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Install Spring Boot Eclipse | Running Multiple Instances Of The Same Local App

How to Install Spring Boot in Eclipse | Spring Tool Suite| Updated 2022

Installing Eclipse

It’s also worth to mention that installing Spring Tool Suite (STS) instead of pure eclipse, is highly valid. STS is basically eclipse configured with spring tools plugin, optimized for spring framework development

Use the following sections based in which operational system you’ll be using:

Windows

In Windows we have 2 options:

  • Direct download

    Go to eclipse download page, select the latest version (on the writing date of this guide is the 4.10 and install it using NNF (next, next and finish).

  • Using a package manager (Chocolatey)

    If you don’t know Chocolatey, take a look at this post.

    Open powershell and install eclipse using the following command line:

    choco install eclipse

Linux

In Linux we also have 2 options:

  • Direct download

    Go to eclipse download page, select the latest version (on the writing date of this guide is the 4.10, extract the .tar.gz file and execute the eclipse file.

  • Using a package manager

    Depending in which Linux distro you are using, you’ll use a different package manager. For instance, debian based distros, like the popular ubuntu, use apt-get. For Red Hat (or RHEL) based distros use yum or dnf. Search the best way to install eclipse using your package manager.

macOS

In macOS we have 2 options again:

  • Direct download

    Go to eclipse download page, select the latest version (on the writing date of this guide is the 4.10 and install it as usual, dragging the app from the .dmg file to the apps folder of your mac.

  • Using a package manager (Homebrew)

    If you don’t know Homebrew, take a look at this post

    Open your favorite terminal and install eclipse using the following command line:

    brew cask install eclipse-ide

Configuring eclipse

With eclipse installed, I suggest you to open it and start getting used with the GUI and also the shortcut keys.

If you installed Spring Tool Suite, it’s not necessary to follow the installation of Spring Tools below

Spring Tools

In order to have a better development experience with Spring, I recommend you to install the eclipse plugin:

Spring Tools

. Go to menu

Help > Eclipse Marketplace…

and search for spring:

Installing Spring Tools

Install the latest version of Spring Tools (on the writing date of this guide it is the 4.2.1) and restart eclipse.

Spring Tools 4: The new generation on the horizon

In the final section of this article, I want to give you a brief outlook at what is coming next. In December 2017 we launched the public beta of the next generation of Spring tooling. The so-called “Spring Tools 4” initiative and the corresponding public beta launch not just offers great tooling for Spring apps when working with the Eclipse IDE, but is also available for Visual Studio Code and Atom: https://spring.io/tools4.

The next generation includes all of what you have seen here in this article so far, and goes beyond that. It offers a super quick and easy source-code navigation to all the important pieces of your Spring Boot application. You will get easy access to all your request mappings, bean definitions, function implementations, data repositories, and more – just by selecting the “Go To Symbol” action.

In addition to that, your source code will be augmented with information from running Spring Boot applications. As soon as you start your Spring Boot app, real-time information from that app will appear in your source code, allowing you to get a unique insight into your running Spring Boot app. You will be able to see which beans are active, how they got wired to each other, which conditions have succeeded or failed and for what reason, and more.

Wanna give it a try? Feel free to take a look at: https://spring.io/tools4 – download and go! It is available as a ready-to-use Eclipse distribution (based on Eclipse Photon), and as extensions for Visual Studio Code, and Atom.

And feedback is always welcome. Please feel free to go to https://github.com/spring-projects/sts4/issues and raise questions, provide feedback, and report bugs and enhancement requests.

About the Author

This article was co-authored by wikiHow staff writer, Travis Boylls. Travis Boylls is a Technology Writer and Editor for wikiHow. Travis has experience writing technology-related articles, providing software customer service, and in graphic design. He specializes in Windows, macOS, Android, iOS, and Linux platforms. He studied graphic design at Pikes Peak Community College.
This article has been viewed 42,511 times.Learn more…

Java Spring Framework is an open-source framework that is used for creating enterprise-grade, stand-alone applications that run on the Java Virtual Machine. As useful as it is, Java Spring Framework takes a lot of time and knowledge to set up, and deploy. Spring Boot makes this process easier using autoconfiguration, and an opinionated approach that allows Spring Boot to decide which dependencies and packages are right for your project. Spring Boot helps developers that run on their own without relying on an external web server.[1] X Research source On Eclipse, Spring Boot is referred to as Spring Tools Suite. This wikiHow article teaches you how to install Spring Tools Suite.

How to Install Spring Boot in Eclipse | Spring Tool Suite| Updated 2022
How to Install Spring Boot in Eclipse | Spring Tool Suite| Updated 2022

Eclipse Plugin Tools

  • Install C/C++ Development Tooling for Eclipse
  • Install Ruby Development Tools for Eclipse
  • Install Subversive Plugin for Eclipse
  • Install Maven for Eclipse
  • Install Tycho for Eclipse
  • Install Web Tools Platform for Eclipse
  • Install Spring Tool Suite for Eclipse
  • Install JBoss Tools for Eclipse
  • Install AspectJ development tools for Eclipse
  • Install BIRT Report Tools for Eclipse
  • Install Jaspersoft studio for Eclipse – Visual design tool for JasperReports
  • Install WindowBuilder for Eclipse
  • Install RAP e4 Tooling for Eclipse
  • Install e4 Tools Developer Resources for Eclipse
  • Install RAP Tools for Eclipse
  • Install EMF for Eclipse
  • Install GEF for Eclipse

Show More

Creating Spring Boot projects from scratch

The most famous way to create new Spring Boot projects is to go to https://start.spring.io and choose which Spring starter modules you wanna use. Once you do that, you can download a ZIP file of your new project and import that into your development environment.

The Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE come with a direct integration of that into your Eclipse IDE. Go to “File”, select “New” and choose the “Spring → Spring Starter Project”. The wizard lets you choose the Spring Initializr endpoint you would like to use (in case you have a custom one running within your company, for example) and then lets you select a boot version and offers all the Spring Boot starter modules that are around for that boot version. Just choose the ones that match your interest and click “Finish”. You end up with a ready-to-use Spring Boot project in your workspace – in just a few seconds.

How to install Spring Tool Suite STS on Windows 10/11 [ 2023 Update ] Spring Boot Framework
How to install Spring Tool Suite STS on Windows 10/11 [ 2023 Update ] Spring Boot Framework

Installation

You can install the Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE into an existing Eclipse installation using the Eclipse Marketplace. Just open the marketplace client in Eclipse, search for Spring Tools and install the “Spring Tools (aka Spring IDE and Spring Tool Suite)” entry.

In case you prefer to use a ready-to-use distribution, you can go to https://spring.io/tools and download the Spring Tool Suite distribution, which is a full Eclipse distribution (based on the latest Eclipse release) with Spring Tools pre-installed.

Using Spring Guides

In case you want to learn about a specific area of Spring and Spring Boot, you might want to take a look at the Spring Guides: https://spring.io/guides. They offer a comprehensive set of small tutorial-like step-by-step introductions to specific features of Spring. You can use them, for example, to learn how to implement your first RESTful service that delivers JSON.

Those guides can be imported into your Spring-Tools-enhanced Eclipse IDE by using the “Import Spring Getting Started Content” wizard, also available from the “New” menu. It is a great way to quickly import those guide projects, try them out, and learn from them.

Huóng dẫn cài đặt và cấu hình Spring Boot với Eclipse IDE
Huóng dẫn cài đặt và cấu hình Spring Boot với Eclipse IDE

Spring Boot Tutorials

  • Fetch data with Spring Data JPA DTO Projections
  • Install Spring Tool Suite for Eclipse
  • Spring Tutorial for Beginners
  • Spring Boot Tutorial for Beginners
  • Spring Boot Common Properties
  • Spring Boot and Thymeleaf Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot and FreeMarker Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot and Groovy Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot and Mustache Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot and JSP Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot, Apache Tiles, JSP Tutorial with Examples
  • Use Logging in Spring Boot
  • Application Monitoring with Spring Boot Actuator
  • Create a Multi Language web application with Spring Boot
  • Use multiple ViewResolvers in Spring Boot
  • Use Twitter Bootstrap in Spring Boot
  • Spring Boot Interceptors Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot, Spring JDBC and Spring Transaction Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring JDBC Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot, JPA and Spring Transaction Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot and Spring Data JPA Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring Boot, Hibernate and Spring Transaction Tutorial with Examples
  • Integrating Spring Boot, JPA and H2 Database
  • Spring Boot and MongoDB Tutorial with Examples
  • Use Multiple DataSources with Spring Boot and JPA
  • Use Multiple DataSources with Spring Boot and RoutingDataSource
  • Create a Login Application with Spring Boot, Spring Security, Spring JDBC
  • Create a Login Application with Spring Boot, Spring Security, JPA
  • Create a User Registration Application with Spring Boot, Spring Form Validation
  • Example of OAuth2 Social Login in Spring Boot
  • Run background scheduled tasks in Spring
  • CRUD Restful Web Service Example with Spring Boot
  • Spring Boot Restful Client with RestTemplate Example
  • CRUD Example with Spring Boot, REST and AngularJS
  • Secure Spring Boot RESTful Service using Basic Authentication
  • Secure Spring Boot RESTful Service using Auth0 JWT
  • Spring Boot File Upload Example
  • Spring Boot File Download Example
  • Spring Boot File Upload with jQuery Ajax Example
  • Spring Boot File Upload with AngularJS Example
  • Create a Shopping Cart Web Application with Spring Boot, Hibernate
  • Spring Email Tutorial with Examples
  • Create a simple Chat application with Spring Boot and Websocket
  • Deploy Spring Boot Application on Tomcat Server
  • Deploy Spring Boot Application on Oracle WebLogic Server
  • Install a free Let’s Encrypt SSL certificate for Spring Boot
  • Configure Spring Boot to redirect HTTP to HTTPS

Show More

Deploying to Cloud Foundry

Last, but not least, the Spring Boot Dashboard provides a direct integration with Cloud Foundry runtimes. In the same way as your local boot apps, a Cloud Foundry section in your dashboard will list the deployed and running apps, allows you to start and stop them. It also offers you to deploy your project via drag&drop to the Cloud Foundry instance and even debug a running app on Cloud Foundry.

