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Python Visual Studio 2019 | Other Popular Python Extensions

Python Desktop Application in Visual Studio 2019 | IronPython Getting Started

Step 1: Create a new Python project

A project is how Visual Studio manages all the files that come together to produce a single application. Application files include source code, resources, and configurations. A project formalizes and maintains the relationships among all the project’s files. The project also manages external resources that are shared between multiple projects. A project allows your application to effortlessly expand and grow. Using projects is easier than managing relationships by hand in unplanned folders, scripts, text files, and your memory.

This tutorial begins with a simple project containing a single, empty code file.

  1. In Visual Studio, select File > New > Project to open the New Project dialog. You can also use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Shift+N. In the dialog, you can browse templates across different languages, select a template for your project, and specify where Visual Studio places files.

  2. To view Python templates, select Installed > Python on the left menu, or search for “Python.” The search option is a great way to find a template when you can’t remember its location in the languages tree.

    Python support in Visual Studio includes several project templates, including web applications using the Bottle, Flask, and Django frameworks. For the purposes of this walkthrough, however, let’s start with an empty project.

  3. Select the Python Application template, specify a name for the project, and select OK.

  1. In Visual Studio, select File > New > Project or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Shift+N. The Create a new project screen opens, where you can search and browse templates across different languages.

  2. To view Python templates, search for python. Search is a great way to find a template when you can’t remember its location in the languages tree.

    Python web support in Visual Studio includes several project templates, such as web applications in the Bottle, Flask, and Django frameworks. When you install Python with the Visual Studio Installer, select Python Web Support under Optional to install these templates. For this tutorial, start with an empty project.

  3. Select the Python Application template, and select Next.

  4. On the Configure your new project screen, specify a name and file location for the project, and then select Create.

After a few moments, your new project opens in Visual Studio:

Here’s what you see:

  • (1) The Visual Studio Solution Explorer window shows the project structure.
  • (2) The default code file opens in the editor.
  • (3) The Properties window shows more information for the item selected in Solution Explorer, including its exact location on disk.

Configure Python in Visual Studio 2019

We need to enable the Python while installing the Visual Studio 2019. If you already installed Visual Studio, then we can enable it using the Visual Studio installer. Steps are the same to enable Python for those who are installing new or updating the Visual Studio which we have installed already. Open the installer and select the “Python development” as shown below.

Python Desktop Application in Visual Studio 2019 | IronPython Getting Started
Python Desktop Application in Visual Studio 2019 | IronPython Getting Started

Other popular Python extensions

The Microsoft Python extension provides all of the features described previously in this article. Additional Python language support can be added to VS Code by installing other popular Python extensions.

  1. Open the Extensions view (⇧⌘X (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Shift+X)).
  2. Filter the extension list by typing ‘python’.

The extensions shown above are dynamically queried. Click on an extension tile above to read the description and reviews to decide which extension is best for you. See more in the Marketplace.

Testing

The Python extension supports testing with Python’s built-in unittest framework and pytest.

In order to run tests, you must enable one of the supported testing frameworks in the settings of your project. Each framework has its own specific settings, such as arguments for identifying the paths and patterns for test discovery.

Once the tests have been discovered, VS Code provides a variety of commands (on the Status Bar, the Command Palette, and elsewhere) to run and debug tests. These commands also allow you to run individual test files and methods

Python 3 with Visual Studio 2019 - Part 01 - setup environment
Python 3 with Visual Studio 2019 – Part 01 – setup environment

Set a working directory

By default, Visual Studio runs a Python project opened as a folder in the root of that same folder. The code in your project, however, might assume that Python is being run in a subfolder. For example, now suppose you open the root folder of the pythonkoans repository and there is a subfolder called python3 where _contemplate-koans.py exists. You set the python3/contemplate-koans.py file as startup item. If you then run the code, you would see an error that the koans.txt file can’t be found. This error happens because contemplate-koans.py assumes that Python is being run in the python3 folder rather than the repository root.

In such cases, you must also add a line to the launch configuration JSON file to specify the working directory:

  1. Right-click the Python (.py) startup file in Solution Explorer and select Debug and Launch Settings.

  2. In the Select debugger dialog box that appears, select Default and then choose Select.

    Note

    If you don’t see Default as a choice, be sure that you chose a Python .py file when selecting the Debug and Launch Settings command. Visual Studio uses the file type to determine which debugger options to display.

  3. Visual Studio opens a file named launch.vs.json, which is located in the hidden


    .vs

    folder. This file describes the debugging context for the project. To specify a working directory, add a value for

    "workingDirectory"

    , as in

    "workingDirectory": "python3"

    for python-koans example:

    { "version": "0.2.1", "defaults": {}, "configurations": [ { "type": "python", "interpreter": "(default)", "interpreterArguments": "", "scriptArguments": "", "env": {}, "nativeDebug": false, "webBrowserUrl": "", "project": "contemplate_koans.py", "projectTarget": "", "name": "contemplate_koans.py", "workingDirectory": "python3" } ] }

  4. Save the file and launch the program again, which now runs in the specified folder.

By default, Visual Studio runs a Python project opened as a folder in the root of that same folder. The code in your project, however, might assume that Python is being run in a subfolder. For example, now suppose you open the root folder of the pythonkoans repository and there is a subfolder called python3 where _contemplate-koans.py exists. You set the python3/contemplate-koans.py file as startup item. If you then run the code, you would see an error that the koans.txt file can’t be found. This error happens because contemplate-koans.py assumes that Python is being run in the python3 folder rather than the repository root.

