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Glassfish Server Open Source | Overview[Edit]

Glassfish Server Administration for Beginners (Step-By-Step) - learn Other IT & Software

May 30, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.5 Available

We are pleased to announce the release today of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.5.

The main features of this release are a number of important bug fixes such as one in deployment-time recursive bytecode, resetting the security context if a principal has not changed, and several fixes in clustering.

Jakarta EE components have been updated for Mail, JSON Processing, and REST. Auxiliary components such as Jackson and Commons IO have also been updated to their latest version.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

November 30, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.11 Available

We are happy to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.11.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

This release sees an important fix where WebSockets would not work at all for applications on the default context root (e.g. https://example.com vs https://example.com/myapp).

This month we have concentrated on the AdminGUI and fixed an assortment of small but annoying defects in it. Various major components were updated, such as Jersey (Jakarta REST), Tyrus (Jakarta WebSockets) and Mojarra (Jakarta Faces).

To keep the project maintainable and well tested, several tests were added and improved as well.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

Glassfish Server Administration for Beginners (Step-By-Step) - learn Other IT & Software
Glassfish Server Administration for Beginners (Step-By-Step) – learn Other IT & Software

Overview[edit]

GlassFish is the Eclipse implementation of Jakarta EE (formerly the reference implementation from Oracle) and as such supports Jakarta REST, Jakarta CDI, Jakarta Security, Jakarta Persistence, Jakarta Transactions, Jakarta Servlet, Jakarta Faces, Jakarta Messaging, etc. This allows developers to create enterprise applications that are portable and scalable, and that integrate with legacy technologies. Optional components can also be installed for additional services.

Built on a modular kernel powered by OSGi, GlassFish runs straight on top of the Apache Felix implementation. It also runs with Equinox OSGi or Knopflerfish OSGi runtimes. HK2 abstracts the OSGi module system to provide components, which can also be viewed as services. Such services can be discovered and injected at runtime.

GlassFish is based on source code released by Sun and Oracle Corporation’s TopLink persistence system. It uses a derivative of Apache Tomcat as the servlet container for serving web content, with an added component called Grizzly which uses Java non-blocking I/O (NIO) for scalability and speed.

January 10, 2022 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.4 Available

We are pleased to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.4. This release provides implementations
of the Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform and Web Profile specifications. Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page. Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.4 implements the Jakarta EE 9.1 specification (Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform, Jakarta EE 9 Web Profile). GlassFish 6.2.4 brings initial support for JDK 18 (tested until ea29) and adds running several standalone Jakarta EE TCKs directly from the project. An import internal fix is removing a troublesome circular dependency between GlassFish and Jersey.

GlassFish 6.2.4 compiles and run with JDK 11 to JDK 18-EA releases.

Note this release requires at least JDK 11.

Install Glassfish Application Server On Windows
Install Glassfish Application Server On Windows

February 13, 2022 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.5 Available

We are pleased to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.5. This release provides implementations
of the Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform and Web Profile specifications. Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page. Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.5 implements the Jakarta EE 9.1 specification (Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform, Jakarta EE 9 Web Profile). GlassFish 6.2.5 updates and reenables a lot of tests that were disabled in previous versions (most after the GF 5 to 6 transition), once again improves JDK 17 compatibility (cases found by the new tests), fixes several bugs, and contains new versions of Hibernate Validator, Jackson and others.

GlassFish 6.2.5 compiles and run with JDK 11 to JDK 18-EA releases.

Note this release requires at least JDK 11.

October 29, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.10 Available

The GlassFish team is very happy to present you another great release of GlassFish.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

In this release a 10 months long operation to get an internal dependency to the slf4j-api removed finally got to fruition. This involved the intense cooperation of multiple teams, and we’re exceptionally happy to have finally been able to do this.

We also did a lot of work to make our builds repeatable, and we did a ton of refactoring to the internal security packages of GlassFish, making them easier to understand and therefore easier to maintain. Any external code depending on these internal packages (such as potentially custom LoginModules/Realms) may have to update (we recommend of course not depending on internal packages and using public APIs).

