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Ms Access Delete Table If Exists | Adding New Tables

How to Create a Delete Query to Delete Records from Tables in Microsoft Access

Enter data by using a list

Lists help maintain data integrity and are easy to use. You can use lists in forms, and in tables and queries. Access has three types of lists — value lists, lookup fields and multivalued lists. Value lists display a set of items that you enter manually. Lookup lists use a query to retrieve their data from one or more table result sets open in datasheet view. Multivalued lists solve a common business requirement, a many-to-many relationship. For example, you might to want to track customer support issues and assign multiple people the same issue in one field.

There are three types of list controls:

Combo box

List box

Multiselect Combo box

Enter an item from a combo box

  1. Open the form in Form View, or the table or query in Datasheet View.

  2. Click the down arrow next to the list, and then select the item you want.

  3. To commit your choice to your database, move the cursor to another field, or press Shift+ Enter.

Enter an item from a list box

  1. Open the form in Form View.

  2. Scroll down the list of items in the list box and select the item you want.

  3. To commit your choice to your database, move the cursor to another field, or press Shift+ Enter.

Enter items from a multivalued list in a Multiselect Combo box

  1. Open the form in Form View, or the table or query in Datasheet View.

  2. Click the down arrow next to the list.

  3. Select up to 100 check boxes, and then click OK.

Edit the items in a list

To edit items in a list, the list must be enabled for editing. For more information, see Design considerations for updating data.

  1. Open the form, table, or query result set that contains the list.

  2. Do one of the following:

    • Right-click the list that you want to edit, and then click Edit List Items.

    • Click the list and then click the button to open the Edit List Items dialog box or form.

  3. The screen that you see depends on the type of list that you want to edit. Do one of the following.

    • If you are editing a value list or multivalued field, use the Edit List Items dialog box to edit the list data, keeping each item on a separate line, and then click OK after you finish.

      To select a default value for new records, click the drop-down arrow in the Default Value box, and then click the value you want.

    • If you are editing a lookup field, a data entry form appears. Use that form to edit the list data.

  4. Click OK.

Find a record

You must first find a record before you can edit or delete it. In a form or datasheet that contains only a small number of records, you can use the record navigation buttons to navigate through the records until you find the one you want. When there are many records, you can use the Find and Replace dialog box and filter for the record.

Use the record navigation buttons

You can navigate between records by using the navigation buttons.

Arrow buttons Click to conveniently navigate to the first, previous, next, or last record.

New (blank) record Click to add a record.

Current Record Type a record number and then press ENTER to navigate to that record. The record number is counted sequentially, from the beginning of the form or datasheet — it does not correspond to any field value.

Filter The filter indicator button shows whether a filter has been applied. Click to remove or reapply the filter.

Search Enter text in the Search box. The first matching value is highlighted in real time as you enter each character.

Use the Find and Replace dialog box

The Find and Replace dialog box provides another way to change small amounts of data in less time and with less effort. You can use the Find feature in the Find and Replace dialog box to locate a matching record. When you find a matching record, that record becomes the current record, and you can then edit or delete it.

  1. Click the field that you want to search.

  2. On the Home tab, in the Find group, click Find, or press CTRL+F.

    The Find and Replace dialog box appears.

  3. Click the Find tab.

  4. In the Find What box, type the value that you want to match.

  5. Optionally, use the Look In list to change the field that you want to search, or to search the entire underlying table instead.

  6. Optionally, in the Match list, select Any Part of Field. Selecting this option provides the broadest possible search.

  7. In the Search list, select All, and then click Find Next.

For more information, see Use the Find and Replace dialog box to change data.

Apply a filter

You can apply a filter to limit the records that are displayed to those that match your criteria. Applying a filter makes it easier to find the record that you want to edit or delete.

  1. Open the table in Datasheet View or form in Form View.

  2. To ensure that the table or form is not already filtered, on the Home tab, in the Sort & Filter group, click Advanced, and then click Clear All Filters, or click Filter in the record navigation bar.

  3. Navigate to the record that contains the value that you want to use as part of the filter, and then click the field. To filter based on a partial selection, select only the characters that you want.

  4. On the Home tab, in the Sort & Filter group, click Selection, or right-click the field and apply a filter.

  5. To filter other fields based on a selection, repeat steps 3 and 4.

For more information, see Apply a filter to view select records in an Access database.

How to Create a Delete Query to Delete Records from Tables in Microsoft Access
How to Create a Delete Query to Delete Records from Tables in Microsoft Access

I use MS Access macros and queries to build my application. I use some temporary import files, and need to either run a macro, or some VBA, to test if they exist, and then if they do, to delete them.

My table name is “TempImport1”

I’ve researched this via Google searches and have some VBA that might work. I have cut/pasted VBA code under a button in the past, and it worked, but not this time. How do I put the code into a module or a click sub button?


