some computer screens look like when booting). If you want to create a console application, go from Project to Visual C++-> Windows Desktop-> Windows Console Application. Ignore any additional pop-up windows and just keep clicking continue. A file called main.cpp will automatically be generated. This is the file you will want to use for your code examples (but DO NOT DELETE the

#include "stdafx.h"

line, even if your example code does not have it).

Visual Studio compiles both .c and .cpp files as C++ by default. C++ has nearly everything that C has, but may take longer to compile when dealing with huge projects. If you want to use strictly C with no C++, then go to Project (a separate project tab on the same toolbar as the file tab — it isn’t within the file tab)-> ProjectName(Your Project Name) Properties-> Configuration Properties-> C/C++-> Advanced and select “Compile As”. You should see a square with a upside-down “^” in it. Click that and select “Compile as C Code (/TC)”. The “/TC” is just what you would type in if you were using command-line arguments instead of the convenient window that appears for you to modify everything. Finally, rename main.cpp to main.c.

Since you’re learning C, I would also like to mention that I started making a C tutorial on my web site (and if anybody else also happens to see this post and the tutorial, criticize the tutorial as harshly as you can in the comments below).

Visual Studio projects – C++

A Visual Studio project is a collection of code files and assets such as icons, images, and so on, that are built together using the MSBuild build system. MSBuild is the native build system for Visual Studio and is generally the best build system to use for Windows-specific programs. MSBuild is tightly integrated with Visual Studio, but you can also use it from the command line.

For information about upgrading MSBuild projects from older versions of Visual Studio, see the Microsoft C++ Porting and Upgrading Guide.

For cross-platform projects, or projects that use open-source libraries, we recommend using CMake projects in Visual Studio in Visual Studio 2017 and later.

How to create C programs using latest Visual Studio 2017 version 15.3+
How to create C programs using latest Visual Studio 2017 version 15.3+

Create a Visual Studio C++ project

  1. Create a C++ project by choosing File > New > Project.

  2. In the Create a new project dialog, set the Language dropdown to C++. This filters the list of project templates to C++ projects. You can filter the templates by setting the Platform, Project Type, or by entering keywords in the search box.

  3. Select a project template, then choose Next.

  4. On the Configure your new project page, enter project-specific settings such as the project name or location and then choose Create to create your project.

  1. Create a C++ project by choosing File > New > Project.

  2. Choose Visual C++ in the left pane. In the center pane, a list of project templates appears:

For more information about the default project templates included in Visual Studio, see C++ project templates in Visual Studio.

You can create your own project templates. For more information, see How to: Create project templates.

After you create a project, it appears in the Solution Explorer window:

When you create a new project, a solution file (.sln) is also created. A Visual Studio solution is a collection of one or more projects. You can add another project to the solution by right-clicking the solution name in Solution Explorer > Add > New project.

The solution file coordinates build dependencies when you have multiple related projects. Compiler options are set at the project level.

Powerful Productivity Features

Browse, edit, and improve your code quickly

Visualize your code with syntax colorization, guidelines, code tooltips, Class View, or Call Hierarchy. Navigate to any code symbol by reference, definition, declaration, and more. Autocomplete your code as you type, quickly repair problems, and refactor your code to your needs. Analyze your code for common issues. Save time that could be better spent.

Project Files

A C++ project file in Visual Studio is an XML-based file that has the .vcxproj file name extension and contains information that is required to build a C++ project. Note that the project file imports various project files that have the “.props” or “.targets” extension. These files contain additional build information, and might themselves refer to other “.props” or “.targets” files. The macros in the file path (for example

$(VCTargetsPath)

) are dependent on your Visual Studio installation. For more information about these macros and “.props” and “.targets” files, see VC++ Directories Property Page, Set C++ compiler and build properties in Visual Studio and Common macros for build commands and properties.