In such cases, you must also add a line to the launch configuration JSON file to specify the working directory:

  1. Right-click the Python (.py) startup file in Solution Explorer and select Add Debug Configuration.

  2. In the Select debugger dialog box that appears, select Default and then choose Select.

    Note

    If you don’t see Default as a choice, be sure that you chose a Python .py file when selecting the Add Debug Configuration command. Visual Studio uses the file type to determine which debugger options to display.

  3. Visual Studio opens a file named launch.vs.json, which is located in the hidden


    .vs

    folder. This file describes the debugging context for the project. To specify a working directory, add a value for

    "workingDirectory"

    , as in

    "workingDirectory": "python3"

    for python-koans example:

    { "version": "0.2.1", "defaults": {}, "configurations": [ { "type": "python", "interpreter": "(default)", "interpreterArguments": "", "scriptArguments": "", "env": {}, "nativeDebug": false, "webBrowserUrl": "", "project": "contemplate_koans.py", "projectTarget": "", "name": "contemplate_koans.py", "workingDirectory": "python3" } ] }

  4. Save the file and launch the program again, which now runs in the specified folder.

Install packages using the Python Environments window

  1. From the Python Environments window, select the default environment for new Python projects and choose the Packages tab. You’ll then see a list of packages that are currently installed in the environment.

  2. Install


    matplotlib

    by entering its name into the search field and then selecting the Run command: pip install matplotlib option. Running the command will install

    matplotlib

    , and any packages it depends on (in this case that includes

    numpy

    ).

  3. Choose the Packages tab.

  4. Consent to elevation if prompted to do so.

  5. After the package is installed, it appears in the Python Environments window. The X to the right of the package uninstalls it.

  6. Consent to elevation if prompted to do so.

  7. After the package installs, it appears in the Python Environments window. The X to the right of the package uninstalls it.

    Note

    A small progress bar might appear underneath the environment to indicate that Visual Studio is building its IntelliSense database for the newly-installed package. The IntelliSense tab also shows more detailed information. Be aware that until that database is complete, IntelliSense features like auto-completion and syntax checking won’t be active in the editor for that package.

    Visual Studio 2017 version 15.6 and later uses a different and faster method for working with IntelliSense, and displays a message to that effect on the IntelliSense tab.

Python Web Application in Visual Studio 2019 | Getting Started
Python Web Application in Visual Studio 2019 | Getting Started

Run Python code

To experience Python, create a file (using the File Explorer) named

hello.py

and paste in the following code:


print("Hello World")

The Python extension then provides shortcuts to run Python code using the currently selected interpreter (Python: Select Interpreter in the Command Palette). To run the active Python file, click the Run Python File in Terminal play button in the top-right side of the editor.

You can also run individual lines or a selection of code with the Python: Run Selection/Line in Python Terminal command (Shift+Enter). If there isn’t a selection, the line with your cursor will be run in the Python Terminal. An identical Run Selection/Line in Python Terminal command is available on the context menu for a selection in the editor. The same terminal will be used every time you run a selection or a line in the terminal/REPL, until that terminal is closed. The same terminal is also used for Run Python File in Terminal. If that terminal is still running the REPL, you should exit the REPL (

exit()

) or switch to a different terminal before running a Python file.

The Python extension automatically removes indents based on the first non-empty line of the selection, shifting all other lines left as needed.

The command opens the Python Terminal if necessary; you can also open the interactive REPL environment directly using the Python: Start REPL command that activates a terminal with the currently selected interpreter and then runs the Python REPL.

For a more specific walkthrough and other ways of running code, see the run code tutorial.

Next steps

  • Python Hello World tutorial – Get started with Python in VS Code.
  • Editing Python – Learn about auto-completion, formatting, and refactoring for Python.
  • Basic Editing – Learn about the powerful VS Code editor.
  • Code Navigation – Move quickly through your source code.
  • Django tutorial
  • Flask tutorial
Visual Studio 2019 Launch: Python development with Visual Studio
Visual Studio 2019 Launch: Python development with Visual Studio

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Quickstart: Open and run Python code in a folder

Once you’ve installed Python support in Visual Studio 2019, it’s easy to run existing Python code in Visual Studio 2019 without creating a Visual Studio project.

Once you’ve installed Python support in Visual Studio 2022, it’s easy to run existing Python code in Visual Studio 2022 without creating a Visual Studio project.

Note

Visual Studio 2017 and earlier require you to create a Visual Studio project to run Python code, which you can easily do using a built-in project template. See Quickstart: Create a Python project from existing code.