Function IsTable(sTblName As String) As Boolean 'does table exists and work ? 'note: finding the name in the TableDefs collection is not enough, ' since the backend might be invalid or missing On Error GoTo TrapError Dim x x = DCount("*", sTblName) IsTable = True Exit Function TrapError: Debug.Print Now, sTblName, Err.Number, Err.Description IsTable = False End Function

“It doesn’t work” is insufficient information. have you stepped through the code so you know that the delete is being executed? Are you getting an error message? Make sure that you don’t have warning messages turned off. And as Doc suggested, if you have relationships, you need to delete tables from the “bottom” up.
In the real world, it is very rare indeed to delete a table on the fly. You might want to explain why you are doing this. We might be able to offer an alternative.
Working with temp tables causes database bloat unless you do it correctly. For example, in apps where I need to import sets of data from other applications where for whatever reason, I can’t link to the remote tables, I keep all the temp tables in a separate template database. I make the template with empty tables, compact it and save it. Then when I need to import new data, I copy the template to the active directory which overlays any existing version. The name of the template didn’t change so my table links are still intact. Then I just run append queries to fill the template.

Delete table if exists in Microsoft Access

Solution 1:

try this code


Class.forName("sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver"); Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:odbc:MsAccessDSN"); Statement stmt = con.createStatement(); // Specify the type of object; in this case we want tables String[] types = {"TABLE"}; ResultSet checkTable = con.getMetaData().getTables(null, null, "%", types); String tableName = null; while (checkTable.next()) { System.out.println("In here"); tableName = checkTable.getString(3) System.out.println(tableName); // check if the table 'data_table' exist in your database if (tableName.equals("data_table"){ try { //drop the table if present int temp = stmt.executeUpdate("DROP TABLE " + tableName); break; } catch (Exception e) { System.err.println("Exception in testDropTable (): \n" + "Drop Table testDropTable threw an exception: " +(e.getMessage())); } } } con.close;

To obtain additional details, please refer to the metadata available here.

Solution 2:

To delete a table from your database, use the “drop table table name” command. Instead of “DB_TABLE,” try using “data_table.


String dropTable = "DROP TABLE "; String[] tables = data_table;

try this


public void testDropTable () throws SQLException{ Class.forName("sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver"); Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:odbc:MsAccessDSN"); Statement stmt = con.createStatement(); ResultSet checkTable = con.getMetaData().getTables(null, null, "POI", null); String tableName = null; while (checkTable.next()) { System.out.println("In here"); tableName = checkTable.getString("data_table"); System.out.println(tableName); } if (tableName != null){ try { String dropTable = "DROP TABLE "; String[] tables = tableName; for (int i = 0; i < tables.length; i++){ String stringCode = new String(); stringCode = stringCode + tables[i]; System.out.println(dropTable + tables[i]); // Drop each table in the array. int temp = stmt.executeUpdate(dropTable + tables[i]); } } catch (Exception e) { System.err.println("Exception in testDropTable (): \n" + "Drop Table testDropTable threw an exception: " +(e.getMessage())); } } else{ con.close(); } }

Solution 3:

If anyone is curious about this matter, I simplified the code by eliminating the while loop statement from the answer that was accepted.


public void testDropTable() throws SQLException, ClassNotFoundException { Class.forName("sun.jdbc.odbc.JdbcOdbcDriver"); Connection con = DriverManager.getConnection("jdbc:odbc:MsAccessDSN"); Statement stmt = con.createStatement(); String[] tables = {"data_table"}; for (String table : tables) { try { stmt.executeUpdate("DROP TABLE " + table); } catch (SQLException e) { System.err.println("Exception in testDropTable (): \n" + "Drop Table testDropTable threw an exception: " +(e.getMessage())); } } con.close(); }

  1. Jul 17th, 2018, 08:24 AM
    #1

    Thread Starter

    Addicted Member

    Feedback

    Submit and view feedback for

    There are several ways to update data in an Access database. You add a record to your database when you have a new item to track, such as a new contact to the Contacts table. When you add a new record, Access appends the record to the end of the table. You also change fields to stay up-to-date, such as a new address or last name. To maintain data integrity, the fields in an Access database are set to accept a specific type of data, such as text or numbers. If you don’t enter the correct data type, Access displays an error message. Finally, you can delete a record when it is no longer relevant and to save space.

    For more information on setting up a database for data entry, see Design considerations for updating data.

    How to Delete Records from a Table in MS Access - Office 365
    How to Delete Records from a Table in MS Access – Office 365

    Example

    The following example assumes the existence of a hypothetical NewIndex index on the Employees table in the Northwind database.

    This example deletes the index MyIndex from the Employees table.


    Sub DropX1() Dim dbs As Database ' Modify this line to include the path to Northwind ' on your computer. Set dbs = OpenDatabase("Northwind.mdb") ' Delete NewIndex from the Employees table. dbs.Execute "DROP INDEX NewIndex ON Employees;" dbs.Close End Sub

    This example deletes the Employees table from the database.


    Sub DropX2() Dim dbs As Database ' Modify this line to include the path to Northwind ' on your computer. Set dbs = OpenDatabase("Northwind.mdb") ' Delete the Employees table. dbs.Execute "DROP TABLE Employees;" dbs.Close End Sub

    Deleting an Access Table: A Step-by-Step Guide

    To delete records solely from tables that begin with a specific prefix, it’s essential to exclude that prefix from the condition. Otherwise, you’ll end up deleting records from all other tables, including system tables, which is not desirable. The command to drop a table from your database is “DROP TABLE table name”.

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    • How I can delete data from table?
    • How to delete all the records in a table?

    VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    DoCmd.RunSQL “DROP TABLE myTable;”

    However, depending on how far into the application the user is, that table may or may not exist. If it doesn’t, the above statement throws the error “Table ‘myTable’ does not exist”.