How to create Setup.exe file in Visual Studio 2017 | FoxLearn
How to create Setup.exe file in Visual Studio 2017 | FoxLearn

Visual Studio 2022 Installation

Welcome to Visual Studio 2022! In this version, it’s easy to choose and install just the features you need. And because of its reduced minimum footprint, it installs quickly and with less system impact.

Note

This topic applies to installation of Visual Studio on Windows. Visual Studio Code is a lightweight, cross-platform development environment that runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux systems. The Microsoft C/C++ for Visual Studio Code extension supports IntelliSense, debugging, code formatting, auto-completion. Visual Studio for Mac doesn’t support Microsoft C++, but does support .NET languages and cross-platform development. For installation instructions, see Install Visual Studio for Mac.

Want to know more about what else is new in this version? See the Visual Studio release notes.

Ready to install? We walk you through it, step-by-step.

Step 1 – Make sure your computer is ready for Visual Studio

Before you begin installing Visual Studio:

  1. Check the system requirements. These requirements help you know whether your computer supports Visual Studio 2022.

  2. Apply the latest Windows updates. These updates ensure that your computer has both the latest security updates and the required system components for Visual Studio.

  3. Reboot. The reboot ensures that any pending installs or updates don’t hinder the Visual Studio install.

  4. Free up space. Remove unneeded files and applications from your %SystemDrive% by, for example, running the Disk Cleanup app.

For questions about running previous versions of Visual Studio side by side with Visual Studio 2022, see the Visual Studio 2022 Platform Targeting and Compatibility page.

Step 2 – Download Visual Studio

Next, download the Visual Studio bootstrapper file. To do so, choose the following button to go to the Visual Studio download page. Select the edition of Visual Studio that you want and choose the Free trial or Free download button.

Step 3 – Install the Visual Studio installer

Run the bootstrapper file you downloaded to install the Visual Studio Installer. This new lightweight installer includes everything you need to both install and customize Visual Studio.

  1. From your Downloads folder, double-click the bootstrapper that matches or is similar to one of the following files:

    • vs_community.exe for Visual Studio Community
    • vs_professional.exe for Visual Studio Professional
    • vs_enterprise.exe for Visual Studio Enterprise

    If you receive a User Account Control notice, choose Yes to allow the bootstrapper to run.

  2. We ask you to acknowledge the Microsoft License Terms and the Microsoft Privacy Statement. Choose Continue.

Step 4 – Choose workloads

After the installer is installed, you can use it to customize your installation by selecting the workloads, or feature sets, that you want. Here’s how.

  1. Find the workload you want in the Installing Visual Studio screen.

    For core C and C++ support, choose the “Desktop development with C++” workload. It comes with the default core editor, which includes basic code editing support for over 20 languages, the ability to open and edit code from any folder without requiring a project, and integrated source code control.

    Other workloads support more kinds of development. For example, choose the “Universal Windows Platform development” workload to create apps that use the Windows Runtime for the Microsoft Store. Choose “Game development with C++” to create games that use DirectX, Unreal, and Cocos2d. Choose “Linux development with C++” to target Linux platforms, including IoT development.

    The Installation details pane lists the included and optional components installed by each workload. You can select or deselect optional components in this list. For example, to support development by using the Visual Studio 2017 or 2015 compiler toolsets, choose the MSVC v141 or MSVC v140 optional components. You can add support for MFC, the experimental Modules language extension, IncrediBuild, and more.

  2. After you choose the workload(s) and optional components you want, choose Install.

    Next, status screens appear that show the progress of your Visual Studio installation.

Tip

At any time after installation, you can install workloads or components that you didn’t install initially. If you have Visual Studio open, go to Tools > Get Tools and Features… which opens the Visual Studio Installer. Or, open Visual Studio Installer from the Start menu. From there, you can choose the workloads or components that you wish to install. Then, choose Modify.

Step 5 – Choose individual components (Optional)

If you don’t want to use the Workloads feature to customize your Visual Studio installation, or you want to add more components than a workload installs, you can do so by installing or adding individual components from the Individual components tab. Choose what you want, and then follow the prompts.