As every release, we integrated many component updates, and did a number of smaller fixes.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

How to Install GlassFish JAVA Application Server on Ubuntu 22.04
How to Install GlassFish JAVA Application Server on Ubuntu 22.04

Giới thiệu

Glassfish server là một application server mã nguồn mở được phát triền dựa trên nền JavaEE hổ trợ đầy đủ các tính năng cần thiết của JavaEE như web ứng dụng, Enterprise JavaBeans, JPA, JavaServer Faces, JMS, RMI, JavaServer Pages, Servlets, etc. Nó cho phép những nhà phát triển ứng dễ quản lý, cấu hình nhanh và linh hoạt. Glass server support nhiều nền tảng như windows, Linux, Mac Os…

April 27, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.4 Available

We are pleased to announce the release today of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.4.

The main features of this release are important bug fixes for things like a class loader leak, and again several fixes in the admin console such as the ability to upload a war file.

A new feature for ScatteredArchive has been added to GlassFsih Embedded.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

How to install and configure Glassfish application server ?
How to install and configure Glassfish application server ?

September 29, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.9 Available

We’re happy to present you with the latest GlassFish release.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

In this release the modularity of GlassFish is once again increased by moving the Jakarta Authentication implementation code to a new standalone project: Epicyro. We also enabled the GlassFish embedded tests again, which were dormant for a long time. Among the many updated components, Exousia was updated specifically to fix a bug with deployments on virtual servers, and the ORB was updated to fix a somewhat obscure bug where a remote EJB returned a JDK defined enum type.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

January 30, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.1 Available

We are pleased to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.1.

The main features of this release are an overhaul of some of the class loader mechanics (speeding up various operations), and making shutdown monitoring more reliable. A new docker image has been added as well (it will be officially published on docker hub later).
Furthermore in this release a number of components have been updated to their latest version, and the code can now be build with JDK 20ea.

Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.1 compiles and runs with JDK 11 to JDK 19 releases. MicroProfile support requires JDK 17 or higher. JDK 20ea30 has been succesfully used to compile and run GlassFish as well, but is not yet officially supported.

How to install Glassfish Server in NetBeans || 100% solution
How to install Glassfish Server in NetBeans || 100% solution

June 29, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.6 Available

We are very happy to present the release today of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.6.

The main features of this release are the newly added support of the MicroProfile REST Client and a new way to start GlassFish, which is a preparation for Docker images that will run GlassFish in the foreground in a single JVM process to save memory consumed by Docker containers.

This release also contains the usual amount of fixes, and a number of important component updates. Specifically the EclipseLink and Soteria updates fix important bugs (see their release notes).

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

November 18, 2021 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.3 Available

We are pleased to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.3. This release provides implementations
of the Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform and Web Profile specifications. Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page. Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.3 implements the Jakarta EE 9.1 specification (Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform, Jakarta EE 9 Web Profile). GlassFish 6.2.3 brings Admin console fixes, build times improvement, component updates, and bug fixes.

GlassFish 6.2.3 compiles with JDK 11 to JDK 17 and runs on JDK 11 to JDK 17. GlassFish 6.2.3 also compiles and runs on JDK 18-EA releases.

Note this release requires at least JDK 11.

Could not start GlassFish Server4.1 HTTP or HTTPS Listener port is occupied while server
Could not start GlassFish Server4.1 HTTP or HTTPS Listener port is occupied while server

August 28, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.8 Available

The entire GlassFish team is happy to present you another great GlassFish release.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

This release fixes multi-jar compatibility in GlassFish and does further preparations for JDK 21. It includes various component updates among which those for CDI, Faces, and JSON. Test coverage is improved by adding the TCKs for REST Client and Connectors. Finally, various CDI extensions have been optimised to reduce excessive and unnecessary calls to them.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

March 30, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.3 Available

We are pleased to announce the release today of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.3.

The main features of this release are various bug fixes for things like a StackOverflow exception, a deployment error, and creating JavaMail sessions using the admin console. Additionally components have been updated for Faces, Messaging, Persistence, and (MP) Config. Support for newer JDK versions has been solidified by a new HK2 release and ASM 9.5 integration.

Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.3 compiles and runs with JDK 11 to JDK 20 releases. MicroProfile support requires JDK 17 or higher.

GlassFish Server could not be started with JDK 19(default) || 100% solution || TyBscit || Java
GlassFish Server could not be started with JDK 19(default) || 100% solution || TyBscit || Java

Building

Prerequisites:

  • JDK8+
  • Maven 3.0.3+

Run the full build:


mvn install

Locate the Zip distributions:

  • appserver/distributions/glassfish/target/glassfish.zip
  • appserver/distributions/web/target/web.zip

Locate staged distributions:

  • appserver/distributions/glassfish/target/stage
  • appserver/distributions/web/target/stage

December 14, 2022 – The final version of Eclipse GlassFish 7 released

After huge effort by the Eclipse GlassFish team and a lot of fellow contributors, Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.0 is finally released.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

The main new feature is Jakarta EE 10 support, and everything that comes with that. Additionally GlassFish now provides support for the MicroProfile Config and MicroProfile JWT APIs, and the latest Jakarta MVC 2.0 release.

This release also features a massive overhaul and cleanup of the DOL module (Deployment Object Library), a large cleanup of how JNDI names are handled internally, and many fixes in the logging functionality and in the way how GlassFish servers start and stop.

Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.0 compiles and runs with JDK 11 to JDK 19 releases. MicroProfile support requires JDK 17 or higher.

How to install and Configure GlassFish Server  | Handle Not a Valid GlassFish Server Installation
How to install and Configure GlassFish Server | Handle Not a Valid GlassFish Server Installation

Releases[edit]

October 2003 – Sun Microsystems released Sun ONE Application Server 7 [4][5] that supports the J2EE 1.3 specification. It is based on the iPlanet Web Server and the J2EE reference implementation[6] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

March 2004 – Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8[7] that supports the J2EE 1.4 specification. In June 2004 update 1 is released.[8] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

8 February 2005 – Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8.1 that supports the J2EE 1.4 specification. This version introduced a major update to web services security (a precursor to the later JASPIC and Jakarta Authentication), Admin Console GUI enhancements, JavaServer Faces 1.1 Support (at this point not yet part of J2EE), performance enhancements, and support for Java SE 5.0.[9] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

6 June 2005 – Sun Microsystems launched the GlassFish project by publishing the vetted source of Sun Java System Application Server.[10][11] Builds of this early version identity themselves in the log as “sun-appserver-pe9.0”.[12]

31 January 2006 – Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8.2.[13] This version introduced bundling of the Derby database and Fast Infoset for web services.[14] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

4 May 2006 – Project GlassFish released the 1.0 version (a.k.a. Sun Java System Application Server 9.0) that supports the Java EE 5 specification.

15 May 2006 – Sun Java System Application Server 9.0, derived from GlassFish 1.0, is released.[15]

8 May 2007 – Project SailFin was announced at JavaOne as a sub-project under Project GlassFish. Project SailFin aims to add Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) servlet functionality to GlassFish.[16]

17 September 2007 – the GlassFish community released version 2.0 (a.k.a. Sun Java System Application Server 9.1) with full enterprise clustering capabilities, Microsoft-interoperable Web Services.

21 January 2009 – Sun Microsystems and the community released version GlassFish 2.1 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 2.1) which serves as the basis for the Sailfin 1.0 (a.k.a. Sun Communication Application Server 1.0).

28 October 2009 – SailFin 2.0 (a.k.a. Sun Communication Application Server 2.0) was released which leverages GlassFish 2.1.1 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 2.1.1) and adds a number of features including high availability, rolling upgrade, flexible network topology, better overload protection, Diameter support, improved diagnosability, Java based DCR files for the load balancer, and more.