Spring Boot on Eclipse | How to install Spring Tools Plugin [STS] in Eclipse | Spring Boot Tutorial
Spring Boot on Eclipse | How to install Spring Tools Plugin [STS] in Eclipse | Spring Boot Tutorial

Series Spring Core:

  1. Spring Core – Phần 1: Spring IoC , Inversion of Control trong Spring
  2. Spring Core – Phần 2: Spring Bean, Các scope trong Spring, Spring Bean Scope
  3. Spring Core – Phần 3: Spring Dependency Injection, DI trong Spring, so sánh CI – SI
  4. Spring Core – Phần 4: Spring Dependency Injection với Object, Collections, Map
  5. Spring Core – Phần 5: Spring AOP là gì? code ví dụ với Spring AOP
  6. Spring Core – Phần 6: AspectJ là gì? Spring AOP + AspectJ ví dụ với AspectJ
  7. Spring Core: Phần 7 – Spring PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer, lấy dữ liệu từ file properties
  8. Spring Core – Phần 8: Autowiring trong Spring, annotation @Autowired trong Spring, các kiểu autowiring
  9. Spring Core – Phần 9: Spring Auto Component Scanning, Các annotation hay dùng trong Spring
  10. Code ví dụ Spring đọc file từ resource folder (resources)
  11. Code ví dụ gửi email – gmail với Spring

Creating the project

With everything correctly configured, it’s time to create our project. Go to menu:

File > New > Project…

and select the option

Spring starter Project

which is located below

Spring Boot

menu, as the following image:

Starting the project

For this example, I’ll be using Maven as build-tool.

Fill the fields with the name of your artifact and groupId, and select the Type field as Maven:

Starting the project using Maven

After clicking next, we’ll have to especify which version of Spring we will be using. Select the latest stable version (on the writing date of this guide it’s the 2.1.4). As dependency, only select the Web and click Finish.

Select Spring version and dependencies

Project created, now it’s time to create a Controller with a endpoint that will return a fixed String with the value: “Hello-World”. Right click the main package and select

New > Class

:

Creating a class

And create a class named “ExampleController” and fill the suffix of the package with “.controllers”, so a package named controllers will be created and nest your class, and it will group other controllers:

Creating ExampleController

Use the code below to create the endpoint that will return “Hello-World!”:


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22package br.com.danielpadua.java_spring_eclipse_example.controllers; import org.springframework.http.ResponseEntity; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController; /** * ExampleController * * @author danielpadua * */ @RestController @RequestMapping("/api/example") public class ExampleController { @GetMapping("/hello-world") public ResponseEntity

get() { return ResponseEntity.ok("Hello World!"); } }

Run the project by clicking the button Boot Dashboard and then the tab Boot Dashboard at the bottom of the screen. Select the name of your project and click the run button:

Running the project

After clicking run button, you will see the output log of spring initialisation in console tab:

Spring initialization log

To test the project, you only have to open your favorite browser and access: http://localhost:8080/api/example/hello-world and you should be seeing the Hello World message:

Voilà

Install Spring Tools 4 into an Existing Eclipse IDE
Install Spring Tools 4 into an Existing Eclipse IDE

Deploying to Cloudfoundry

Up to here, we talked about existing apps on Cloud Foundry. But how do you get your apps deployed to Cloud Foundry? There are various ways, for example using the `cf“ CLI or the Concourse Cloudfoundry Resource. The boot dashboard offers you another option: you can drag&drop your Spring Boot application directly onto the Cloud Foundry target in the dashboard and it will deploy the Spring Boot app to CF. This is as easy as its sounds.

After dropping the app on the the CF target, a dialog opens that allows you fill in some details about how you want the app to be deployed.

Most of the properties for the deployment are specified using the standard
Cloudfoundry Manifest format that is also used by the

cf push

CLI.

The dialog lets you choose between two modes ‘manual’ and ‘file’. With the manual option you are performing a one-time deployment. The properties are entered into the dialog but not saved anywhere after deployment is performed. With the ‘file’ option you can pick an existing deployment manifest from your workspace and the deployment parameters will be read from that file. In both cases you can edit the parameters in the dialog prior to pressing the OK button to proceed with the deployment.

At the bottom of the dialog is a option to ‘Enable JMX Ssh Tunnel’. This tells STS to Activate JMX support in the app and, after the app is deployed successfully, create an ssh tunnel that makes this accessible locally over an SSH tunnel. This feature and its uses are discussed in more detail in this section.

Once the app is deployed, the boot dashboard will keep the association between the project in your workspace and the deployed app on Cloud Foundry (and will show this association in the boot dashboard).

Keeping the association between your workspace project and the app on Cloud Foundry makes changes to this app a lot easier. If you change the code in your workspace and press the (re)start button for the app on CF, the boot dashboard will automatically re-push the app (the changes) to Cloud Foundry.

Additionally, for an app deployed via the ‘file’ option, the contetns of deployment manifest in the file will be compared against the current state of the cloudfoundry deployment to check for discrepancies. This could happen, if either the contents of the file, or the state of the deployment has changed since the last time the app was deployed. If any discrepancies are found, you will be alerted of this via a dialog that highlights the differences. You are given the choice to either abort the deployment; or manually reconcile the differences before proceeding with the deployment.

Running Spring Boot apps

Suppose we have a simple Spring Boot application that we got from importing the “Rest Service” guide. It implements a simple @RestController and serves some JSON back to the user. In order to run this app, you could select “Run As → Spring Boot App” or create your own launch configuration in the Eclipse IDE. A better and easier way to run your Spring app is the Spring Boot Dashboard. It is a separate view in your IDE that you can activate from the toolbar (look for the Spring Boot icon).

The Spring Boot Dashboard lists all the projects from your workspace that are Spring Boot projects. You can select one or multiple projects and run them just by hitting the “(Re)Start” button. It will create a default launch config for your Spring Boot app automatically if you don’t have one yet.

The Spring Boot Dashboard helps you to deal with potentially many Spring Boot apps in your workspace. It allows you to filter them, start or even restart multiple apps in parallel, or easily jump to the right console view for a running app.

The Spring Boot Dashboard, in addition to managing the launching of apps, offers more facilities for gaining insights into your applications. Jumping to the properties view from a running and selected Spring Boot app in the dashboard, you will see not just a quick overview and a ready-to-use hyperlink that lets you jump to the frontend of the running app immediately (without looking up port numbers, etc.). You will also see two additional tabs that provide direct information from the running app: request mappings and beans. The request mappings tab, for example, shows you all the request mappings that the application serves together with its location in the source code. Double-clicks let you jump directly to the source code where the mapping is implemented. This allows you to easily navigate between your running app and your source code.

The beans tab offers you the list of beans that are live at runtime, created by the Spring application. You can browse through the list or filter for certain characters. The good thing here is that you can also see dependencies among those beans, so that you can gain insight into which bean depends on which other bean. You want to know, for example, which data source got injected into your controller? Search for your controller name in the list of live beans and you will see the answer right away.

Eclipse IDE : How to add Spring Tool Suite (STS) plugin to Eclipse?
Eclipse IDE : How to add Spring Tool Suite (STS) plugin to Eclipse?

Steps

Using the Eclipse Marketplace

  1. Launch Eclipse. Eclipse has an icon that resembles a blue circle with white horizontal lines and a yellow crescent moon to the left. Click the icon on your desktop, Windows Start menu, Applications folder (Mac), or Apps menu (Linux) to open Eclipse.

    • The first time you open Eclipse, you will need to select a folder to use as your workspace. Click Launch in the lower-right corner to use the default workspace folder. Click Browse to select a different location.
  2. Open or create a new project. By default, Eclipse will open the last project you were working on. To create a new project, click File in the menu bar at the top, and then click New. To open an existing project, click File in the menu bar, and then click Open. Select a file and click Open.

    • The first time you open Eclipse, a screen will appear giving you a variety of options. Click the option to open a new Java project to start a new project. Alternatively, you can click the option to open an existing project to begin work on an existing project.

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  3. Click Help. It’s the last option in the menu bar at the top of the screen. This displays the Help menu.
  4. Click Eclipse Marketplace. It’s near the bottom of the Help menu. This opens the Eclipse Marketplace in a new window.
  5. Type Spring Boot in the search box and press ↵ Enter. This displays a list of search results related to Spring Boot. On Eclipse, Spring Boot is called Spring Tools Suite.
  6. Click Install below the latest version of Spring Tools. The latest version of Spring Tools should appear at the top of the list. Click the Install button in the lower-right corner of the box. This will display a checklist of all the packages that will be installed.
  7. Click Confirm. It’s at the bottom of the Eclipse Marketplace window. This confirms that you want to install all the packages that are checked in the list. This begins the process of installing the selected packages.