    I have tried using SQL statements such as IF EXISTS to try to build a query that will first check for the existence of the table, and then delete it or not. But the IF EXISTS statement causes errors in the RunSQL method.

    Does anybody have any suggestions on how to first check if a table exists, and then delete it (or not).

    RE: VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    i.e.

    sub my_sub()

    on error got err_hit

    ‘your code here

    exit sub

    err_hit:

    if err = xxx then

    resume next

    else

    msgbox(“error “&cstr(err)&” encountered”)

    end sub

    RE: VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    An example that works but doesn ‘t care if the table exists or not!

    CODE

    Docmd.DeleteObject acTable, “YourTableName”

    On Error GoTo 0

    RE: VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    CODE

    Dim i as Long

    Set dbase = New Access.Application

    ….

    For i = 0 To dbase.CurrentDb.TableDefs.Count – 1

    If dbase.CurrentDb.TableDefs(i).Name = sTable Then

    dbase.CurrentDb.TableDefs.Delete sTable

    dbase.CurrentDb.TableDefs.Refresh

    Exit For

    End If

    Next i

    RegardsFrederico FonsecaSysSoft Integrated Ltdwww.syssoft-int.com

    RE: VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    Hint – there are seven fora dedicated to Access (check forum search at the top)…

    Roy-Vidar

    RE: VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    Was just about to to type up something similar, maybe more useful as a general function just to check existence of a table.

    CODE

    Dim i As Integer

    i = 0

    pfTableExists = False

    While pfTableExists = False And i < CurrentDb.TableDefs.Count – 1

    pfTableExists = (CurrentDb.TableDefs(i).Name = strTableName)

    i = i + 1

    Wend

    End Function

    “In three words I can sum up everything I’ve learned about life: it goes on.” – Robert Frost 1874-1963

    RE: VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    On Error Resume Next

    DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, “table1”

    On Error Resume Next

    DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, “table2”

    On Error Resume Next

    DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, “table3”

    On Error GoTo 0

    So thank you JerryKlmns for the very simple solution, and thank you all for the input!

    RE: VB/Access — If Table Exists, Delete It

    On Error Resume Next

    DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, “table1”

    DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, “table2”

    DoCmd.DeleteObject acTable, “table3”

    On Error GoTo 0

    Hope This Helps, PH.Want to get great answers to your Tek-Tips questions? Have a look at FAQ219-2884 or FAQ181-2886

    I had a scenario to check existance of a specified table in access. If the specified table is available, it should get deleted(drop) or else just go on performing with the rest of the code. This operation should be done when we close the form. So I used Sub Form_Unload and developed the code.

    Private Sub Form_Unload(Cancel As Integer)Dim tbl As TableDefDim db As DatabaseSet db = CurrentDbFor Each tbl In db.TableDefsIf tbl.Name = “FirstTbl” Thendb.Execute “DROP TABLE FirstTbl”End IfIf tbl.Name = “SecondTbl” Thendb.Execute “DROP TABLE SecondTbl”End IfNext tblEnd Sub

    This is one more method using User defined function

    Dim tbl As TableDef

    Dim db As Database

    Set db = CurrentDb

    For Each tbl In db.TableDefs

    If tbl.Name = “FirstTbl” Then

    db.Execute “DROP TABLE FirstTbl”

    End If

    If tbl.Name = “SecondTbl” Then

    db.Execute “DROP TABLE SecondTbl”

    End If

    Next tbl

    End Sub

    Public Function ifTableExists(tablename As String) As BooleanifTableExists = FalseIf DCount(“[Name]”, “MSysObjects”, “[Name] = ‘” & tablename & “‘”) = 1 ThenifTableExists = TrueElseifTableExists = FalseEnd IfEnd Function

    After creating above UserDefined Function it can be used as

    ifTableExists = False

    If DCount(“[Name]”, “MSysObjects”, “[Name] = ‘” & tablename & “‘”) = 1 Then

    ifTableExists = True

    Else

    ifTableExists = False

    End If

    End Function

    If ifTableExists(“MyTable”) Then db.Execute “DROP Table MyTable”

    DROP statement (Microsoft Access SQL)

    Applies to: Access 2013, Office 2013

    Deletes an existing table, procedure, or view from a database, or deletes an existing index from a table.

    Note

    The Microsoft Access database engine does not support the use of DROP, or any of the DDL statements, with non-Microsoft Access database engine databases. Use the DAO Delete method instead.

    Create an archive in Microsoft Access.  Append and delete queries
    Create an archive in Microsoft Access. Append and delete queries

    How to securely delete a table in MS-Access?

    Solution 1:

    Once the table is deleted from the mdb, all the corresponding data will be lost.

    Backups can pose a challenge, especially if you rely on Windows 7 Backup. Unlike other backup options, removing data selectively may render the backup unsuitable for restoration.

    Firstly, I will eliminate all backup files and clear the data from the Access database. After that, I will conduct a complete system backup afresh. Additionally, I will search for any backup media containing the previous mdb files and erase them.

    If it’s not feasible to remove old backup files, I would opt to secure the backup media physically and encrypt it.