Step 6 – Install language packs (Optional)

By default, the installer program tries to match the language of the operating system when it runs for the first time. To install Visual Studio in a language of your choosing, choose the Language packs tab from the Visual Studio Installer, and then follow the prompts.

Change the installer language from the command line

Another way that you can change the default language is by running the installer from the command line. For example, you can force the installer to run in English by using the following command:

vs_installer.exe --locale en-US

. The installer will remember this setting when it’s run the next time. The installer supports the following language tokens: zh-cn, zh-tw, cs-cz, en-us, es-es, fr-fr, de-de, it-it, ja-jp, ko-kr, pl-pl, pt-br, ru-ru, and tr-tr.

Step 7 – Change the installation location (Optional)

You can reduce the installation footprint of Visual Studio on your system drive. You can choose to move the download cache, shared components, SDKs, and tools to different drives, and keep Visual Studio on the drive that runs it the fastest.

Important

You can select a different drive only when you first install Visual Studio. If you’ve already installed it and want to change drives, you must uninstall Visual Studio and then reinstall it.

Step 8 – Start developing

  1. After Visual Studio installation is complete, choose the Launch button to get started developing with Visual Studio.

  2. On the start window, choose Create a new project.

  3. In the search box, enter the type of app you want to create to see a list of available templates. The list of templates depends on the workload(s) that you chose during installation. To see different templates, choose different workloads.

    You can also filter your search for a specific programming language by using the Language drop-down list. You can filter by using the Platform list and the Project type list, too.

  4. Visual Studio opens your new project, and you’re ready to code!

Add third-party libraries to a project

Over 900 C++ open source libraries are available via the vcpkg package manager. Run the Visual Studio integration step to set up the paths to that library when you reference it from any Visual Studio project.

For more information about consuming a library that you have downloaded by using the vcpkg package manager, see:

  • vcpkg in CMake projects
  • Install and use packages with CMake in Visual Studio
  • vcpkg in MSBuild projects
  • Tutorial: Install and use packages with MSBuild in Visual Studio

They’re also commercial third-party libraries that you can install. Follow their installation instructions.

How to create C projects in Visual Studio
How to create C projects in Visual Studio

Visual Studio 2019 Installation

Welcome to Visual Studio 2019! In this version, it’s easy to choose and install just the features you need. And because of its reduced minimum footprint, it installs quickly and with less system impact.

Note

This topic applies to installation of Visual Studio on Windows. Visual Studio Code is a lightweight, cross-platform development environment that runs on Windows, Mac, and Linux systems. The Microsoft C/C++ for Visual Studio Code extension supports IntelliSense, debugging, code formatting, auto-completion. Visual Studio for Mac doesn’t support Microsoft C++, but does support .NET languages and cross-platform development. For installation instructions, see Install Visual Studio for Mac.

Want to know more about what else is new in this version? See the Visual Studio release notes.

Ready to install? We walk you through it, step-by-step.

Step 1 – Make sure your computer is ready for Visual Studio

Before you begin installing Visual Studio:

  1. Check the system requirements. These requirements help you know whether your computer supports Visual Studio 2019.

  2. Apply the latest Windows updates. These updates ensure that your computer has both the latest security updates and the required system components for Visual Studio.

  3. Reboot. The reboot ensures that any pending installs or updates don’t hinder the Visual Studio install.

  4. Free up space. Remove unneeded files and applications from your %SystemDrive% by, for example, running the Disk Cleanup app.

For questions about running previous versions of Visual Studio side by side with Visual Studio 2019, see the Visual Studio 2019 Platform Targeting and Compatibility page.

Step 2 – Download Visual Studio

Next, download the Visual Studio bootstrapper file. To do so, choose the following button to go to the Visual Studio download page. Choose the Download button, then you can select the edition of Visual Studio that you want.