    • If there are any packages you do not want to install, uncheck them before clicking “Confirm.”
    • If you want to install any additional plug-ins, such as the add-on for previous versions of Spring Tools, click Install More at the bottom of the Eclipse Marketplace window. Then click Install below any additional plug-ins you want to install. Click Install Now at the bottom of the Eclipse Marketplace window, when you are ready to install all the selected plug-ins.
  8. Agree to the Terms and Conditions and click Finish. Click the radio button next to “I accept the terms of the license agreements” and click Finish.
  9. Relaunch Eclipse. After installing Spring Tools in Eclipse, close Eclipse and then launch it again. Spring Tools is now installed and ready to use.

Installing the Spring Tools Suite Distribution of Eclipse

  1. Go to https://spring.io/tools in a web browser. This is the website where you can download Spring Tools Suite. Spring Tools Suite is an Eclipse distribution that comes with Spring Tools (Spring Boot) already pre-installed.
  2. Click the Spring Tools for Eclipse download link for your operating system. There are four download links below “Spring Tools for Eclipse.” Click the Windows x86_64 link if you are using Windows. Click the MacOS x86_64 link if you are using an Intel-based Mac. Click MacOS ARM_64 if you are using an ARM-based Mac. Click Linux x86_64 if you are using Linux.
  3. Open the installation file. Click the installation file in your web browser or Downloads folder. This will install Spring Tools Suite automatically. The way it does this is different, depending on which operating system you are using.

    • If you are using Windows, you’ll need to install the latest version of Java in order to install Spring Tools Suite. The JAR installation file will install Spring Tools Suite at whichever location you launch the file from. You may want to copy and paste the installation file to whichever location you want to install Spring Tools Suite at before launching the file.
    • If you are using a Mac, open the installation DMG file. Spring Tools Suite will start installing automatically. Be sure to drag the Spring Tools Suite app icon to the Applications folder once the installation is complete.
    • If you are using Linux, you will need to extract the contents of the downloaded tar.gz file to the location you want to install Spring Tools Suite at. It contains the Spring Tools Suite executable file.
  4. Launch Spring Tools Suite. If you are using Windows or Linux, navigate to the folder that you installed or extracted the Spring Tools Suite installation file to. Then click the Spring Tools Suite executable file. If you are using Mac, navigate to the Applications folder and click the Spring Tools Suite app file.
  5. Select a workspace folder. The first time you run Eclipse, you will need to select a workspace folder. Click Launch to use the default workspace folder location. If you want to select a different location to use as your workspace folder, click Browse and select the location you want to use as your workspace. Then click Open. This launches Eclipse with Spring Tools (Spring Boot) already installed.

Creating a Spring Boot Project

  1. Go to https://start.spring.io/ in a web browser. This website allows you to enter the information and select the dependencies of your Spring project. It will then generate a zip file containing all the files needed to start your Spring project.
  2. Select which build tool you want to use. Click the radio option next to which build tool you want to use below “Project” in the upper-left corner. You can select a Maven project or a Gradle project.
  3. Select which programming language you want to use. Click the radio option next to which programming language you want to use in the upper-left corner. You can select Java, Kotlin, or Groovy.
  4. Select which version of Spring Boot you are using. Click the radio option next to the version of Spring Boot you are using. If you are not sure, use the default setting.
  5. Enter your project metadata. Use the form below “Metadata” to enter your project’s metadata. You’ll need to provide the following information:[2] X Research source

    • Group: This will be the groupID attribute for your project.
    • Artifact: This is generally the name of the project. This will be the artifactID attribute
    • Name: This is usually teh same as teh Artifact name. If the name of your project is different than the artifactID, you can enter the name here.
    • Description: Use this space to enter a brief description of your project.
    • Package name: This is the root package name. This is generally the same as the Group name. If you want to use a different root package name, you can enter it here.
  6. Select your project packaging. You can package your project as a JAR file or a WAR file:[3] X Research source

    • JAR: JAR files are self-contained, executable Java programs. They can contain compiled Java code, manifest files, XML configuration data, JSON configuration data, as well as images and audio.
    • WAR: WAR files contain files related to a web project. They may contain XML, JSP, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript files that can be deployed on any servlet.
  7. Select which version of Java you are using. Click the radio option next the version of Java you want to use. You can use java 8, Java 11, or Java 17.
  8. Add dependencies to your project. Spring Boot allows you to add a variety of dependencies to your project. Use the following steps to add dependencies to your project:

    • Click Add Dependencies in the upper-right corner.
    • Use the search bar at the top to search for dependencies.
    • Click a dependency to add it.
  9. Click Generate. It’s in the lower-left corner at the bottom of the screen. This will generate and download a zip file containing all the files needed to start your Spring Boot project in Eclipse.

    • Alternatively, you can click Explorer to view all the different files in your project. You can view the source code and download individual files.
    • Click Share to get a link to your project that you can copy and send to other people to view.
  10. Extract the zip file. Once you download the zip file with your project files extract it. It’s best to extract it to your workplace folder or a location you will remember.
  11. Open Eclipse. Make sure you have Spring Boot installed in Eclipse or you are using the Spring Tools distribution of Eclipse. Click the Eclipse icon to launch Eclipse.

    • If Eclipse doesn’t automatically open to your project, you’ll need to open it, or create a new project.
  12. Import your Spring Boot project. This will import the Spring Boot files you created, downloaded, and extracted into Eclipse so that you can begin coding your project. Use the following steps to import your Spring Boot project files:[4] X Research source

    • Click File in the menu bar at the top.
    • Click Import.
    • Expand the “Maven” or “Gradle” folder.
    • Click Existing Maven Project or Existing Gradle Project
    • Click Next.
    • Click Browse in the upper-right corner.
    • Select the folder containing the project files that you downloaded and extracted.
    • Click Open.
    • Click Finish.

This article was co-authored by wikiHow staff writer, Travis Boylls. Travis Boylls is a Technology Writer and Editor for wikiHow. Travis has experience writing technology-related articles, providing software customer service, and in graphic design. He specializes in Windows, macOS, Android, iOS, and Linux platforms. He studied graphic design at Pikes Peak Community College.
This article has been viewed 42,511 times.Learn more…

Java Spring Framework is an open-source framework that is used for creating enterprise-grade, stand-alone applications that run on the Java Virtual Machine. As useful as it is, Java Spring Framework takes a lot of time and knowledge to set up, and deploy. Spring Boot makes this process easier using autoconfiguration, and an opinionated approach that allows Spring Boot to decide which dependencies and packages are right for your project. Spring Boot helps developers that run on their own without relying on an external web server.[1] X Research source On Eclipse, Spring Boot is referred to as Spring Tools Suite. This wikiHow article teaches you how to install Spring Tools Suite.

Intro

To those who develop in java nowadays, it’s almost impossible to miss Spring framework and more specifically Spring Boot. Using this development stack, we gain more productivity and agility from small to large sized java projects. In this guide I’ll demonstrate how to install, configure eclipse and create a simple Hello-World using java, eclipse and spring boot.

The github repository of the example project of this post, can be found at: https://github.com/danielpadua/java-spring-eclipse-example

Install Spring boot STS in Eclipse
Install Spring boot STS in Eclipse

Running Multiple Instances of the Same Local App

Since STS 3.7.3 the Boot Dashboard supports multiple launch configurations per project. If a project has more than one associated launch config, then they will automatically show up as children of the project’s node in the tree.

All the features of the boot dashboard work for those individual launch configs, as well as selections of them, in the ways you would expect. For examle, you can start/debug/stop them, either individually or in groups. You can jump to the associated console view, open a browser window for that running application, set a default path per launch config (in case you want to have different default path settings for your launch configs), tag them, and so on.

The project node in the dashboard also functions as a shortcut for all its children. It displays a quick summary of the individual launch configs and allows you to execute bulk actions on them, like start or stop them all at once.

To reduce clutter and to maintain the simplicity of the UI for the common case where there’s just one launch configuration per-project, a ‘Hide Solitary Launch Configurations’ filter is applied to the Dashboard by default, but you can disable this filter if you wish:

A single configuration is created automatically when an app is launched. To help you deal with multiple launch configs for a project, the context menu provides some actions that allow you: to quickly open a launch config editor; to duplicate an existing launch config; or to delete one.

Tip: If you want to run multple instances of a single local app simultaneously (e.g. you want to bind multiple local instances of a service via Eureka), you can set the property

server.port=0

to let spring-boot pick a port dynamically (otherwise all but one of your launches will fail because the port is already bound).

Nevertheless there might be some launch configs in your workspace that you do not like to see in the boot dashboard. For this case the Spring Boot launch config provides an option that hides it.

Working with Cloud Foundry

In this section we will move beyond local applications and take a look using the Boot Dash with remote apps deployed to a cloud runtime.

NGROK Tunneling local services for mixed deployments

Once you have deployed your apps on Cloud Foundry, you often don’t need to work on everything locally at the same time. Usually you focus on certain parts of the application and sometimes you would like to use use even both: some services running on Cloud Foundry and some services running on your local machine in your IDE. But how do they interact?

As an early experiment, we built a specific feature into the boot dashboard that lets you use all your services and apps on CF and have them call individual services running on your local machine. That way you can focus on individual projects of your landscape and continue to use Cloud Foundry for the rest of your world. You can quickly iterate and work on the code locally – and test it while working with the other parts on Cloud Foundry.

The way this works is: You have a service discovery mechanism for your microservices in place. At the moment we support the Eureka service discovery service for this feature. You can start your local Spring Boot app using a special action called “(re)start and expose app via ngrok”. Executing this action will (re)start your local app on your machine. At the same time the action will create a public visible tunnel to this app using the ngrok service. As a result, you get a publicly visible URL that routes all its traffic to your local machine and to the local Spring Boot app that is running on your local machine. The app is automatically configured to register with the remote Eureka using this publicly visible tunnel URL.