  1. For this walkthrough, you can use any folder with Python code that you like. To follow along with the example shown here, clone the gregmalcolm/python_koans GitHub repository to your computer using the command


    git clone https://github.com/gregmalcolm/python_koans

    in an appropriate folder.

  2. Launch Visual Studio 2019 and in the start window, select Open at the bottom of the Get started column. Alternately, if you already have Visual Studio running, select the File > Open > Folder command instead.

  3. Navigate to the folder containing your Python code, then choose Select Folder. If you’re using the python_koans code, make sure to select the


    python3

    folder within the clone folder.

  4. Visual Studio displays the folder in Solution Explorer in what’s called Folder View. You can expand and collapse folders using the arrows on the left edges of the folder names:

  5. When opening a Python folder, Visual Studio creates several hidden folders to manage settings related to the project. To see these folders (and any other hidden files and folders, such as the


    .git

    folder), select the Show All Files toolbar button:

  6. To run the code, you first need to identify the startup or primary program file. In the example shown here, select the startup file contemplate-koans.py, right-click that file and select Set as Startup Item.

    Important

    If your startup item is not located in the root of the folder you opened, you must also add a line to the launch configuration JSON file as described in the section, Set a working directory.

  7. Run the code by pressing Ctrl+F5 or selecting Debug > Start without Debugging. You can also select the toolbar button that shows the startup item with a play button, which runs code in the Visual Studio debugger. In all cases, Visual Studio detects that your startup item is a Python file, so it automatically runs the code in the default Python environment. (That environment is shown to the right of the startup item on the toolbar.)

  8. The program’s output appears in a separate command window:

  9. To run the code in a different environment, select that environment from the drop-down control on the toolbar, then launch the startup item again.

  10. To close the folder in Visual Studio, select the File > Close folder menu command.

  1. For this walkthrough, you can use any folder with Python code that you like. To follow along with the example shown here, clone the gregmalcolm/python_koans GitHub repository to your computer using the command


    git clone https://github.com/gregmalcolm/python_koans

    in an appropriate folder.

  2. Launch Visual Studio 2022 and in the start window, select Open at the bottom of the Get started column. Alternately, if you already have Visual Studio running, select the File > Open > Folder command instead.

  3. Navigate to the folder containing your Python code, then choose Select Folder.

  4. Visual Studio displays the folder in Solution Explorer in what’s called Folder View. You can expand and collapse folders using the arrows on the left edges of the folder names:

  5. When opening a Python folder, Visual Studio creates several hidden folders to manage settings related to the project. To see these folders (and any other hidden files and folders, such as the


    .git

    folder), select the Show All Files toolbar button:

  6. To run the code, you first need to identify the startup or primary program file. In the example shown here, the startup file contemplate-koans.py. Right-click that file and select Set as Startup Item.

    Important

    If your startup item is not located in the root of the folder you opened, you must also add a line to the launch configuration JSON file as described in the section, Set a working directory.

  7. Run the code by pressing Ctrl+F5 or selecting Debug > Start without Debugging. You can also select the toolbar button that shows the startup item with a play button, which runs code in the Visual Studio debugger. In all cases, Visual Studio detects that your startup item is a Python file, so it automatically runs the code in the default Python environment. (That environment is shown to the right of the startup item on the toolbar.)

  8. The program’s output appears in a separate command window:

  9. To run the code in a different environment, select that environment from the drop-down control on the toolbar, then launch the startup item again.

  10. To close the folder in Visual Studio, select the File > Close folder menu command.

Python profile template

Profiles let you quickly switch your extensions, settings, and UI layout depending on your current project or task. To help you get started with Python development, you can use the Python profile template, which is a curated profile with useful extensions, settings, and snippets. You can use the profile template as is or use it as a starting point to customize further for you own workflows.

You select a profile template through the Profiles > Create Profile… dropdown:

Once you select a profile template, you can review the settings and extensions, and remove individual items if you don’t want to include them in your new Profile. After creating the new profile based on the template, changes made to settings, extensions, or UI are persisted in your profile.

Microsoft visual Studio 2019 || Python with Visual studio || Visual Studio installation
Microsoft visual Studio 2019 || Python with Visual studio || Visual Studio installation

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Python in Visual Studio Code

Working with Python in Visual Studio Code, using the Microsoft Python extension, is simple, fun, and productive. The extension makes VS Code an excellent Python editor, and works on any operating system with a variety of Python interpreters. It leverages all of VS Code’s power to provide auto complete and IntelliSense, linting, debugging, and unit testing, along with the ability to easily switch between Python environments, including virtual and conda environments.

This article provides only an overview of the different capabilities of the Python extension for VS Code. For a walkthrough of editing, running, and debugging code, use the button below.

Creating a Python Project

We can develop web applications using Python with above one of the frameworks. Open Visual Studio 2019 and select “Create new project”.

Select the language dropdown as “Python”. We can see all the project templates of the project for Python.

We can see the template with a different framework. We can choose and develop any one of the templates a can develop the application based on our requirement.