    Presuming that erasing the confidential information doesn’t harm the database or the dependent application, I would suggest keeping a copy of the current database before removal. After that, it’s better to allow the application to run for some time to evaluate the impact of data removal. Once I’m confident that everything is running smoothly, I would delete the one-time backup.

    Solution 2:

    If you truly wish to keep that information from circulating, contemplate.

    • Compacting and repairing the database

    • Re-formatting the partition where the MDB used to reside (or physically shred that physical drive)

    • Shredding the backup tapes

    It’s an intriguing question whether Access saves data in temporary locations on the user’s drive, but I cannot confirm it.

    Solution 3:

    Get rid of any non-confidential information and dispose of the hard drive. All Windows 7 system images should be considered confidential, and any existing copies should be destroyed or treated as such.

    How to Delete Records from a Table in MS Access

    How find if a table in Access 2000 exists and then delete it with code?

    As the title states, how can I check with Jet SQL or somehow with VBA code in Access 2000 if a local Access table exists as context object with a given name?
    And if exists, then I delete it with running query like “DROP TABLE;”

  2. Jul 17th, 2018, 11:16 AM
    #2
    VBA Microsoft Access check if a table exists in the current database
    VBA Microsoft Access check if a table exists in the current database

    Deleting a table

    \n

    So you have a table you didn’t want. Maybe you realize after building Table C that you really only need Tables A and B — or that Table D, which you’ve also created, really makes Table C unnecessary. Whatever the reason, tables, even ones with records in them, are easy to get rid of.

    \n

    Tables are easy to get rid of. Perhaps too easy. Before you delete a table, check and recheck your database to make sure you aren’t deleting information that you need to keep. When a table is deleted,

    all connections to it

    — including all relationships and references in queries and reports — are deleted, too. A prompt appears when you choose to delete a table, reminding you of this.

    \n

    Still committed to ditching the table? Here’s how it’s done:

    \n

      \n

    1. With your database open, look at the panel on the left side of the workspace.

      \n

      You should see a list of your tables in that panel.

      \n

      Each table has its own button, emblazoned with the name you gave the table.

      \n

    2. \n

    3. Right-click the table name in the panel on the left side of the workspace, and choose Delete from the pop-up menu.

      \n

      Choose Delete to get rid of the unwanted table.

      \n

    4. \n

    5. Click Yes in response to the resulting prompt if, in fact, you do want to delete the table.

      \n

      All gone!

      \n

    6. \n

    \n

    Now, you probably think it’s time to start entering records, but no, don’t start that just yet. Before you start populating your tables with data, it’s a better idea to set up your table relationships, establish the key fields that will connect your relational tables, and define the specs for each of your fields — taking advantage of the field options.

    \n

    Even if your database will be a (relatively simple) flat-file database, you need to iron out the settings for your fields before you start entering data — establishing the rules for entering names, numbers, dates, and so on — so that what you enter is graciously accepted by the fields you’ve set up.

    “,”description”:”

    Nobody’s expecting perfection at this stage of the game. Certainly not in your first foray into database creation in Access 2016, and not even on your second or third attempt. Even seasoned experts forget things now and then, realizing after they’ve built a table that they didn’t need it, or after they’ve started setting up reports and queries that they’ve forgotten a table that they needed. It can happen to anyone.

    \n

    What to do? Use Access’s simple interface to add the tables you want and delete the tables you don’t.

    \n

    Re: How find if a table in Access 2000 exists and then delete it with code?

    If you run an SQL statement like this:

    Code:

    SELECT * FROM tableName WHERE 1 = 2

    …it will not return any records (because the Where clause blocks everything), but it also wont give an error if the table exists.
    You should get an error if the table doesn’t exist, so you just need to handle that error appropriately.

  3. Jul 18th, 2018, 07:28 AM
    #3
    The Delete Query in Microsoft Access
    The Delete Query in Microsoft Access

    Edit data in a text box or field

    Access provides one text control for use with Short Text and Long Text (also called Memo) fields. Typically, you can tell if the underlying field is short or long text by the size of the control, which usually reflects the size needed for the underlying table field. A Short Text field can store up to 255 characters and a Long Text field can store 64,000 characters.

    By design, you cannot edit data from some types of queries. For example, you cannot edit the data returned by a crosstab query, and you cannot edit or remove calculated fields — values that a formula calculates as you use your database, but that do not reside in a table.

    1. Open the table or query in Datasheet View or form in Form View.

    2. Click the field or navigate to the field by using the TAB or arrow keys, and then press F2.

      In Form view, you can click a field’s label to select the field. In Datasheet view, you can select a field by clicking near the left border of the field when the mouse pointer becomes a plus (+) sign.

    3. Place the cursor where you want to enter information.

    4. Enter or update the text that you want to insert. If you make a typing mistake, press BACKSPACE.

    5. If a field has an input mask, enter the data according to the format.

    6. To be more productive, learn the following shortcut keys:

      • To insert a new line in a text field, press Ctrl+Enter.

      • To insert the default value for a field, press Ctrl+Alt+Spacebar.

      • To insert the current date in a field, press CTRL+SEMICOLON.

      • To insert the current time, press CTRL+SHIFT+COLON ().

      • To check spelling, press F7.

      • To reuse similar values of a previous record, move to the corresponding field in the previous record, and then press CTRL+’ (apostrophe).

      • To explicitly save your changes, press Shift+Enter.

      For more information, see Keyboard shortcuts for Access.