Clients to this service will now get this tunnel URL from Eureka instead of (or in addition to) the default instance of your service that might be running on Cloud Foundry already – and will call your locally running service instead of the one on CF. You can iterate on your local service quickly or even debug it.

This mixed deployment scenario is obviously not useful for production or team environments, where multiple people are using the applications on CF simultaneously. But this is extremely useful for testing and development environments.

How to Run Spring Boot project in Eclipse IDE for absolute beginners
How to Run Spring Boot project in Eclipse IDE for absolute beginners

Spring Boot Dev Tools Integration

In section we will take a deeper look at using the Spring Boot Devtools in combination with the boot dashboard.

Quickly deploy code changes

For local apps, using the Spring Boot Devtools is straightforward. As soon as you add the Spring Boot Devtools to your project as a dependency (there is an easy menu option for that in the Spring category of the Project exlorer context menu) and start your app, it will listen for local changes to configuration and class files and kick a restart of the app for you automatically. You don’t even need to restart the app yourself, the Spring Boot Devtools will do that for you automatically. Since STS/Eclipse produces and updates class files whenever you save a file, all this happens automatically for you when working within STS.

This story gets more interesting if you run your Spring Boot apps on a remote runtime like Cloud Foundry. In principle, you can use the Spring Boot Devtools in such a remote setting as well, but it requires a bit more work. The good news is that the Spring Boot Dashboard helps you with that.

As soon as you deploy or restart (and therefore update) a Spring Boot app on Cloud Foundry (using the boot dashboard) that has the Spring Boot Devtools on its classpath, the boot dashboard will configure the boot app on CF for the remote usage of the devtools automatically. This includes primarily the setting of a remote secret – to allow remote devtools access to it.

Once the devtools-enabled boot app is running on Cloud Foundry, you can easily start the boot devtools remote client application for it. This client application runs locally on your machine and connects to the remote application on Cloud Foundry. It watches for file changes, uploads them to the app on Cloud Foundry and triggers a restart of the app on Cloud Foundry.

Since the remote client app will watch for file changes within the project on your local machine, you can continue to work within your IDE as usual. Changed files are automatically updated to the Cloud Foundry version of the app by the remote client app. The counterpart on Cloud Foundry will restart the boot app once those changed files are stored to the app on Cloud Foundry. This works for newly compiled source code as well as for changed resource files.

This allows you to achieve quick turnaround cycles when working on your project even if it is deployed to a remote cloud runtime.

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Spring Tool Suite 3.6.4 was just released last week. This blog post is a tutorial demonstrating some of the new features STS provides to create and work with Spring Boot applications.

In this tutorial you’ll learn how to:

We use the “New Spring Starter” wizard to create a basic spring boot app.

Spring boot provides so called ‘starters’. A starter is set of classpath dependencies, which, together with Spring Boot auto configuration lets you get started with an app without needing to do any configuration. We pick the ‘web’ starter as we’ll build a simple ‘Hello’ rest service.

The wizard is a GUI frontend that, under the hood, uses the web service at start.spring.io to generate some basic scaffolding. You could use the web service directly yourself, download the zip it generates, unpack it, import it etc. Using the STS wizard does all of this at the click of a button and ensures the project is configured correctly so you can immediately start coding.

After you click the finish button, your workspace will look something like this:

The

HelloBootApplication

Java-main class generated by start.spring.io is the only code in our app at the moment. Thanks to the ‘magic’ of spring boot, and because we added the ‘web’ starter to our dependencies, this tiny piece of code is already a fully functional web server! It just doesn’t have any real content yet. Before adding some content, let’s learn how to run the app, and verify it actually runs in the process.

Spring boot apps created by the wizard come in two flavors ‘jar’ or ‘war’. The Starter wizard let’s you choose between them in its ‘packaging’ option. A great feature of spring-boot is that you can easily create standalone ‘jar’ packaged projects that contain a fully functional embedded web server. All you need to do to run your app, is run its Java Main type, just like you do any other plain Java application. This is a huge advantage as you don’t have to mess around with setting up local or remote Tomcat servers, war-packaging and deploying. If you really want to do things ‘the hard way’ you can still choose ‘war’ packaging. However there’s really no need to do so because:

Note: We won’t cover how to deploy apps to Cloud Foundry here, but in this article you can learm more about using Cloud Foundry Eclipse to do that directly from your IDE.

Now, if you understood what I just said, then you probably realize you don’t actually need any ‘special’ tooling from STS to run the app locally. Just click on the Java Main type and select “Run As >> Java Application” and voila. Also all of your standard Eclipse Java debugging tools will ‘just work’. However, STS provides a dedicated launcher that does basically the same thing but adds a few useful bells and whistles. So let’s use that instead.

Your app should start and you should see some output in the console view:

You can open your app running locally at http://localhost:8080. All you’ll get is a

404

error page, but that is exactly as expected since we haven’t yet added any real content to our app.

Now, what about the bells and whistles I promised? “Run As >> Boot App” is pretty much a plain Java launcher but provides some extra options to customize the launch configurations it creates. To see those options we need to open the “Launch Configuration Editor”, accessible from the or toolbar button:

If you’ve used the Java Launch Configuration Editor in Eclipse, this should look familiar. For a Boot Launch Configuration, the ‘Main’ tab is a little different and has some extra stuff. I won’t discuss all of the extras, you can find out more in the STS 3.6.4 release notes. So let’s just do something simple, for example, override the default http port

8080

to something else, like

8888

. You can probably guess that this can be done by setting a system property. In the ‘pure’ Java launcher you can set such properties via command-line arguments. But what, you might wonder, is the name of that property exactly “spring.port”, “http.port”, “spring.server.port”? Fortunately, the launch configuration editor helps. The Override Properties table provides some basic content assist. You just type ‘port’ and it makes a few suggestions:

Select

server.port

add the value

8888

in the right column and click “Run”.

If you followed the steps exactly up to this point, your launch probably terminates immediately with an exception:


Error: Exception thrown by the agent : java.rmi.server.ExportException: Port already in use: 31196; nested exception is: java.net.BindException: Address already in use

This may be a bit of a surprise, since we just changed our port didn’t we? Actually the port conflict here is not from the http port but a JMX port used to enable “Live Bean Graph Support” (I won’t discuss this feature in this Blog post, see STS 3.6.4 release notes).

There are a few things we could do to avoid the error. We could open the editor again and change the JMX port as well, or we could disable ‘Live Bean Support’. But probably we don’t really want to run more than one copy of our app in this scenario. So we should just stop the already running instance before launching a new one. As this is such a common thing to do, STS provides a Toolbar Button for just this purpose. Click the Button, the running app is stopped and restarted with the changes you just made to the Launch Configuration now taking effect. If it worked you should now have a

404

error page at

http://localhost:8888

instead of

8080

. (Note: the Relaunch button won’t work if you haven’t launched anything yet because it works from your current session’s launch history. However if you’ve launched an app at least once, it is okay to ‘Relaunch’ an app that is already terminated)

Overriding default property values from the Launch Configuration editor is convenient for a ‘quick override’, but it probably isn’t a great idea to rely on this to configure many properties and manage more complex configurations for the longer term. For this it is better to manage properties in a properties file which you can commit to SCM. The starter Wizard already conveniently created an empty

application.properties

for us.

To help you edit

application.properties

STS 3.6.4 provides a brand new Spring Properties Editor. The editor provides nice content assist and error checking:

The above screen shot shows a bit of ‘messing around’ with the content assist and error checking. The only property shown that’s really meaningful for our very simple ‘error page App’ right now is

server.port

. Try changing the port in the properties file and it should be picked up automatically when you run the app again. However be mindful that properties overridden in the Launch Configuration take priority over

application.properties

. So you’ll have to uncheck or delete the

server.port

property in the Launch Configuration to see the effect.

Let’s make our app more interesting. Here’s what we’ll do:

To create the rest service you could follow this guide. Hover we’re doing something even simpler and more direct.

Go ahead and create a controller class with this code:


package demo; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestParam; import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController; @RestController public class HelloController { @RequestMapping("/hello") public String hello(@RequestParam String name) { return "Hello "+name; } }

Try this out by Relaunching () your app. The URL

http://localhost:8888/hello?name=Kris

should return a text message “Hello Kris”.

This is actually quite easy to do, and you might be familiar with Spring’s @Value annotation. However, using

@Value

you won’t be able get nice content assist. Spring Properties Editor won’t be aware of properties you define that way. To understand why, it is useful to understand a little bit about how the Spring Properties Editor gets its information about the known properties.

Some of the Spring Boot Jars starting from version 1.2.x contain special JSON meta-data files that the editor looks for on your project’s classpath and parses. These files contain information about the known configuration properties. If you dig for a little, you can find these files from STS. For example, open “spring-boot-autoconfigure-1.2.2.RELEASE.jar” (under “Maven Dependencies”) and browse to “META-INF/spring-configuration-metadata.json”. You’ll find properties like

server.port

being documented there.