How to Setup Python on Microsoft Visual Studio 2022 | Amit Thinks
How to Setup Python on Microsoft Visual Studio 2022 | Amit Thinks

Autocomplete and IntelliSense

The Python extension supports code completion and IntelliSense using the currently selected interpreter. IntelliSense is a general term for a number of features, including intelligent code completion (in-context method and variable suggestions) across all your files and for built-in and third-party modules.

IntelliSense quickly shows methods, class members, and documentation as you type. You can also trigger completions at any time with ⌃Space (Windows, Linux Ctrl+Space). Hovering over identifiers will show more information about them.

Open source

Fork us on Github

Python Tools for Visual Studio is a completely free extension, developed and supported by Microsoft with contributions from the community. Visit our Github page to see or participate in PTVS development.

Install Python support in Visual Studio

Python support is available only on Visual Studio for Windows. On Mac and Linux, Python support is available through Visual Studio Code.

Python Winforms Application in Visual Studio 2019 | IronPython Getting Started
Python Winforms Application in Visual Studio 2019 | IronPython Getting Started

Version Control integration

Collaborate on code with Git

Use Git as the default source control experience in Visual Studio right out of the box. From the new Git menu, you can create or clone repositories from GitHub or Azure DevOps. Use the integrated Git tool windows to commit and push changes to your code, manage branches, sync with your remote repositories, and resolve merge conflicts.

Python Frameworks

There are following famous frameworks are available. If we are learning following Python frameworks we have good opportunities.

Django

A Python-based free and open-source web framework. It is the model –template –view(MTV) architectural pattern. It is the main primary goal is to ease the creation of complex website.

Pyramid

Python web application framework. It is designed to make creating web applications easier. It is an open-source. It is designed to easy to use.

TurboGears

This is a Python web application framework. It is designed around the model, view and controller architecture. It is designed to make rapid web application development in Python easier and more maintainable.

Web2py

The open-source web application framework is written in the Python programming language. web2py focuses on rapid development, favors convention over configuration approach and follows a model–view–controller (MVC) architectural pattern.

Flask

Flask is a micro web framework written in Python. It is classified as a microframework because it does not require particular tools or libraries

CherryPy

CherryPy is an object-oriented web application framework using the Python programming language. It is designed for rapid development of web applications

Falcon

A light-weight micro-framework written in Python for building web APIs and app backbends. It is like Falcon. It has a clean design that embraces HTTP and the REST architectural style.

Machine Learning w/ Python in Visual Studio 2019 (Getting Started)
Machine Learning w/ Python in Visual Studio 2019 (Getting Started)

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Tutorial: Work with Python in Visual Studio

In this tutorial, you learn how to work with Python in Visual Studio. Python is a popular programming language that’s reliable, flexible, easy to learn, and free to use on all operating systems. Python is supported by a strong developer community and many free libraries. The language supports all kinds of development, including web applications, web services, desktop apps, scripting, and scientific computing. Many universities, scientists, casual developers, and professional developers use Python. Visual Studio provides first-class language support for Python.

This tutorial guides you through a six-step process:

  • Step 1: Create a Python project (this article)
  • Step 2: Write and run code to see Visual Studio IntelliSense at work
  • Step 3: Create more code in the Interactive REPL window
  • Step 4: Run the completed program in the Visual Studio debugger
  • Step 5: Install packages and manage Python environments
  • Step 6: Work with Git

This article covers the tasks in Step 1. You create a new project and review the UI elements visible in Solution Explorer.

Test your install

Quickly check your installation of Python support:

  1. Launch Visual Studio.

  2. Select Alt + I to open the Python Interactive window.

  3. In the window, enter the statement


    2+2

    .

    The statement output

    displays in the window. If you don’t see the correct output, recheck your steps.

How to run Python in Visual Studio Code on Windows 10/11 [ 2024 Update ] Python Developers
How to run Python in Visual Studio Code on Windows 10/11 [ 2024 Update ] Python Developers

Download and install the Python workload

Complete the following steps to download and install the Python workload.

  1. Download and run the latest Visual Studio Installer for Windows. Python support is present in release 15.2 and later. If you have Visual Studio installed already, open Visual Studio and run the installer by selecting Tools > Get Tools and Features.

    Tip

    The Community edition is for individual developers, classroom learning, academic research, and open source development. For other uses, install Visual Studio Professional or Visual Studio Enterprise.

  2. The installer provides a list of workloads that are groups of related options for specific development areas. For Python, select the Python development workload and select Install:

    Python installation options Description Python distributions Choose any combination of Python distribution that you plan to work with. Common options include 32-bit and 64-bit variants of Python 2, Python 3, Miniconda, Anaconda 2, and Anaconda 3. Each option includes the distribution’s interpreter, runtime, and libraries. Anaconda, specifically, is an open data science platform that includes a wide range of preinstalled packages. Visual Studio automatically detects existing Python installations. For more information, see The Python Environments window. Also, if a newer version of Python is available than the version shown in the installer, you can install the new version separately and Visual Studio detects it. Cookiecutter template support Install the Cookiecutter graphical UI to discover templates, input template options, and create projects and files. For more information, see Use the Cookiecutter extension. Python web support Install tools for web development including HTML, CSS, and JavaScript editing support, along with templates for projects using the Bottle, Flask, and Django frameworks. For more information, see Python web project templates. Python native development tools Install the C++ compiler and other necessary components to develop native extensions for Python. For more information, see Create a C++ extension for Python. Also install the Desktop development with C++ workload for full C++ support.