    7. To save the data, on the Home tab, in the Records group, click Save, or press Shift+Enter.

      You don’t have to explicitly save your changes. Access commits them to the table when you move the cursor to a new field in the same row, when you move the pointer to another row, or when you close the form or datasheet.

    Enter text in a control with input masks

    A field may have an input mask applied. An input mask is a set of literal and placeholder characters that force you to enter data in a specific format. For more information about input masks, see Control data entry formats with input masks.

    • To enter data. follow the input mask:

      The default phone number input mask definition and resulting format

    14. Microsoft Access 2016: Deleting Data With A Delete Query in SQL
    14. Microsoft Access 2016: Deleting Data With A Delete Query in SQL

    Undo changes

    If you type data incorrectly, you can often undo your changes. Do one or more of the following:

    • To undo your last changes, select Undo on the Quick Access Toolbar, or press ESC.

    • To undo all changes to the record, press ESC again.

    • To undo changes after you save changes or move to another record, select Undo on the Quick Access Toolbar.

      Important As soon as you begin editing another record, apply or remove a filter, or switch to another window or document tab, your changes become permanent.

    Add a date by using the Date Picker

    There are several ways to add a date to your table, and using the Date Picker control is a quick option.

    1. Click the field that you want to add a date to. A calendar icon appears.

      Note: The Date Picker control is not available if an input mask is applied to the Date/Time field.

    2. Click the calendar icon. A calendar control appears.

    3. Do one of the following:

      • To enter the current date, click Today.

      • To select a day in the current month, click the date.

      • To select a different month and day, use the forward or back buttons.

    How to Delete the Sample Records From Your Microsoft Access Database Before Release
    How to Delete the Sample Records From Your Microsoft Access Database Before Release

    Delete a record

    The deletion process is fairly simple, except when the record is related to other data and resides on the “one” side of a one-to-many relationship. To maintain data integrity, by default, Access does not let you to delete related data. For more information, see Guide to table relationships.

    1. Open the table in Datasheet View or form in Form View.

    2. Select the record or records that you want to delete.

      To select a record, click the record selector next to the record, if the record selector is available.

      To extend or reduce the selection, drag the record selector (if it is available), or press SHIFT+DOWN ARROW or SHIFT+UP ARROW.

    3. Press DELETE, select Home > Records > Delete, or press Ctrl+Minus Sign (-).

    Tip If you need to delete only some information but not the entire record, select only the data in each field that you want to delete and then press DELETE.

    Syntax

    DROP {TABLE table | INDEX index ON table | PROCEDURE procedure | VIEW view}

    The DROP statement has these parts:

    Part

    Description

    table

    The name of the table to be deleted or the table from which an index is to be deleted.

    procedure

    The name of the procedure to be deleted.

    view

    The name of the view to be deleted.

    index

    The name of the index to be deleted from table.

    Products Quantity remaining calculation in Microsoft Access | Simplified Inventory Database
    Products Quantity remaining calculation in Microsoft Access | Simplified Inventory Database

    Add a record to a table or form

    1. Open the table in Datasheet View or the form in Form View.

    2. On the Home tab, in the Records group, click New, or click New (blank) record, or press Ctrl+Plus Sign (+).

    3. Find the record with an asterisk in the record selector, and enter your new information.

    4. Click or otherwise place the focus on the first field that you want to use, and then enter your data.

    5. To move to the next field in the same row, press TAB, use the Right or Left arrow keys, or click the cell in the next field.

      In a table, to move to the next cell in a column, use the Up or Down arrow keys, or click the cell you want.

    6. When you view another record or close the table or form, Access saves the new record that you added. To explicitly save changes to the current record, press Shift+Enter.

    Insert records into a table

    There are essentially two methods for adding records to a table. The first is to add one record at a time; the second is to add many records at a time. In both cases, you use the SQL statement INSERT INTO to accomplish the task. INSERT INTO statements are commonly referred to as append queries.

    To add one record to a table, you must use the field list to define which fields to put the data in, and then you must supply the data itself in a value list. To define the value list, use the VALUES clause. For example, the following statement will insert the values “1”, “Kelly”, and “Jill” into the CustomerID, Last Name, and First Name fields, respectively.


    INSERT INTO tblCustomers (CustomerID, [Last Name], [First Name]) VALUES (1, 'Kelly', 'Jill')

    You can omit the field list, but only if you supply all the values that record can contain.


    INSERT INTO tblCustomers VALUES (1, Kelly, 'Jill', '555-1040', '[email protected]')

    To add many records to a table at one time, use the INSERT INTO statement along with a SELECT statement. When you are inserting records from another table, each value being inserted must be compatible with the type of field that will be receiving the data.

    The following INSERT INTO statement inserts all the values in the CustomerID, Last Name, and First Name fields from the tblOldCustomers table into the corresponding fields in the tblCustomers table.


    INSERT INTO tblCustomers (CustomerID, [Last Name], [First Name]) SELECT CustomerID, [Last Name], [First Name] FROM tblOldCustomers

    If the tables are defined exactly alike, you can leave out the field lists.