For our own user-defined properties to be picked-up by the editor we have to create this meta data. Fortunately this can be automated easily provided you define your properties using Spring Boot @ConfigurationProperties. So define a class like this:


package demo; import org.springframework.boot.context.properties.ConfigurationProperties; import org.springframework.stereotype.Component; @Component @ConfigurationProperties("hello") public class HelloProperties { /** * Greeting message returned by the Hello Rest service. */ private String greeting = "Welcome "; public String getGreeting() { return greeting; } public void setGreeting(String greeting) { this.greeting = greeting; } }

The

@ConfigurationProperties("hello")

tells Boot to take configuration properties starting with

hello.

and try to inject them into corresponding Bean properties of the

HelloProperties

Bean. The

@Component

annotation marks this class so that Spring Boot will pick up on it scanning the classpath and turn it into a Bean. Thus, if a configuration file (or another property source) contains a property

hello.greeting

then the value of that property will be injected into

setGreeting

of our

HelloProperties

Bean.

Now, to actually use this property all we need is a reference to the bean. For example to customize the message returned by the rest service, we can add a

@Autowired

field to the

HelloController

and call its

getGreeting

method:


@RestController public class HelloController { @Autowired HelloProperties props; @RequestMapping("/hello") public String hello(@RequestParam String name) { return props.getGreeting()+name; } }

Relaunch your app again and try to access

http://localhost:8888/hello?name=yourname

. You should get the default “Welcome yourname” message.

Now go ahead and try editing

application.properties

and change the greeting to something else. Allthough we already have everything in place to correctly define the property at run-time, you’ll notice that the editor is still unaware of our newly minted property:

What’s still missing to make the editor aware is the

spring-configuration-metadata.json

file. This file is created at build-time by the

spring-boot-configuration-processor

which is a Java Annotation Processor. We have to add this processor to our project and make sure it is executed during project builds.

Add this to the

pom.xml

:




org.springframework.boot


spring-boot-configuration-processor


Then perform a “Maven >> Update Project” to trigger a project configuration update. A Maven project configurator provided by STS will configure JDT APT and activate the processor for Eclipse builds. The warning will immediately disappear from the editor. You’ll also get proper Hover Info:

Now that the annotation processor has been activated, any future changes to your

HelloProperties

class will trigger an automatic update of the json metadata. You can try it out by adding some extra properties, or renaming your

greeting

property to something else. Warnings will appear / disappear as appropriate. If you are curious where your metadata file is, you can find it in

target/classes/META-INF

. The file is there, even though Eclipse does its best to hide it from you. Eclipse does this with all files in a project’s output folder. You can get around this though by using the

Navigator

view which doesn’t filter files as much and shows you a more direct view on the actual resources in your workspace. Open this view via “Window >> Show View >> Other >> Navigator”:

Note: We know that the manual step of adding the processor seems like an unnecessary complication. We have plans to automate this further in the future.

I hope you enjoyed this Tutorial. Comments and questions are welcome. In another post, coming soon, I will show you more adanced uses of

@ConfigurationProperties

and how the STS properties editor supports that.

Spring Boot is built on the top of the spring and contains all the features of spring. And is becoming a favorite of developers these days because of its rapid production-ready environment which enables the developers to directly focus on the logic instead of struggling with the configuration and setup. Spring Boot is a microservice-based framework and making a production-ready application in it takes very little time. Following are some of the features of Spring Boot:

  • It allows avoiding heavy configuration of XML which is present in spring
  • It provides easy maintenance and creation of REST endpoints
  • It includes embedded Tomcat-server
  • Deployment is very easy, war and jar files can be easily deployed in the tomcat server

For more information please refer to this article: Introduction to Spring Boot

Here we will be focusing on creating and setting up spring boot projects in Eclipse IDE. The Eclipse IDE is famous for the Java Integrated Development Environment (IDE), but it has a number of pretty cool IDEs, including the C/C++ IDE, JavaScript/TypeScript IDE, PHP IDE, and more.

Procedure:

  1. Install Eclipse IDE for Enterprise Java and Web Developer
  2. Create a Spring Boot Project in Spring Initializr
  3. Import Spring Boot Project in Eclipse IDE
  4. Search “maven” and choose Existing Maven Project
  5. Choose Next
  6. Click on the Browse button and select the extracted zip
  7. Click on the Finish button and we are done creating the Spring Boot project

Let us discuss these steps in detail alongside visual aids

Step 1: Install Eclipse IDE for Enterprise Java and Web Developer

Please refer to this article How to Install Eclipse IDE for Enterprise Java and Web Development and install the Eclipse IDE.

Step 2: Create a Spring Boot Project in Spring Initializr

Go to this link and create a Spring Boot project. Please fill in all the details accordingly and at last click on the GENERATE button below. This will download your Spring Boot project in zip format. Now extract the folder into your local machine. For more details in Spring Initializr refer to this article: Spring Initializr

Step 3: Import Spring Boot Project in Eclipse IDE

Go to the Eclipse IDE for Enterprise Java and Web Developer > File > Import as shown in the below image.

Step 4: Search “maven” and choose Existing Maven Project and click on the Next button as shown in the below image.

Step 5: Now click on the Browse button and select the extracted zip file that has been generated.

Step 6. And at last click on the Finish button and we are done creating the Spring Boot project

By now, Spring Boot project has been created as depicted in the below media

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Spring Tools 4 for Visual Studio Code

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Spring Tools 4

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Spring Tools 4

The all-new Spring Tool Suite 4. Free. Open source.

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Spring Tools 4

Tailored for developing enterprise applications using Spring Framework and Spring Boot, the new generation of Spring Tools provides world-class development support for your Spring applications. Our tools have deep knowledge of Spring built in.

The all-new Spring Tools can be used in various coding environments, ranging from Eclipse as a full-featured integrated development environment to Visual Studio Code and Theia as lightweight code editors. Continue to use your preferred environment and add great Spring tooling to it.

The new generation of Spring Tools is largely built from scratch, incorporating modern technologies and developer tooling architectures. It runs in separate processes, is built with performance in mind from the start, and knows about the latest Spring technologies.

Spring Tool Suite 4 makes it easy to get started. A direct and easy-to-use integration of the Spring Initializr and the famous Spring Guides allows you to go from nothing to a running Spring Boot app in seconds.

Understanding and quickly navigating source code is essential for coding. The new Spring Tools 4 understands your Spring-based source code and allows you to quickly get an overview and navigate to the important pieces of your Spring apps. Finding Spring elements and navigating to them has never been easier.

Code completion is a critical part of working with source code. The all-new Spring Tools 4 provides smart code completions for the Spring elements in your app.

Spring Tools 4 now bridges the gap between your source code and running Spring Boot applications. By taking advantage of the Spring Boot Actuators, we enriched the source code with detailed information from the running app (e.g., exact bean wiring information, conditional reports, configuration, details, and more).

Version 3 of the Spring Tool Suite is no longer under active development and does not receive any maintenance updates anymore. The last and final release can be found on the Spring Tool Suite 3 wiki, alongside details of how to upgrade to Spring Tools 4.

Loạt bài chủ đề Java trên trang stackjava.com bản quyền thuộc Trần Hữu Cương. Bài viết đăng trên blog Techmaster được sự đồng ý của tác giả.

Thầy Trần Hữu Cương hiện là giảng viên Techmater khoá Lộ trình Java Spring Boot Full Stack

Link gốc bài viết tại đây Cài đặt Spring Tool Suite Cho Eclipse.

Spring Boot Simple Project step by step using Mysql Database
Spring Boot Simple Project step by step using Mysql Database

Working with properties

Spring Boot does a lot of things automatically for you. But that doesn’t mean you can’t customize this default behavior. One way to customize the behavior is in code, the other one is by using properties. And Spring Boot offers a huge number of properties.

Assuming you want to define the port your Spring Boot app is running on. Just open the “application.properties” or “application.yml” file (depending on whether you prefer property or YAML format for your config files) and go. The Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE provide an enhanced editor experience that offers code completion for all the available Spring Boot properties.

Beyond the code completion, which offers a full list of properties together with documentation hints and types of those properties, the editor also checks keys and values for correctness. If, for example, a property is unknown, it will let you know via a warning. If the value that you put in doesn’t match the type of the property, an error will appear.

Cài đặt Spring Tool Suite Cho Eclipse.

Các bạn cũng có thể download sẵn bản IDE Spring Tool Suite base trên Eclipse tại: https://spring.io/tools/sts/all

Nó có sẵn các phiên bản cho Window, Linux hay Mac

Ở đây mình sẽ cài Spring tool suite vào eclipse, bản Eclipse mình sử dụng là Neon.3 Release (4.6.3)

– Truy cập Eclipse Marketplace

– Gõ sts hoặc Spring tool để tìm kiếm Spring Tool > Click Install

– Chọn Confirm

– Chọn Accept > Finish

– Hiển thị các tính năng của Spring: Window > Perspect > Open Perspect > Other > Spring

– Sau khi chọn hiển thị, các bạn sẽ thấy biểu tượng Spring ở góc phải của Eclipse

Spring Boot: A Tutorial for Beginners | in28minutes | Ranga Karanam
Spring Boot: A Tutorial for Beginners | in28minutes | Ranga Karanam

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A Spring Boot project can be created in many ways. It’s a crucial concept required for Microservices Certification and is an integral part of its course curriculum. In this Spring Boot Eclipse and CLI Setup blog, I would be exploring two different options for creating Spring Boot projects with Eclipse & Maven. They are as follows:

At the end of the blog, I would also be showcasing a Hello World example using Spring Boot.

Let us now explore the first option.

Step 1: To use Eclipse on Windows, you need to first install Java Development Kit (JDK). You can download JAVA from the Oracle site.

Step 2: Accept the License Agreement and choose the executable file for the operating system. Here I would be downloading for Windows with 64 bit. Refer to the snapshot below.