10 December 2009 – GlassFish 3.0 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 3.0) was released. Being the Java EE reference implementation, this was the first application server to completely implement Java EE 6 JSR 316. JSR 316 was however approved with reservations.[17] In this version GlassFish adds new features to ease migration from Tomcat to GlassFish.[18] The other main new features are around modularity (GlassFish v3 Prelude already shipped with an Apache Felix OSGi runtime), startup time (a few seconds), deploy-on-change (provided by NetBeans and Eclipse plugins), and session preservation across redeployments.[19]

25 March 2010 – Soon after the acquisition of Sun Microsystems, Oracle issued a Roadmap for versions 3.0.1, 3.1, 3.2 and 4.0 with themes revolving around clustering, virtualization and integration with Coherence and other Oracle technologies. The open source community remains otherwise unaffected.

28 February 2011 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1. This version introduced support for ssh-based provisioning, centralized admin, clustering and load-balancing. It maintains its support for both the Web Profile and full Java EE 6 Platform specifications.

28 July 2011 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.1. This is fix release for GlassFish 3.1 with multiple component updates (Weld, Mojarra, Jersey, EclipseLink, …), JDK 7 support, AIX support and more.

29 February 2012 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.2. This release includes bug fixes and new features including administration console enhancements, transaction recovery from a database and new thread pool properties.

17 July 2012 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.2.2. This is a “micro” release to address some exceptional issues in the product.[20]

12 June 2013 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.0. This major release brings Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 7 support.[21]

9 September 2014 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1. This release includes many bug fixes (over a thousand) and the latest MR releases of CDI and WebSockets.[22]

7 October 2015 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1.1. This release includes many bug fixes and security fixes as well as updates to many underlying components.[23]

31 March 2017 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1.2. This release includes bug fixes.[24]

21 September 2017 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 5.0. This release includes Java EE 8 Open Source Reference Implementation and that the Java EE 8 umbrella specification and all the underlying specifications (JAX-RS 2.1, Servlet 4.0, CDI 2.0, JSON-B 1.0, Bean Validation 2.0, etc.) are finalized and approved.[25]

29 January 2019 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 5.1. This release is technically identical to Oracle’s GlassFish 5.0 but is fully build from the source code that Oracle transferred to the Eclipse Foundation and which was subsequently relicensed to EPL. Like GlassFish 5.0, 5.1 is Java EE 8 certified, but does not have any RI status. The main goal of this release is to prove that all source code has been transferred and can indeed be built into a fully compliant product.[26]

31 December 2020 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.0.0. This version is functionally largely identical to GlassFish 5.1 but implements Jakarta EE 9.[27] Jakarta EE 9 is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 8 (which is functionally identical to Java EE 8) but has its package and various constants changed from javax.* to jakarta.*

5 May 2021 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.1.0. This version is functionally identical to GlassFish 6.0.0 but implements Jakarta EE 9.1. Jakarta EE 9.1 is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 9 (which is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 8 and Java EE 8) but has support for JDK 11. This release requires JDK 11.

28 August 2021 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.2.1. This version has improved support for JDK 17 and includes a new component Eclipse Exousia, the standalone Jakarta Authorization implementation. GlassFish 6.2.1 compiles with JDK 11 to JDK 17

14 December 2022 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 7.0.0. This is the first version containing larger refactoring and code cleanup, large amount of bugfixes and also new features.[28] Implements new Jakarta Concurrency specification, and supports JDK 11 but recommends usage of JDK17.

February 27, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.2 Available

We are happy to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.2.

The main features of this release are the updates of various components, fixing a wide array of issues. Specifically with WaSP 3.2.0 a major change is that it now includes the Pages Standard Tags, so the separate jar for this is no longer present in GlassFish. We also fixed an important regression where requesting a directory from the ClassLoader failed for exploded deploys. This now works again. Additionally the version (7.0.2 now) is reported correctly again, which can be important for package managers such as brew.

Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.2 compiles and runs with JDK 11 to JDK 19 releases. MicroProfile support requires JDK 17 or higher. JDK 20ea30 has been succesfully used to compile and run GlassFish as well, but is not yet officially supported.