    By default, the Python workload installs for all users on a computer under:

    %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio\

    \

    Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\Python

    where

    is 2022 and

    is Community, Professional, or Enterprise.

    %ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft Visual Studio\

    \

    Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\Python

    where

    is 2019 or 2017 and

    is Community, Professional, or Enterprise.

Support for multiple interpreters

Visual Studio’s Python Environments window gives you a single place to manage all of your global Python environments, conda environments, and virtual environments. Visual Studio automatically detects installations of Python in standard locations, and allows you to configure custom installations. With each environment, you can easily manage packages, open an interactive window for that environment, and access environment folders.

Use the Open interactive window command to run Python interactively within the context of Visual Studio. Use the Open in PowerShell command to open a separate command window in the folder of the selected environment. In that command window, you can run any python script.

For more information:

Effortless Python with GitHub Copilot
Effortless Python with GitHub Copilot

Installation details of Python

We can see the installation details of the Python on the right-hand side in the installer after selecting the Python development. We can find how much MB of memory have been taken for installing Python.

Click the modify to enable Python in Visual Studio 2019. If you are installing new, we can find the installation button in the bottom instead of the Modify button. Once clicked, the Modify installation will be started.

Features in Visual Studio for Python

  1. Editing is very easy and user-friendly. We can easily edit the Python code with the help of Tooltip, completion and code snippets.
  2. We can install the libraries without trouble. Using search options, find the libraries and install whatever we need for our Python applications.
  3. Debugging is very helpful to find the complex issues. Python in visual studio support debugging without project.
  4. We can use effective source controller Git and TFS. We can use Git and TFS without a command line.
  5. Unit testing is validating your changes in the editor. We can verify the code is working correctly without leaving the visual studio. We can view, edit, and debug the unit test from the test window.
  6. Python tool for Visual Studio is a free extension, develop and support by Microsoft with contribution from the community.

Python Project Template

Open Visual Studio, click the new project and type the Python in the search bar in Visual Studio 2019. We can see all Python-related templates, as shown below.

We have more than five templates available. In the Python application; it is used to create the command line project. Python Web Project, it is used to creating a generic Python web project. Django Web Project, it is one of the frameworks. A project for creating an application using the Django web framework. We have Django, Flask, and Bottle web framework for Python. It features sample pages that use the Twitter Bootstrap framework for responsive web design.

How To Install Python Libraries In Visual Studio Code (Windows 11)
How To Install Python Libraries In Visual Studio Code (Windows 11)

Project system, and project and item templates

Visual Studio helps you manage the complexity of a project as it grows over time. A Visual Studio project is more than a folder structure. A project aids in the understanding of how different files are used and how they relate to each other. Visual Studio helps you distinguish app code, test code, web pages, JavaScript, build scripts, and so on, which then enable file-appropriate features. A Visual Studio solution helps you manage multiple related projects, such as a Python project and a C++ extension project.

Note

In Visual Studio 2019 and later, you can open a folder containing Python code and run that code without creating a Visual Studio project or solution file. For more information, see Quickstart: Open and run Python code in a folder. Keep in mind that there are benefits to using a project file, as explained in this section.

The following image shows an example of a Visual Studio solution containing both Python and Flask projects in Solution Explorer.

Project and item templates automate the process of setting up different types of projects and files. The templates save you valuable time and relieve you from managing intricate and error-prone details. Visual Studio provides templates for web, Azure, data science, console, and other types of projects. You can find templates for files like Python classes, unit tests, Azure web configuration, HTML, and even Django apps.

For more information:

  • Manage Python projects
  • Item templates reference
  • Python project templates
  • Work with C++ and Python
  • Create project and item templates
  • Solutions and projects in Visual Studio

Conclusion

I hope this article helps with ideas on how to set up and choose the template to develop an application using Python in Visual Studio 2019. The next part of this article explains how to develop the first Python with a simple program. This is really helpful for new learners.

Install Python support in Visual Studio

Python support is available only on Visual Studio for Windows. On Mac and Linux, Python support is available through Visual Studio Code.

How To Create & Activate A Virtual Environment In Visual Studio Code (Python 3.12)
How To Create & Activate A Virtual Environment In Visual Studio Code (Python 3.12)

Enhance completions with AI

GitHub Copilot is an AI-powered code completion tool that helps you write code faster and smarter. You can use the GitHub Copilot extension in VS Code to generate code, or to learn from the code it generates.

GitHub Copilot provides suggestions for languages beyond Python and a wide variety of frameworks, including JavaScript, TypeScript, Ruby, Go, C# and C++.

You can learn more about how to get started with Copilot in the Copilot documentation.

Download and install the Python workload

Complete the following steps to download and install the Python workload.

  1. Download and run the latest Visual Studio Installer for Windows. Python support is present in release 15.2 and later. If you have Visual Studio installed already, open Visual Studio and run the installer by selecting Tools > Get Tools and Features.