    INSERT INTO tblCustomers SELECT * FROM tblOldCustomers

    Update a Table with values from another Table in MS Access - Office 365
    Update a Table with values from another Table in MS Access – Office 365

    Updating data by using either a form or datasheet

    You use a form to manually update data. Data entry forms can provide an easier, faster, and more accurate way to enter data. Forms can contain any number of controls such as lists, text boxes, and buttons. In turn, each of the controls on the form either reads data from or writes data to an underlying table field.

    Datasheets are grids of data that look like Excel worksheets. You can change data by working directly in Datasheet view. If you are familiar with Excel, datasheets should be relatively easy to understand. You can change data in tables, query result sets, and forms that display datasheets. Typically, you use datasheets when you need to see many records at once.

    Delete all tables in one shot in Ms access

    Solution 1:

    Employ the DELETE action in SQL to eradicate the records without having the need to toggle the Warnings on and off. Simply utilize

    CurrentDb.Execute

    .


    CurrentDb.Execute "DELETE FROM [" & tdf.Name & "]"

    .

    To solely erase entries from tables beginning with

    PB

    , it’s recommended to eliminate

    Not

    from the criteria. If not, you’ll delete information from all other tables, including system tables, which is undesirable.


    Public Sub del_all_records() Dim db As DAO.Database Dim tdf As DAO.TableDef Set db = CurrentDb For Each tdf In db.TableDefs If tdf.Name Like "PB*" Then db.Execute "DELETE FROM [" & tdf.Name & "]" End If Next End Sub

    Solution 2:

    The error in the docmd statement is caused by using an incomplete object name instead of the like operator.

    To delete specific data entries rather than the entire table, a delete statement must be utilized.

    By experimenting with the query design view, one can gain a sense of the functionality of the delete statement/query in Access.

    Solution 3:

    I sourced the code from https://access-excel.tips/access-vba-loop-through-all-tables/ to delete the non-functioning tables.

    To remove all records from numerous tables simultaneously, it’s necessary to generate separate delete queries for each table.

    Subsequently, you could utilize VBA to initiate each query by utilizing the subsequent code to open and execute them.


    Option Compare Database Option Explicit Public Function RunMyqueries() DoCmd.OpenQuery "Query1" DoCmd.OpenQuery "Query2" MsgBox "Done!" End Function

    If you happen to have additional queries, feel free to keep adding them. As for myself, I currently have two queries.

    Additionally, it may be advisable to disable the Alert feature prior to deleting any entries containing

    DoCmd.SetWarnings False

    .

    MS Access - How to split your database and allow multiple users to enter data at the same time
    MS Access – How to split your database and allow multiple users to enter data at the same time

    Deleting Tables from Access in VBA

    Solution 1:

    If you attempted to drop the table, it should be possible. However, you may encounter issues if there are open recordsets on the table, which would result in it becoming locked. To resolve this, check for any connections to the table that have not been closed.

    There is no doubt that there is an issue in your code.

    Solution 2:

    It may be necessary to close the recordset before executing the DROP statement, or setting the RecordSet object to Nothing can also be effective.

    Understanding data entry symbols

    The following table shows some of the record selector symbols you might see when updating data and what they mean.

    Symbol

    Meaning

    This is the current record; the record has been saved as it appears. The current record is indicated by a change in color in the record selector.

    You are editing this record; changes to the record aren’t yet saved.

    This record is locked by another user; you can’t edit it.

    This is a new record in which you can enter information.

    This is the primary key field and contains a value that uniquely identifies the record.

    Access: Working with Tables
    Access: Working with Tables

    Adding new tables

    \n

    If, after you start building your database, you decide that your database warrants more than one table — in other words, if you realize you need a

    relational

    database — then you need to add another table. If you already knew that your database was going to need multiple tables, then — after building the first one — the only thing to do is build the rest, one by one.

    \n

    To add new tables to an existing database, repeat the following steps for each new table:

    \n

      \n

    1. Click the Create tab on the Ribbon.

      \n

      The Create tab’s buttons appear.

      \n

      The Create tab is the logical place to go when you want to create a new table.

      \n

    2. \n

    3. Click the Table button on the Ribbon.

      \n

      A new table, blank and awaiting the name for the first field, appears.

      \n

      Looks familiar, doesn’t it? A new table awaits fields and field names, not to mention records.

      \n

    4. \n

    5. Build and name the fields for this new table.

      \n

      Save your database periodically as you work.

      \n

    6. \n

    7. Continue adding tables, using Steps 1 through 3 for as many tables as you need in the database.

      \n

      You don’t have to do this perfectly from the start — you can always go back to rename fields and add or remove tables (more on how to do that in a second). The goal here is to just

      do it

      — just get started and get the database going so you can see what you have and start working with it.

      \n

    8. \n

    \n

    Naming tables is important — because you’re going to need to know, at a glance at that left-hand panel, what’s in Table1 or Table2 or Table3, right? Better to name them Customers, Orders, Products, and so on, so you don’t have to remember each one by a generic number. To name a table, you can do so when you first close it and are prompted to save it.

    \n

    The Save As dialog box gives you a Table Name box. Type the name and press Enter. If you decide you don’t like the name later on, simply right-click the name it currently has, as displayed in the left-hand panel, and the current name is highlighted. Type the new name, and press Enter to confirm it.

    \n

    You can also choose Rename from the menu that appears if you right-click the table’s name in the left-hand panel that lists your database components. This also gives you the opportunity to type a replacement name.

    \n

    When you close the table, you will be prompted to save the table.