Web Server vs  Application Server
Web Server vs Application Server

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Release 7.0.11”. 4 December 2023. Retrieved 19 December 2023.
  2. ^ a b “Eclipse GlassFish”. projects.eclipse.org.
  3. ^ Beaton, Wayne (10 May 2018). “Eclipse GlassFish”. projects.eclipse.org.
  4. ^ “Sun ONE Application Server 7 Release Notes”.
  5. ^ “Sun ONE Application Server 7 Debuts”. 28 October 2002.
  6. ^ “Java Live | July 30, 2002”. developer.java.sun.com. Archived from the original on 4 February 2003. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  7. ^ “Sun Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8 Release Notes”.
  8. ^ “Sun Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8 Update 1 Release Notes”. docs.oracle.com. Retrieved 14 April 2023.
  9. ^ Sharples, Rich (5 February 2005). “Sun Java System Application Server 8.1 2005Q1 Announced”. TheServersSide.com. Archived from the original on 19 April 2021.
  10. ^ “FishEye: Browsing glassfish/”. fisheye5.cenqua.com. Archived from the original on 3 February 2006. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  11. ^ “Developing and Building Project GlassFish with NetBeans”. netbeans.org. Archived from the original on 28 October 2005. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  12. ^ “Server startup”.
  13. ^ Ottinger, Joseph (31 January 2006). “Sun Java System Application Server PE 8.2 has been released”. TheServerSide.com. Archived from the original on 19 April 2021.
  14. ^ “What’s New in the 8.2 Release (Sun Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8.2 Release Notes)”.
  15. ^ Lynch, Regina (15 May 2006). “Sun Java System Application Server PE 9.0 has been released”. TheServerSide.com. Archived from the original on 19 September 2020.
  16. ^ “The Java Community Process(SM) Program – JSRs: Java Specification Requests – detail JSR# 289”. jcp.org.
  17. ^ “O’Reilly Media – Technology and Business Training”. www.oreillynet.com. Retrieved 2018-11-22.
  18. ^ “GlassFish v3 adds support for Tomcat-style valves”. Archived from the original on 2008-09-06. Retrieved 2008-09-07.
  19. ^ Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart (5 November 2008). “Saved Session State in GlassFish v3 Prelude”.
  20. ^ “GlassFish Server 3.1.2.2 Now Available”. blogs.oracle.com.
  21. ^ “Java EE 7 / GlassFish 4.0 Launch Coverage”. blogs.oracle.com.
  22. ^ “GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 Released!”. blogs.oracle.com.
  23. ^ Delabassee, David. “GlassFish 4.1.1 is now available!”. blogs.oracle.com.
  24. ^ Kalyandurga, Yamini. “GlassFish 4.1.2 Released”. blogs.oracle.com.
  25. ^ Delabassee, David. “Java EE 8 and GlassFish 5.0 Released!”. blogs.oracle.com.
  26. ^ a b Guindon, Christopher. “Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 is Released – The Eclipse Foundation”. www.eclipse.org.
  27. ^ “TCK Results”.
  28. ^ “GlassFish 7.0 Delivers Support for JDK 17 and Jakarta EE 10”. InfoQ. Retrieved 2023-01-10.
  29. ^ “Oracle GlassFish Server: Frequently Asked Questions” (PDF).
  30. ^ a b “Welcome – Oracle Community”. community.oracle.com.
  31. ^ “Java EE and GlassFish Server Roadmap Update”. blogs.oracle.com.
  32. ^ McAllister, Neil (2013-11-04). “Want a support contract for GlassFish 4.0? Tough luck, says Oracle”. The Register.
  33. ^ Lyons, Will. “Moving Forward with Eclipse GlassFish at Jakarta EE”. blogs.oracle.com.
  34. ^ “Jakarta EE 8 Status”. 18 March 2019.
  35. ^ “Contributors to eclipse-ee4j/glassfish”. GitHub. Retrieved 14 April 2023.
  36. ^ “OmniFish on Providing Support for Jakarta EE 10 and GlassFish 7”. InfoQ. Retrieved 14 April 2023.
  37. ^ “Eclipse GlassFish”. 31 March 2023. Retrieved 14 April 2023 – via GitHub.

Third Party Licenses

A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 applications.

Includes:

GlassFish Open Source Edition 3.1.2

Java EE 6 Code Samples

Java EE 6 API Documentation

Java EE 6 Tutorial

Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 web applications.