    Tip

    The Community edition is for individual developers, classroom learning, academic research, and open source development. For other uses, install Visual Studio Professional or Visual Studio Enterprise.

  2. The installer provides a list of workloads that are groups of related options for specific development areas. For Python, select the Python development workload and select Install:

    Python installation options Description Python distributions Choose any combination of Python distribution that you plan to work with. Common options include 32-bit and 64-bit variants of Python 2, Python 3, Miniconda, Anaconda 2, and Anaconda 3. Each option includes the distribution’s interpreter, runtime, and libraries. Anaconda, specifically, is an open data science platform that includes a wide range of preinstalled packages. Visual Studio automatically detects existing Python installations. For more information, see The Python Environments window. Also, if a newer version of Python is available than the version shown in the installer, you can install the new version separately and Visual Studio detects it. Cookiecutter template support Install the Cookiecutter graphical UI to discover templates, input template options, and create projects and files. For more information, see Use the Cookiecutter extension. Python web support Install tools for web development including HTML, CSS, and JavaScript editing support, along with templates for projects using the Bottle, Flask, and Django frameworks. For more information, see Python web project templates. Python native development tools Install the C++ compiler and other necessary components to develop native extensions for Python. For more information, see Create a C++ extension for Python. Also install the Desktop development with C++ workload for full C++ support.

    By default, the Python workload installs for all users on a computer under:

    %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio\

    \

    Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\Python

    where

    is 2022 and

    is Community, Professional, or Enterprise.

    %ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft Visual Studio\

    \

    Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\Python

    where

    is 2019 or 2017 and

    is Community, Professional, or Enterprise.

How to Run Python 3.12 in Visual Studio Code on Windows 10 [2023]| Run Sample Python Program
How to Run Python 3.12 in Visual Studio Code on Windows 10 [2023]| Run Sample Python Program

Test your install

Quickly check your installation of Python support:

  1. Launch Visual Studio.

  2. Select Alt + I to open the Python Interactive window.

  3. In the window, enter the statement


    2+2

    .

    The statement output

    displays in the window. If you don’t see the correct output, recheck your steps.

Download and install the Python workload

Complete the following steps to download and install the Python workload.

  1. Download and run the latest Visual Studio Installer for Windows. Python support is present in release 15.2 and later. If you have Visual Studio installed already, open Visual Studio and run the installer by selecting Tools > Get Tools and Features.

    Tip

    The Community edition is for individual developers, classroom learning, academic research, and open source development. For other uses, install Visual Studio Professional or Visual Studio Enterprise.

  2. The installer provides a list of workloads that are groups of related options for specific development areas. For Python, select the Python development workload and select Install:

    Python installation options Description Python distributions Choose any combination of Python distribution that you plan to work with. Common options include 32-bit and 64-bit variants of Python 2, Python 3, Miniconda, Anaconda 2, and Anaconda 3. Each option includes the distribution’s interpreter, runtime, and libraries. Anaconda, specifically, is an open data science platform that includes a wide range of preinstalled packages. Visual Studio automatically detects existing Python installations. For more information, see The Python Environments window. Also, if a newer version of Python is available than the version shown in the installer, you can install the new version separately and Visual Studio detects it. Cookiecutter template support Install the Cookiecutter graphical UI to discover templates, input template options, and create projects and files. For more information, see Use the Cookiecutter extension. Python web support Install tools for web development including HTML, CSS, and JavaScript editing support, along with templates for projects using the Bottle, Flask, and Django frameworks. For more information, see Python web project templates. Python native development tools Install the C++ compiler and other necessary components to develop native extensions for Python. For more information, see Create a C++ extension for Python. Also install the Desktop development with C++ workload for full C++ support.

    By default, the Python workload installs for all users on a computer under:

    %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio\

    \

    Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\Python

    where

    is 2022 and

    is Community, Professional, or Enterprise.

    %ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft Visual Studio\

    \

    Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\Python

    where

    is 2019 or 2017 and

    is Community, Professional, or Enterprise.

Top 7 Best Extensions In VSCode For Python Programming That I Use For Data Science Projects
Top 7 Best Extensions In VSCode For Python Programming That I Use For Data Science Projects

Full-featured debugging

One of Visual Studio’s strengths is its powerful debugger. For Python in particular, Visual Studio includes Python/C++ mixed-mode debugging, remote debugging on Linux, debugging within the Interactive window, and debugging Python unit tests.

In Visual Studio 2019 and later, you can run and debug code without having a Visual Studio project file. See Quickstart: Open and run Python code in a folder for an example.

For more information:

  • Debug Python
  • Python/C++ mixed-mode debugging
  • Remote debugging on Linux
  • Feature tour of the Visual Studio Debugger

View environments

  1. Select the View > Other Windows > Python Environments menu command. The Python Environments window opens as a peer to Solution Explorer and shows the different environments available to you. The list shows both environments that you installed using the Visual Studio installer and environments you installed separately. That includes global, virtual, and conda environments. The environment in bold is the default environment that’s used for new projects. For more information about working with environments, see How to create and manage Python environments in Visual Studio environments.