Step 3: Once the download is complete, run the exe for install JDK. and click Next. Refer to the snapshot below.

Step 4: After the installation is complete click on Close.

Step 5: Now, set the environment variables in Java.

Step 5.1: Right-click on My Computer/This PC -> More -> Properties.

Step 5.2: Go to Advanced System Settings -> Environment Variables.

Step 5.3: Add JAVA_HOME variable in the Windows environment, and point it to your Java JDK folder. Refer to the snapshot below.

Step 5.4: Update the PATH variable, and append the Java bin folder. Refer to the snapshot below.

Step 5.6: To verify if Java is installed or not, type java -version on the command prompt.

Step 6: After JAVA has been configured in your PC, you can download Eclipse IDE for JAVA JEE Developers and extract these files to a specific folder.

Step 7: Once you are done installing Eclipse on your PC, go to Help -> Eclipse MarketPlace. A dialog box opens up with a list of all the available software. Search for Spring Tool Suite (STS) and Install it.

Step 8: Once the tool is installed, click on File -> New -> Other. A dialog box opens up. In that, select Spring Boot Starter Project under the Spring Boot option and click Next.

Step 9: In the next screen that opens up, choose the following for your project:

Here, make sure you select Maven as Type and click Next. Refer to the snapshot below.

Step 10: In the next dialog box that shows up, select the dependencies that you want to add to your Spring Boot Eclipse Project and click Finish. Refer the snapshot below.

Step 11: Now, you will observe that your SpringBoot Eclipse project has been created on the left-hand side of the Eclipse IDE.

Step 12: After the project is created, configure the classes for your application according to your needs.

Step 13: To run this newly created Spring Boot Eclipse project, right-click on the project, and select Run As – > Spring Boot App. Internally this method creates an instance of the embedded Tomcat server at the default port of 8080 and runs the application in it. Refer to the snapshot below.

Now, let us explore the second option.

Spring Boot CLI Setup

Step 1: To create Spring Boot Eclipse project first download Apache Maven and Spring Boot CLI from their respective official sites.

Step 2: Download Apache Maven

Step 2.1: Visit Maven official website and download the Maven zip file, for example, apache-maven-3.5.2-bin.zip.

Step 2.2: Unzip it to the folder you want to install Maven.

Assume that you unzip to this directory C:pache-maven-3.5.2.

Step 2.3: Add M2_HOME and MAVEN_HOME variables in the Windows environment, and point it to your Maven folder.

Step 2.4: Update the PATH variable, and append the Maven bin folder –C:pache-maven-3.5.2in.Refer to the snapshot below.

Step2.5: Verify whether maven is installed or not, with mvn -version command in the command prompt.

Step 3: Download the Spring Boot CLI tool

Step 3.1: Download Spring Boot CLI from its official website.

Step 3.2: Unzip the downloaded file the folder you want to install Spring CLI.

Assume that you unzip it to this directory C:spring-2.0.0.RELEASE.

Step 3.3: Add SPRING_HOME variable in the Windows environment, and point it to your Spring folder. Refer to the snapshot below.

Step 3.4: Update the PATH variable, and append the Spring bin folder – C:spring-2.0.0.RELEASEin. Refer to the snapshot below.

Step 3.5: Verify whether Spring is installed or not, with spring –version command in the command prompt.

Step 4: Now go to your project directory where you have created the Spring project and copy the path.

Step 5: Change the working directory to the project path on the command prompt using the command cd. Assume here the path is C:UsersSahitiDesktopExample.

Step 6: Run the project using the command mvn spring-boot:run

Now let us create a Hello World Application in both the ways.

Initially, let us create a maven project by choosing Spring Starter project wizard from the file menu of Eclipse IDE with the name HelloWorld_Example and select the required dependencies.

This application has an auto-created Java file.This Java file acts an entry point for the application. It imports classes and uses annotations. Refer to the snapshot below.

Even though this application acts ready as a stand-alone application, we will still add a configuration file to it. This will help us handle the HTTP requests. Refer to the snapshot below.

Now, run the application as a Spring Boot App. You observe that the application has started and produces the following output on the console.

This application runs on 8080. So, if we pass /hello request to the following port number, then it produces the message returned from the requested method in the configuration file. Refer to the snapshot below.

If you want to run this project using the Spring Boot CLI, then open the command prompt and change your working directory to the project path.

Now type mvn spring-boot:run to run this project. This will give you the following output indicating whether the application has started or not.

Now you can run on the browser and it this produces the same output as the previous.

If you wish to learn Spring frameworks and build your own applications, then check out our Spring Framework course which comes with instructor-led live training and real-life project experience. This training will help you understand in depth and help you achieve mastery over the subject. To know more about Spring Frameworks, enroll for this Spring Course online.

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Spring is everywhere. It is at the heart of most modern business applications, in the center of modern cloud-based microservice applications, and used by millions of developers around the globe. And Spring Boot is at the heart of the current renaissance of Spring, making it easy, convenient, and extremely efficient to implement applications and services on top of Java.

Spring Boot Full Course - Learn Spring Boot In 4 Hours | Spring Boot Tutorial For Beginner | Edureka
Spring Boot Full Course – Learn Spring Boot In 4 Hours | Spring Boot Tutorial For Beginner | Edureka

Running Spring Boot apps

Suppose we have a simple Spring Boot application that we got from importing the “Rest Service” guide. It implements a simple @RestController and serves some JSON back to the user. In order to run this app, you could select “Run As → Spring Boot App” or create your own launch configuration in the Eclipse IDE. A better and easier way to run your Spring app is the Spring Boot Dashboard. It is a separate view in your IDE that you can activate from the toolbar (look for the Spring Boot icon).

The Spring Boot Dashboard lists all the projects from your workspace that are Spring Boot projects. You can select one or multiple projects and run them just by hitting the “(Re)Start” button. It will create a default launch config for your Spring Boot app automatically if you don’t have one yet.

The Spring Boot Dashboard helps you to deal with potentially many Spring Boot apps in your workspace. It allows you to filter them, start or even restart multiple apps in parallel, or easily jump to the right console view for a running app.

The Spring Boot Dashboard, in addition to managing the launching of apps, offers more facilities for gaining insights into your applications. Jumping to the properties view from a running and selected Spring Boot app in the dashboard, you will see not just a quick overview and a ready-to-use hyperlink that lets you jump to the frontend of the running app immediately (without looking up port numbers, etc.). You will also see two additional tabs that provide direct information from the running app: request mappings and beans. The request mappings tab, for example, shows you all the request mappings that the application serves together with its location in the source code. Double-clicks let you jump directly to the source code where the mapping is implemented. This allows you to easily navigate between your running app and your source code.

The beans tab offers you the list of beans that are live at runtime, created by the Spring application. You can browse through the list or filter for certain characters. The good thing here is that you can also see dependencies among those beans, so that you can gain insight into which bean depends on which other bean. You want to know, for example, which data source got injected into your controller? Search for your controller name in the list of live beans and you will see the answer right away.

Working with properties

Spring Boot does a lot of things automatically for you. But that doesn’t mean you can’t customize this default behavior. One way to customize the behavior is in code, the other one is by using properties. And Spring Boot offers a huge number of properties.

Assuming you want to define the port your Spring Boot app is running on. Just open the “application.properties” or “application.yml” file (depending on whether you prefer property or YAML format for your config files) and go. The Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE provide an enhanced editor experience that offers code completion for all the available Spring Boot properties.

Beyond the code completion, which offers a full list of properties together with documentation hints and types of those properties, the editor also checks keys and values for correctness. If, for example, a property is unknown, it will let you know via a warning. If the value that you put in doesn’t match the type of the property, an error will appear.

Spring Framework: A Tutorial for Beginners | in28minutes | Ranga Karanam
Spring Framework: A Tutorial for Beginners | in28minutes | Ranga Karanam

Using Spring Guides

In case you want to learn about a specific area of Spring and Spring Boot, you might want to take a look at the Spring Guides: https://spring.io/guides. They offer a comprehensive set of small tutorial-like step-by-step introductions to specific features of Spring. You can use them, for example, to learn how to implement your first RESTful service that delivers JSON.

Those guides can be imported into your Spring-Tools-enhanced Eclipse IDE by using the “Import Spring Getting Started Content” wizard, also available from the “New” menu. It is a great way to quickly import those guide projects, try them out, and learn from them.

Steps

Using the Eclipse Marketplace

  1. Launch Eclipse. Eclipse has an icon that resembles a blue circle with white horizontal lines and a yellow crescent moon to the left. Click the icon on your desktop, Windows Start menu, Applications folder (Mac), or Apps menu (Linux) to open Eclipse.

    • The first time you open Eclipse, you will need to select a folder to use as your workspace. Click Launch in the lower-right corner to use the default workspace folder. Click Browse to select a different location.
  2. Open or create a new project. By default, Eclipse will open the last project you were working on. To create a new project, click File in the menu bar at the top, and then click New. To open an existing project, click File in the menu bar, and then click Open. Select a file and click Open.

    • The first time you open Eclipse, a screen will appear giving you a variety of options. Click the option to open a new Java project to start a new project. Alternatively, you can click the option to open an existing project to begin work on an existing project.

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  3. Click Help. It’s the last option in the menu bar at the top of the screen. This displays the Help menu.
  4. Click Eclipse Marketplace. It’s near the bottom of the Help menu. This opens the Eclipse Marketplace in a new window.
  5. Type Spring Boot in the search box and press ↵ Enter. This displays a list of search results related to Spring Boot. On Eclipse, Spring Boot is called Spring Tools Suite.
  6. Click Install below the latest version of Spring Tools. The latest version of Spring Tools should appear at the top of the list. Click the Install button in the lower-right corner of the box. This will display a checklist of all the packages that will be installed.
  7. Click Confirm. It’s at the bottom of the Eclipse Marketplace window. This confirms that you want to install all the packages that are checked in the list. This begins the process of installing the selected packages.