    \n

    Adding new tables

    \n

    If, after you start building your database, you decide that your database warrants more than one table — in other words, if you realize you need a

    relational

    database — then you need to add another table. If you already knew that your database was going to need multiple tables, then — after building the first one — the only thing to do is build the rest, one by one.

    \n

    To add new tables to an existing database, repeat the following steps for each new table:

    \n

      \n

    1. Click the Create tab on the Ribbon.

      \n

      The Create tab’s buttons appear.

      \n

      The Create tab is the logical place to go when you want to create a new table.

      \n

    2. \n

    3. Click the Table button on the Ribbon.

      \n

      A new table, blank and awaiting the name for the first field, appears.

      \n

      Looks familiar, doesn’t it? A new table awaits fields and field names, not to mention records.

      \n

    4. \n

    5. Build and name the fields for this new table.

      \n

      Save your database periodically as you work.

      \n

    6. \n

    7. Continue adding tables, using Steps 1 through 3 for as many tables as you need in the database.

      \n

      You don’t have to do this perfectly from the start — you can always go back to rename fields and add or remove tables (more on how to do that in a second). The goal here is to just

      do it

      — just get started and get the database going so you can see what you have and start working with it.

      \n

    8. \n

    \n

    Naming tables is important — because you’re going to need to know, at a glance at that left-hand panel, what’s in Table1 or Table2 or Table3, right? Better to name them Customers, Orders, Products, and so on, so you don’t have to remember each one by a generic number. To name a table, you can do so when you first close it and are prompted to save it.

    \n

    The Save As dialog box gives you a Table Name box. Type the name and press Enter. If you decide you don’t like the name later on, simply right-click the name it currently has, as displayed in the left-hand panel, and the current name is highlighted. Type the new name, and press Enter to confirm it.

    \n

    You can also choose Rename from the menu that appears if you right-click the table’s name in the left-hand panel that lists your database components. This also gives you the opportunity to type a replacement name.

    \n

    When you close the table, you will be prompted to save the table.

    \n

    MS Access 2007:-Add, Modify and Delete the MS Access Table Database Records in Hindi
    MS Access 2007:-Add, Modify and Delete the MS Access Table Database Records in Hindi

    Deleting a table

    \n

    So you have a table you didn’t want. Maybe you realize after building Table C that you really only need Tables A and B — or that Table D, which you’ve also created, really makes Table C unnecessary. Whatever the reason, tables, even ones with records in them, are easy to get rid of.

    \n

    Tables are easy to get rid of. Perhaps too easy. Before you delete a table, check and recheck your database to make sure you aren’t deleting information that you need to keep. When a table is deleted,

    all connections to it

    — including all relationships and references in queries and reports — are deleted, too. A prompt appears when you choose to delete a table, reminding you of this.

    \n

    Still committed to ditching the table? Here’s how it’s done:

    \n

      \n

    1. With your database open, look at the panel on the left side of the workspace.

      \n

      You should see a list of your tables in that panel.

      \n

      Each table has its own button, emblazoned with the name you gave the table.

      \n

    2. \n

    3. Right-click the table name in the panel on the left side of the workspace, and choose Delete from the pop-up menu.

      \n

      Choose Delete to get rid of the unwanted table.

      \n

    4. \n

    5. Click Yes in response to the resulting prompt if, in fact, you do want to delete the table.

      \n

      All gone!

      \n

    6. \n

    \n

    Now, you probably think it’s time to start entering records, but no, don’t start that just yet. Before you start populating your tables with data, it’s a better idea to set up your table relationships, establish the key fields that will connect your relational tables, and define the specs for each of your fields — taking advantage of the field options.

    \n

    Even if your database will be a (relatively simple) flat-file database, you need to iron out the settings for your fields before you start entering data — establishing the rules for entering names, numbers, dates, and so on — so that what you enter is graciously accepted by the fields you’ve set up.

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    is a professional technology trainer and author. She has written books on Excel, Photoshop, and Dreamweaver.


    Ken Cook

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    Insert, update, and delete records from a table using Access SQL

    Re: How find if a table in Access 2000 exists and then delete it with code?

    Inside Access – DAO : TableDefs

    Code:

    On Error Resume Next
    CurrentDB.TableDefs(“namehere”).delete
    On Erro Goto 0

    Something like that (untested and from what I remember)
    Not sure you’d want to delete it though, no way to retrieve if you are wrong…
    Also TableDefs should work for linked table too, without deleting data, just the link to it.

    Feeling like a fly on the inside of a closed window (Thunk!)
    If I post a lot, it is because I am bored at work! ;D Or stuck…
    * Anything I post can be only my opinion. Advice etc is up to you to persue…
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First, I must admit, that I am not trained in coding with VBA. I use MS Access macros and queries to build my application. I use some temporary import files, and need to either run a macro, or some VBA, to test if they exist, and then if they do, to delete them.

My table name is “TempImport1”

I’ve researched this via google searches and have come across some VBA that might work, but I am lost trying to figure out how to put the code into a module or a click sub button. I have cut/pasted VBA code under a button function in the past, and it worked, but I can’t figure out why it’s not working this time.

Honestly, I’m sure it’s my lack of understanding of private vs public functions, as well as of course, the fact that I don’t know VBA. Thank you for any advice you can provide.