    Note

    You can also use the Ctrl+K, Ctrl+` keyboard shortcut to open the Python Environments window from the Solution Explorer window. If the shortcut doesn’t work and you can’t find the Python Environments window in the menu, it’s possible that you haven’t installed the Python workload. See How to install Python support in Visual Studio on Windows for guidance about how to install Python.

    With a Python project open, you can open the Python Environments window from Solution Explorer. Right-click Python Environments and select View All Python Environments.

  2. Now, create a new project with File > New > Project, selecting the Python Application template.

  3. In the code file that appears, paste the following code, which creates a cosine wave like the previous tutorial steps, only this time plotted graphically. You can also use the project you previously created and replace the code.


    from math import radians import numpy as np # installed with matplotlib import matplotlib.pyplot as plt def main(): x = np.arange(0, radians(1800), radians(12)) plt.plot(x, np.cos(x), 'b') plt.show() main()

  4. In the editor window, hover over the


    numpy

    and

    matplotlib

    import statements. You’ll notice that they aren’t resolved. To resolve the import statements, install the packages to the default global environment.

  5. When you look at the editor window, notice that when you hover over the


    numpy

    and

    matplotlib

    import statements that they aren’t resolved. The reason is the packages haven’t been installed to the default global environment.

    For example, select Open interactive window and an Interactive window for that specific environment appears in Visual Studio.

  6. Use the drop-down list below the list of environments to switch to the Packages tab.The Packages tab lists all packages that are currently installed in the environment.

Best Python IDE: Vim, Emacs, PyCharm, or Visual Studio Code? | Guido van Rossum and Lex Fridman
Best Python IDE: Vim, Emacs, PyCharm, or Visual Studio Code? | Guido van Rossum and Lex Fridman

Debugging

No more

For more specific information on debugging in Python, such as configuring your

launch.json

settings and implementing remote debugging, see Debugging. General VS Code debugging information is found in the debugging document.

Additionally, the Django and Flask tutorials provide examples of how to implement debugging in the context of web applications, including debugging Django templates.

Environments

The Python extension automatically detects Python interpreters that are installed in standard locations. It also detects conda environments as well as virtual environments in the workspace folder. See Configuring Python environments.

The current environment is shown on the right side of the VS Code Status Bar:

The Status Bar also indicates if no interpreter is selected:

The selected environment is used for IntelliSense, auto-completions, linting, formatting, and any other language-related feature. It is also activated when you run or debug Python in a terminal, or when you create a new terminal with the Terminal: Create New Terminal command.

To change the current interpreter, which includes switching to conda or virtual environments, select the interpreter name on the Status Bar or use the Python: Select Interpreter command.

VS Code prompts you with a list of detected environments as well as any you’ve added manually to your user settings (see Configuring Python environments).

How to setup Python for VSCode in 2023 in 5mins! | Install Python and Setup VSCode for Windows 10
How to setup Python for VSCode in 2023 in 5mins! | Install Python and Setup VSCode for Windows 10

Jupyter notebooks

To enable Python support for Jupyter notebook files (

.ipynb

) in VS Code, you can install the Jupyter extension. The Python and Jupyter extensions work together to give you a great Notebook experience in VS Code, providing you the ability to directly view and modify code cells with IntelliSense support, as well as run and debug them.

You can also convert and open the notebook as a Python code file through the Jupyter: Export to Python Script command. The notebook’s cells are delimited in the Python file with

#%%

comments, and the Jupyter extension shows Run Cell or Run Below CodeLens. Selecting either CodeLens starts the Jupyter server and runs the cell(s) in the Python interactive window:

You can also connect to a remote Jupyter server to run your notebooks. For more information, see Jupyter support.

Interactive window

For every Python environment known to Visual Studio, you can easily open the same interactive (REPL) environment for a Python interpreter directly within Visual Studio, rather than using a separate command prompt. You can easily switch between environments as well. To open a separate command prompt, select your desired environment in the Python Environments window, then select the Open in PowerShell command as explained earlier in the Support for multiple interpreters section.

Visual Studio also provides tight integration between the Python code editor and the Interactive window. The Ctrl+Enter keyboard shortcut conveniently sends the current line of code (or code block) in the editor to the Interactive window, then moves to the next line (or block). Ctrl+Enter lets you easily step through code without having to run the debugger. You can also send selected code to the Interactive window with the same keystroke, and easily paste code from the Interactive window into the editor. Together, these capabilities allow you to work out details for a segment of code in the Interactive window and easily save the results in a file in the editor.

Visual Studio also supports IPython/Jupyter in the REPL, including inline plots, .NET, and Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF).

For more information:

How To Install OpenCV Python in Visual Studio Code (Windows 10)
How To Install OpenCV Python in Visual Studio Code (Windows 10)

Questions and answers

Q. Is Python support available with Visual Studio for Mac?

A. Visual Studio for Mac isn’t currently supported. For more information, see What’s happening to Visual Studio for Mac? Visual Studio Code on Windows, Mac, and Linux works well with Python through available extensions.