    • If there are any packages you do not want to install, uncheck them before clicking “Confirm.”
    • If you want to install any additional plug-ins, such as the add-on for previous versions of Spring Tools, click Install More at the bottom of the Eclipse Marketplace window. Then click Install below any additional plug-ins you want to install. Click Install Now at the bottom of the Eclipse Marketplace window, when you are ready to install all the selected plug-ins.
  8. Agree to the Terms and Conditions and click Finish. Click the radio button next to “I accept the terms of the license agreements” and click Finish.
  9. Relaunch Eclipse. After installing Spring Tools in Eclipse, close Eclipse and then launch it again. Spring Tools is now installed and ready to use.

Installing the Spring Tools Suite Distribution of Eclipse

  1. Go to https://spring.io/tools in a web browser. This is the website where you can download Spring Tools Suite. Spring Tools Suite is an Eclipse distribution that comes with Spring Tools (Spring Boot) already pre-installed.
  2. Click the Spring Tools for Eclipse download link for your operating system. There are four download links below “Spring Tools for Eclipse.” Click the Windows x86_64 link if you are using Windows. Click the MacOS x86_64 link if you are using an Intel-based Mac. Click MacOS ARM_64 if you are using an ARM-based Mac. Click Linux x86_64 if you are using Linux.
  3. Open the installation file. Click the installation file in your web browser or Downloads folder. This will install Spring Tools Suite automatically. The way it does this is different, depending on which operating system you are using.

    • If you are using Windows, you’ll need to install the latest version of Java in order to install Spring Tools Suite. The JAR installation file will install Spring Tools Suite at whichever location you launch the file from. You may want to copy and paste the installation file to whichever location you want to install Spring Tools Suite at before launching the file.
    • If you are using a Mac, open the installation DMG file. Spring Tools Suite will start installing automatically. Be sure to drag the Spring Tools Suite app icon to the Applications folder once the installation is complete.
    • If you are using Linux, you will need to extract the contents of the downloaded tar.gz file to the location you want to install Spring Tools Suite at. It contains the Spring Tools Suite executable file.
  4. Launch Spring Tools Suite. If you are using Windows or Linux, navigate to the folder that you installed or extracted the Spring Tools Suite installation file to. Then click the Spring Tools Suite executable file. If you are using Mac, navigate to the Applications folder and click the Spring Tools Suite app file.
  5. Select a workspace folder. The first time you run Eclipse, you will need to select a workspace folder. Click Launch to use the default workspace folder location. If you want to select a different location to use as your workspace folder, click Browse and select the location you want to use as your workspace. Then click Open. This launches Eclipse with Spring Tools (Spring Boot) already installed.

Creating a Spring Boot Project

  1. Go to https://start.spring.io/ in a web browser. This website allows you to enter the information and select the dependencies of your Spring project. It will then generate a zip file containing all the files needed to start your Spring project.
  2. Select which build tool you want to use. Click the radio option next to which build tool you want to use below “Project” in the upper-left corner. You can select a Maven project or a Gradle project.
  3. Select which programming language you want to use. Click the radio option next to which programming language you want to use in the upper-left corner. You can select Java, Kotlin, or Groovy.
  4. Select which version of Spring Boot you are using. Click the radio option next to the version of Spring Boot you are using. If you are not sure, use the default setting.
  5. Enter your project metadata. Use the form below “Metadata” to enter your project’s metadata. You’ll need to provide the following information:[2] X Research source

    • Group: This will be the groupID attribute for your project.
    • Artifact: This is generally the name of the project. This will be the artifactID attribute
    • Name: This is usually teh same as teh Artifact name. If the name of your project is different than the artifactID, you can enter the name here.
    • Description: Use this space to enter a brief description of your project.
    • Package name: This is the root package name. This is generally the same as the Group name. If you want to use a different root package name, you can enter it here.
  6. Select your project packaging. You can package your project as a JAR file or a WAR file:[3] X Research source

    • JAR: JAR files are self-contained, executable Java programs. They can contain compiled Java code, manifest files, XML configuration data, JSON configuration data, as well as images and audio.
    • WAR: WAR files contain files related to a web project. They may contain XML, JSP, HTML, CSS, and JavaScript files that can be deployed on any servlet.
  7. Select which version of Java you are using. Click the radio option next the version of Java you want to use. You can use java 8, Java 11, or Java 17.
  8. Add dependencies to your project. Spring Boot allows you to add a variety of dependencies to your project. Use the following steps to add dependencies to your project:

    • Click Add Dependencies in the upper-right corner.
    • Use the search bar at the top to search for dependencies.
    • Click a dependency to add it.
  9. Click Generate. It’s in the lower-left corner at the bottom of the screen. This will generate and download a zip file containing all the files needed to start your Spring Boot project in Eclipse.

    • Alternatively, you can click Explorer to view all the different files in your project. You can view the source code and download individual files.
    • Click Share to get a link to your project that you can copy and send to other people to view.
  10. Extract the zip file. Once you download the zip file with your project files extract it. It’s best to extract it to your workplace folder or a location you will remember.
  11. Open Eclipse. Make sure you have Spring Boot installed in Eclipse or you are using the Spring Tools distribution of Eclipse. Click the Eclipse icon to launch Eclipse.

    • If Eclipse doesn’t automatically open to your project, you’ll need to open it, or create a new project.
  12. Import your Spring Boot project. This will import the Spring Boot files you created, downloaded, and extracted into Eclipse so that you can begin coding your project. Use the following steps to import your Spring Boot project files:[4] X Research source

    • Click File in the menu bar at the top.
    • Click Import.
    • Expand the “Maven” or “Gradle” folder.
    • Click Existing Maven Project or Existing Gradle Project
    • Click Next.
    • Click Browse in the upper-right corner.
    • Select the folder containing the project files that you downloaded and extracted.
    • Click Open.
    • Click Finish.

Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE

Apache Camel Framework Tutorial with Spring Boot, Eclipse and Maven
Apache Camel Framework Tutorial with Spring Boot, Eclipse and Maven

Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE

To make it even easier to write modern Spring Boot applications, the latest generation of the Spring Tools for the Eclipse IDE are well suited for getting started with Spring Boot and working on large microservice applications that are based on Spring Boot. This article walks you through the most important features of the tooling and provides great insight into a number of tips and tricks along the way.

Creating a Cloudfoundry ‘Target’

You can add a Cloud Foundry section to the boot dashboard clicking the big plus icon in the toolbar.

Once you entered your credentials and selected an org/space, a new section will appear in the boot dashboard, listing the apps that are deployed to this space on Cloud Foundry. You can see the name of the app as well as the number of instances that are configured and that are up and running.

The basic actions work for one or multiple apps on CF in the same or a very similar way to how they work for local apps. You can jump to the console output and it will appear in the console view of STS/Eclipse, you can start and stop apps, you can double-click them to get to a browser window for the running app, you can configure a default path for the app, and you can add/remove tags to/from those apps. You can even execute some of the actions (like start and stop) across targets, if you select multiple entries in the boot dashboard across those target sections.

In addition to the common actions that are suitable accross local and Cloud Foundry apps, there are also actions specifically for apps on Cloud Foundry. The boot dashboard allows you, for example, to delete an app entirely from Cloud Foundry, or to easily jump to the web console.

Create First Spring  Project In Eclipse Using Maven | First Spring Project | Spring Tutorial
Create First Spring Project In Eclipse Using Maven | First Spring Project | Spring Tutorial

Spring is everywhere

Spring is everywhere. It is at the heart of most modern business applications, in the center of modern cloud-based microservice applications, and used by millions of developers around the globe. And Spring Boot is at the heart of the current renaissance of Spring, making it easy, convenient, and extremely efficient to implement applications and services on top of Java.

Debugging Remote App over an SSH Tunnel

It is possible to attach the Eclipse/STS Java debugger directly to a remote application and debug it just like you would a local application.

The process for attaching the debugger to a remote application can be somewhat tedious to setup manually. For a CF application, for example, it would involve steps such as:

  • passing debug arguments to the remote JVM on launch
  • establishing an SSH tunnel to the remote application to forward debug traffic to / from your local machine to the remote JVM.
  • creating and properly configuring a remote debug launch configuration in STS/Eclipse to connect to the local tunnel.
  • launching the remote debug configuration.

For applications deployed via the Boot Dashboard we make this process very easy. All you have to do is (Re)start your app in debug
mode from the Boot Dashboard by clicking the icon in the toolbar. When you click that button. The app
is restarted and all of these above steps are performed automatically. The restart may take a little while (as it involves re-pushing the app
to set the right launch parameters on startup). Just sit back and wait and eventually the app will be deployed, an SSH tunnel created
and the Eclipse Java debugger is connected to the app.

You can debug the application that is running on the cloud runtime in the same way as local applications, including setting breakpoints, inspecting variables, or even hot-swapping code.

Note while debugging remote apps in this way does work, you will notice a significant slowdown in debugging and the debu UI. This is caused by the tunneling of the remote debug protocol over the SSH tunnel. As an alternative, you might want to consider running and debugging the app locally and connecting it up with the rest of your application services via the ngrok tunneling feature that we described earlier.