Here’s the code I’m trying to make work:

Expand|Select|Wrap|Line Numbers

  1. Function IsTable(sTblName As String) As Boolean
  2. ‘does table exists and work ?
  3. ‘note: finding the name in the TableDefs collection is not enough,
  4. ‘ since the backend might be invalid or missing
  5. On Error GoTo TrapError
  6. Dim x
  7. x = DCount(“*”, sTblName)
  8. IsTable = True
  9. Exit Function
  10. TrapError:
  11. Debug.Print Now, sTblName, Err.Number, Err.Description
  12. IsTable = False
  13. End Function
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Nobody’s expecting perfection at this stage of the game. Certainly not in your first foray into database creation in Access 2016, and not even on your second or third attempt. Even seasoned experts forget things now and then, realizing after they’ve built a table that they didn’t need it, or after they’ve started setting up reports and queries that they’ve forgotten a table that they needed. It can happen to anyone.

\n

What to do? Use Access’s simple interface to add the tables you want and delete the tables you don’t.

\n

Tutorial for Beginners - MS Access - Insert Update Delete and Fill Listbox in Forms Using VBA
Tutorial for Beginners – MS Access – Insert Update Delete and Fill Listbox in Forms Using VBA

Enter zero-length strings

Access allows you to distinguish between two kinds of blank values: Null values and zero-length strings. Null values indicate an unknown value, and zero-length strings indicate fields that contain a space. For example, suppose you have table of customer data, and that table contains a fax number field. You can leave the field blank if you are unsure of a customer’s fax number. In that case, leaving the field blank enters a null value, which means you don’t know what the value is. If you later determine that the customer doesn’t have a fax machine, you can enter a zero-length string in the field to indicate that you know there is no value.

  1. Open a table or query in Datasheet View or a form in Form View.

  2. Select the field you want, and then type two double quotation marks with no space between them (“”).

  3. Move the cursor to another record to commit your changes to the database or press Shift+Enter. By default, the quotation marks disappear.

Apply rich text formatting to data in a Long Text field

If a Long Text field (also called Memo field) supports rich-text formatting, you can apply different fonts, sizes, styles, and colors to your text.

  1. Open the form in Form View, or the table in Datasheet View.

  2. Select the Long Text field. Typically, you can look for a field named “Comments,” Notes,” or “Description.”

  3. On the Home tab, in the Text Formatting group, use the buttons and menus to format the text.

    You can apply different fonts and sizes, make text bold or italic, change colors, and so on.If you want more space in which to edit, open the Zoom Box.

Removing Duplicate Records - Microsoft Access [ontrackTV video]
Removing Duplicate Records – Microsoft Access [ontrackTV video]

Delete records from a table

To delete the data that is currently in a table, you use the DELETE statement, which is commonly referred to as a delete query. This is also known as truncating a table. The DELETE statement can remove one or more records from a table and generally takes this form:


DELETE FROM table list

The DELETE statement does not remove the table structure—only the data that is currently being held by the table structure. To remove all the records from a table, use the DELETE statement and specify which table or tables from which you want to delete all the records.


DELETE FROM tblInvoices

In most cases, you’ll want to qualify the DELETE statement with a WHERE clause to limit the number of records to be removed.


DELETE FROM tblInvoices WHERE InvoiceID = 3

If you want to remove data only from certain fields in a table, use the UPDATE statement and set those fields equal to NULL, but only if they are nullable fields.


UPDATE tblCustomers SET Email = Null

Support and feedback

Have questions or feedback about Office VBA or this documentation? Please see Office VBA support and feedback for guidance about the ways you can receive support and provide feedback.

Update records in a table

To modify the data that is currently in a table, you use the UPDATE statement, which is commonly referred to as an update query. The UPDATE statement can modify one or more records and generally takes this form.


UPDATE table name SET field name = some value

To update all the records in a table, specify the table name, and then use the SET clause to specify the field or fields to be changed.


UPDATE tblCustomers SET Phone = 'None'

In most cases, you’ll want to qualify the UPDATE statement with a WHERE clause to limit the number of records changed.


UPDATE tblCustomers SET Email = 'None' WHERE [Last Name] = 'Smith'

Importing Data from Excel to Microsoft Access
Importing Data from Excel to Microsoft Access

Re: How find if a table in Access 2000 exists and then delete it with code?

You should get an error if the table doesn’t exist, so you just need to handle that error appropriately.

in that case you could just delete the table and handle any error without testing for existance
you should be able to use an ADOX catalog to return all the table names within a database

Code:

Set xcat = CreateObject(“adox.catalog”)
Set xcat.ActiveConnection = cn
For i = 0 To xcat.tables.Count – 1
‘check if the table is a user defined table
If xcat.tables.Item(i).Type = “TABLE” Then
Debug.Print xcat.tables(i).Name
End If
Next i

Last edited by westconn1; Jul 18th, 2018 at 07:33 AM.

i do my best to test code works before i post it, but sometimes am unable to do so for some reason, and usually say so if this is the case.

Note

code snippets posted are just that and do not include error handling that is required in real world applications, but avoid

On Error Resume Next
dim all variables

as required as often i have done so elsewhere in my code but only posted the relevant part

come back and mark your original post as resolved if your problem is fixed

pete

  • Jul 18th, 2018, 08:20 AM
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