Q. What can I use to build UI with Python?

A. The main offering in this area is the Qt Project with bindings for Python known as PySide (the official binding) (also see PySide downloads) and PyQt. Python support in Visual Studio doesn’t include any specific tools for UI development.

Q. Can a Python project produce a stand-alone executable?

A. Python is generally an interpreted language, where code is run on demand in a suitable Python-capable environment such as Visual Studio and web servers. Visual Studio doesn’t currently provide the means to create a stand-alone executable, which essentially means a program with an embedded Python interpreter. However, the Python community offers different means to create executables as described on StackOverflow. CPython also supports being embedded within a native application, as described on the blog post, Using CPython’s embeddable zip file.

Install Python and the Python extension

The tutorial guides you through installing Python and using the extension. You must install a Python interpreter yourself separately from the extension. For a quick install, use Python from python.org and install the extension from the VS Code Marketplace.

Note: To help get you started with Python development, you can use the Python profile template that includes useful extensions, settings, and Python code snippets.

Once you have a version of Python installed, select it using the Python: Select Interpreter command. If VS Code doesn’t automatically locate the interpreter you’re looking for, refer to Environments – Manually specify an interpreter.

You can configure the Python extension through settings. Learn more in the Python Settings reference.

Windows Subsystem for Linux: If you are on Windows, WSL is a great way to do Python development. You can run Linux distributions on Windows and Python is often already installed. When coupled with the WSL extension, you get full VS Code editing and debugging support while running in the context of WSL. To learn more, go to Developing in WSL or try the Working in WSL tutorial.

How to Run Python in Visual Studio Code on Windows 10 2022 Best IDE
How to Run Python in Visual Studio Code on Windows 10 2022 Best IDE

Python support in Visual Studio on Windows

Python is a popular programming language that’s reliable, flexible, easy to learn, free to use on all operating systems, and supported by both a strong developer community and many free libraries. Python supports all manner of development, including web applications, web services, desktop apps, scripting, and scientific computing. Scientists, casual developers, professional developers, and many universities alike use Python for programming. You can learn more about the language on python.org and Python for Beginners.

Visual Studio is a powerful Python IDE on Windows. Visual Studio provides open-source support for the Python language through the Python Development and Data Science workloads (Visual Studio 2017 and later) and the free Python Tools for Visual Studio extension (Visual Studio 2015 and earlier). Tour the Visual Studio IDE to familiarize yourself with the IDE features for writing and editing Python code.

Visual Studio Code is available on Mac and Linux. For more information, see questions and answers.

To get started:

  • Follow the installation instructions to set up the Python workload.

  • Familiarize yourself with the Python capabilities of Visual Studio through the sections in this article.

  • Go through one or more of the Quickstarts to create a project. If you’re unsure, start with Quickstart: Open and run Python code in a folder or Create a web app with Flask.

  • Follow the Work with Python in Visual Studio tutorial for a full end-to-end experience.

Rich editing, IntelliSense, and code comprehension

Visual Studio provides a first-class Python editor, including syntax coloring, autocomplete across all your code and libraries, code formatting, signature help, refactoring, linting, and type hints. Visual Studio also provides unique features like class view, Go to Definition, Find All References, and code snippets. Direct integration with the Interactive window helps you quickly develop existing Python code in a file.

For more information:

Python 2-dars. Kerakli dasturlar
Python 2-dars. Kerakli dasturlar

Feedback

Submit and view feedback for

Step 5: Install packages in your Python environment

Previous step: Run code in the debugger

The Python developer community has produced thousands of useful packages that you can incorporate into your own projects. Visual Studio provides a UI to manage packages in your Python environments.

Review elements in Solution Explorer

Take some time to familiarize yourself with Solution Explorer, where you can browse files and folders in your project.

  • (1) At the top level is the solution, which by default has the same name as your project. A solution, which is shown as an .sln file on disk, is a container for one or more related projects. For example, if you write a C++ extension for your Python application, that C++ project can be in the same solution. The solution might also contain a project for a web service, and projects for dedicated test programs.

  • (2) Your project is highlighted in bold and uses the name you entered in the Create a new project dialog. On disk, this project is represented by a .pyproj file in your project folder.

  • (3) Under your project you see source files. In this example, you have only a single .py file. Selecting a file displays its properties in the Properties window. If you don’t see the Properties window, select the wrench icon in the Solution Explorer banner. Double-clicking a file opens it in whatever way is appropriate for that file.

  • (4) Also under the project is the Python Environments node. Expand the node to show the available Python interpreters.

  • (5) Expand an interpreter node to see the libraries installed in that environment.

Right-click any node or item in Solution Explorer to show a context menu of applicable commands. For example, Rename lets you change the name of a node or item, including the project and the solution.

Visual Studio 2022 (Python Getting Started)
Visual Studio 2022 (Python Getting Started)

Test your install

Quickly check your installation of Python support:

  1. Launch Visual Studio.

  2. Select Alt + I to open the Python Interactive window.

  3. In the window, enter the statement


    2+2

    .

    The statement output

    displays in the window. If you don’t see the correct output, recheck your steps.

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