Step 3 – Install the Visual Studio installer

Run the bootstrapper file you downloaded to install the Visual Studio Installer. This new lightweight installer includes everything you need to both install and customize Visual Studio.

  1. From your Downloads folder, double-click the bootstrapper that matches or is similar to one of the following files:

    • vs_community.exe for Visual Studio Community
    • vs_professional.exe for Visual Studio Professional
    • vs_enterprise.exe for Visual Studio Enterprise

    If you receive a User Account Control notice, choose Yes to allow the bootstrapper to run.

  2. We ask you to acknowledge the Microsoft License Terms and the Microsoft Privacy Statement. Choose Continue.

Step 4 – Choose workloads

After the installer is installed, you can use it to customize your installation by selecting the workloads, or feature sets, that you want. Here’s how.

  1. Find the workload you want in the Installing Visual Studio screen.

    For core C and C++ support, choose the “Desktop development with C++” workload. It comes with the default core editor, which includes basic code editing support for over 20 languages, the ability to open and edit code from any folder without requiring a project, and integrated source code control.

    Other workloads support more kinds of development. For example, choose the “Universal Windows Platform development” workload to create apps that use the Windows Runtime for the Microsoft Store. Choose “Game development with C++” to create games that use DirectX, Unreal, and Cocos2d. Choose “Linux development with C++” to target Linux platforms, including IoT development.

    The Installation details pane lists the included and optional components installed by each workload. You can select or deselect optional components in this list. For example, to support development by using the Visual Studio 2017 or 2015 compiler toolsets, choose the MSVC v141 or MSVC v140 optional components. You can add support for MFC, the experimental Modules language extension, IncrediBuild, and more.

  2. After you choose the workload(s) and optional components you want, choose Install.

    Next, status screens appear that show the progress of your Visual Studio installation.

Tip

At any time after installation, you can install workloads or components that you didn’t install initially. If you have Visual Studio open, go to Tools > Get Tools and Features… which opens the Visual Studio Installer. Or, open Visual Studio Installer from the Start menu. From there, you can choose the workloads or components that you wish to install. Then, choose Modify.

Step 5 – Choose individual components (Optional)

If you don’t want to use the Workloads feature to customize your Visual Studio installation, or you want to add more components than a workload installs, you can do so by installing or adding individual components from the Individual components tab. Choose what you want, and then follow the prompts.

Step 6 – Install language packs (Optional)

By default, the installer program tries to match the language of the operating system when it runs for the first time. To install Visual Studio in a language of your choosing, choose the Language packs tab from the Visual Studio Installer, and then follow the prompts.

Change the installer language from the command line

Another way that you can change the default language is by running the installer from the command line. For example, you can force the installer to run in English by using the following command:

vs_installer.exe --locale en-US

. The installer will remember this setting when it’s run the next time. The installer supports the following language tokens: zh-cn, zh-tw, cs-cz, en-us, es-es, fr-fr, de-de, it-it, ja-jp, ko-kr, pl-pl, pt-br, ru-ru, and tr-tr.

Step 7 – Change the installation location (Optional)

You can reduce the installation footprint of Visual Studio on your system drive. You can choose to move the download cache, shared components, SDKs, and tools to different drives, and keep Visual Studio on the drive that runs it the fastest.

Important

You can select a different drive only when you first install Visual Studio. If you’ve already installed it and want to change drives, you must uninstall Visual Studio and then reinstall it.

Step 8 – Start developing

  1. After Visual Studio installation is complete, choose the Launch button to get started developing with Visual Studio.

  2. On the start window, choose Create a new project.

  3. In the search box, enter the type of app you want to create to see a list of available templates. The list of templates depends on the workload(s) that you chose during installation. To see different templates, choose different workloads.

    You can also filter your search for a specific programming language by using the Language drop-down list. You can filter by using the Platform list and the Project type list, too.

  4. Visual Studio opens your new project, and you’re ready to code!

Keywords searched by users: visual studio 2017 c project

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