  • Installation (latest release + snapshots)
  • User Guide

    • Getting Started
    • Navigation
    • Live Application Information
    • Content Assist
    • Version Validation
    • Upgrade Support
    • Validations and Quick Fixes
    • WebFlux Support
    • Boot Properties Editor
    • Boot Dashboard
    • Other Editors
    • STS3
    • Custom VM args
  • FAQ
  • Changelog
  • Known Limitations & Issues
  • Report an Issue
  • Developer Manual

    • Overview
    • Language Server Integration into Clients
    • Communication with JDT LS
    • STS4 Language Server Protocol Extensions
How to Import Spring Boot project into Eclipse IDE
How to Import Spring Boot project into Eclipse IDE

Spring Tools 4: The new generation on the horizon

In the final section of this article, I want to give you a brief outlook at what is coming next. In December 2017 we launched the public beta of the next generation of Spring tooling. The so-called “Spring Tools 4” initiative and the corresponding public beta launch not just offers great tooling for Spring apps when working with the Eclipse IDE, but is also available for Visual Studio Code and Atom: https://spring.io/tools4.

The next generation includes all of what you have seen here in this article so far, and goes beyond that. It offers a super quick and easy source-code navigation to all the important pieces of your Spring Boot application. You will get easy access to all your request mappings, bean definitions, function implementations, data repositories, and more – just by selecting the “Go To Symbol” action.

In addition to that, your source code will be augmented with information from running Spring Boot applications. As soon as you start your Spring Boot app, real-time information from that app will appear in your source code, allowing you to get a unique insight into your running Spring Boot app. You will be able to see which beans are active, how they got wired to each other, which conditions have succeeded or failed and for what reason, and more.

Wanna give it a try? Feel free to take a look at: https://spring.io/tools4 – download and go! It is available as a ready-to-use Eclipse distribution (based on Eclipse Photon), and as extensions for Visual Studio Code, and Atom.

And feedback is always welcome. Please feel free to go to https://github.com/spring-projects/sts4/issues and raise questions, provide feedback, and report bugs and enhancement requests.

About the Author

Boot Dashboard

Well known from previous generations of the Spring Tool Suite, the Spring Tool Suite 4 also contains the boot dashboard for quickly running, re-starting, tagging, and inspecting Spring Boot projects in your workspace.

Please note, that this documentation applies to Eclipse only. There is however also a similar (but simplified) Vscode extension provided by Microsoft.

Introduction

Spring Boot is now a widely adopted technology to simplify your life when implementing Spring applications for the enterprise. Especially suitable for creating microservice-based applications, it has changed the way we think about small and easy to configure Spring applications dramatically. Together with Spring Cloud, it opens the door to truly cloud-native applications, composed out of probably many microservices. This creates a need for developers to be able to easily work with not just one, but many Boot applications simultaneously in their IDE.

This realization was the starting point for the Spring Boot Dashboard. Its focus is to help you deal with a potentially larger number of Spring-Boot-based microservice applications and make your life as a developer a lot easier when working on those projects in your IDE.

Working with Local Apps

The Spring Boot Dashboard comes as an additional view in STS/Eclipse. It is opened automatically in the Java perspective. You can also open it by pressing the Spring Boot button in your main toolbar. It opens up a simple view that is in sync with your workspace projects, showing those projects of your workspace that are Spring Boot projects.

The main purpose of the Boot Dashboard is to give you quick access to the things you do every day, every hour, or even more frequently. You can quickly start your boot apps (in run or debug mode) by selecting them in the boot dashboard and pressing the “run” or “debug” action in the toolbar. There is no faster way to launch your boot app than this. And since you probably are going to change code and want to restart your app, the action lets you restart your boot app, if it is already running. Change your code, press the “run” button in the boot dashboard, and your boot app gets stopped and restarted for you. Again, a simple one-click action.

The great thing about these actions (and many more) in the boot dashboard is that they operate on single or multiple projects at the same time. If you want to start or stop a bunch of boot apps at the same time, for example to startup a set of collaborating services, just select them all in the dashboard and press “run”. That’s it.

As soon as your boot app is being started, the boot dashboard visualizes that the app is starting – and it distinguishes between its startup phase (the VM is running, but the app is still initializing) and it is truly running and ready to use. The progress icon indicates the app is still starting up, the green “up” icon shows up as soon as the app is fully initialized and running. You don’t need to observe the log output until some “server started” message shows up or something like that. The boot dashboards icons will let you know.

Once the app is running, the port that it listens is displayed – for your convenience. You don’t have to scan the log output anymore to find out what port is being used by the app. The dashboard displays that information automatically. And in case you would like to jump to the console output of a running boot app, there is a quick action for that as well.

Often there is no need anymore to know about the port of a running app – since you don’t have to open a browser tab for the app yourself. Double-click on the project in the boot dashboard and it will open a new browser tab for you – directly navigating to the apps default URL.

By default, this opens an Eclipse/STS internal browser view. If you prefer to use an external browser, you can set this in the preferences.

By default, double-click will open the root url path ‘/’ on your app. If this is not what you want, you can customize that. Open the properties view, select the project in the boot dashboard and enter the default URL extension that you prefer. The double-click will open the default URL of the app + your customized extension to it.

In case you are not sure what URL extensions your application defines, you can select the “Request Mappings” tab in the properties view. All the request mappings of the running app are listed – your self-defined ones at the top, the ones coming from libraries at the bottom of that list. Double-clicking on the URL extension opens a browser for that extension, double-clicking on the code pointer opens the corresponding file of your project in an editor and jumps to the line that defines the request mapping.

The more microservice projects you have in your workspace, the more likely it is that you don’t work on all of them at the same time. You would like to focus on a subset. In Eclipse/STS, you might have created a working set, for example. The boot dashboard allows you to tag projects with an arbitrary number of tags (again, in the properties view). Those tags can then be used in the filter box (at the top of the boot dashboard) to reduce the number of projects that show up in the boot dashboard.

Installation

You can install the Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE into an existing Eclipse installation using the Eclipse Marketplace. Just open the marketplace client in Eclipse, search for Spring Tools and install the “Spring Tools (aka Spring IDE and Spring Tool Suite)” entry.

In case you prefer to use a ready-to-use distribution, you can go to https://spring.io/tools and download the Spring Tool Suite distribution, which is a full Eclipse distribution (based on the latest Eclipse release) with Spring Tools pre-installed.

Building Login Form Application using Spring MVC
Building Login Form Application using Spring MVC

Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE

To make it even easier to write modern Spring Boot applications, the latest generation of the Spring Tools for the Eclipse IDE are well suited for getting started with Spring Boot and working on large microservice applications that are based on Spring Boot. This article walks you through the most important features of the tooling and provides great insight into a number of tips and tricks along the way.

Spring MVC Tutorials

  • Spring Tutorial for Beginners
  • Spring MVC Tutorial for Beginners – Hello Spring 4 MVC
  • Install Spring Tool Suite for Eclipse
  • Configure Static Resources in Spring MVC
  • Spring MVC Interceptors Tutorial with Examples
  • Create a Multiple Languages web application with Spring MVC
  • Spring MVC File Upload Tutorial with Examples
  • Simple Login Java Web Application using Spring MVC, Spring Security and Spring JDBC
  • Spring MVC Security with Hibernate Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring MVC Security and Spring JDBC Tutorial (XML Config)
  • Social Login in Spring MVC with Spring Social Security
  • Spring MVC and Velocity Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring MVC and FreeMarker Tutorial with Examples
  • Use Template in Spring MVC with Apache Tiles
  • Spring MVC and Spring JDBC Transaction Tutorial with Examples
  • Use Multiple DataSources in Spring MVC
  • Spring MVC and Hibernate Transaction Tutorial with Examples
  • Spring MVC Form Handling and Hibernate Tutorial with Examples
  • Run background scheduled tasks in Spring
  • Create a Java Shopping Cart Web Application using Spring MVC and Hibernate
  • Simple CRUD example with Spring MVC RESTful Web Service
  • Deploy Spring MVC on Oracle WebLogic Server

Show More

Install Java EE in Eclipse IDE [2023] |Java EE Missing in Eclipse |Servlet & JSP Setup for Beginners
Install Java EE in Eclipse IDE [2023] |Java EE Missing in Eclipse |Servlet & JSP Setup for Beginners

Deploying to Cloud Foundry

Last, but not least, the Spring Boot Dashboard provides a direct integration with Cloud Foundry runtimes. In the same way as your local boot apps, a Cloud Foundry section in your dashboard will list the deployed and running apps, allows you to start and stop them. It also offers you to deploy your project via drag&drop to the Cloud Foundry instance and even debug a running app on Cloud Foundry.

Creating Spring Boot projects from scratch

The most famous way to create new Spring Boot projects is to go to https://start.spring.io and choose which Spring starter modules you wanna use. Once you do that, you can download a ZIP file of your new project and import that into your development environment.

The Spring Tools for Eclipse IDE come with a direct integration of that into your Eclipse IDE. Go to “File”, select “New” and choose the “Spring → Spring Starter Project”. The wizard lets you choose the Spring Initializr endpoint you would like to use (in case you have a custom one running within your company, for example) and then lets you select a boot version and offers all the Spring Boot starter modules that are around for that boot version. Just choose the ones that match your interest and click “Finish”. You end up with a ready-to-use Spring Boot project in your workspace – in just a few seconds.

Install Java EE in Eclipse IDE| Java EE Missing in Eclipse | Servlet and JSP Setup for Beginners
Install Java EE in Eclipse IDE| Java EE Missing in Eclipse | Servlet and JSP Setup for Beginners

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