Includes:

GlassFish Open Source Edition Web Profile 3.1.2

Java EE 6 Code Samples

Java EE 6 API Documentation

Java EE 6 Tutorial

Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 applications.

Includes:

JDK 7 Update 11

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

Java EE 6 Code Samples

Java EE 6 API Documentation

Java EE 6 Tutorial

Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 applications.

Includes:

JDK 6 Update 38

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

Java EE 6 Code Samples

Java EE 6 API Documentation

Java EE 6 Tutorial

Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 web applications.

Includes:

JDK 7 Update 11

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

Java EE 6 Code Samples

Java EE 6 API Documentation

Java EE 6 Tutorial

Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

A free integrated development kit used to build, test, and deploy Java EE 6 web applications.

Includes:

JDK 6 Update 38

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 3.1.2

Java EE 6 Code Samples

Java EE 6 API Documentation

Java EE 6 Tutorial

Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform

Note: The technologies contained in the SDKs are based on Java Specification Requests (JSRs) listed on the Java EE 6 Standards page.

Support: Develop and deploy efficiently with Oracle GlassFish Server with advanced monitoring features. Oracle offers flexible pricing to suit your needs. » Purchase.

The Java EE Tutorial, Java EE 6 Samples, Java API Documentation, and Your First Cup: An Introduction to the Java EE Platform are available via Oracle GlassFish Server Update Center .

The Java EE 6 SDK is based on GlassFish Server Open Source Edition, and for those interested in exploring the details of the Java EE 6 Reference Implementation the source code is available. This includes schools, universities, companies, and individuals who want to examine the source code for personal interest or research & development.

The Java EE 6 Specifications contain all the technical specifications for Java EE 6 application developers and Jave EE 6 Server implementors.

⚠️This project is now part of the EE4JThis repository has been archived as all activities are now happening in the corresponding EclipseSee here for the overall EE4J transition status.

GlassFish Server

https://javaee.github.io/glassfish

GlassFish is the reference implementation of Java EE.

October 1, 2021 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.2 Available

We are pleased to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.2. This release provides implementations
of the Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform and Web Profile specifications. Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page. Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.2 implements the Jakarta EE 9.1 specification (Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform, Jakarta EE 9 Web Profile). GlassFish 6.2.2 brings GlassFish embedded back to live, and contains an import fix for a memory leak. A major behind the scenes accomplishment is that all active tests now use JUnit 5.

GlassFish 6.2.2 compiles with JDK 11 to JDK 17 and runs on JDK 11 to JDK 17. GlassFish 6.2.2 has been briefly tested with JDK 18-EA releases.

Note this release requires at least JDK 11.

How to Configure Tomcat Server in Netbeans IDE | Configure Tomcat in Netbeans
How to Configure Tomcat Server in Netbeans IDE | Configure Tomcat in Netbeans

Roadmap and end of Oracle commercial support[edit]

The commercially supported version of GlassFish was known as Oracle GlassFish Server,[29] formerly Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server, and previously Sun Java System Application Server (SJSAS) has a history, along with other iPlanet software, going back to Netscape Application Server. This includes code from other companies such as Oracle Corporation for TopLink Essentials. Ericsson’s SIP Servlet support is included, the opensource version of it is SailFish, developing towards JSR-289.[30] In 2010, the difference between the commercial and open source edition was already quite small.[30]

On 4 November 2013, Oracle announced the future roadmap for Java EE and Glassfish Server, with a 4.1 open-source edition planned and continuing open-sources updates to GlassFish but with an end to commercial Oracle support.[31][32] Commercial customers have instead been encouraged to transition to Oracle’s alternative product, Oracle WebLogic Server.

In response to Oracle’s announcement to end commercial support for GlassFish, a fork called Payara Server was created and released in October 2014. Payara Server is open source under the same licenses as GlassFish, but has optional commercial support.

Open-source GlassFish continued under Oracle till version 5.0 (the reference implementation for Java EE 8) after which the source code was donated to the Eclipse Foundation,[33] which released the technically identical but relicensed version 5.1.[26] At Eclipse, Payara is leading the GlassFish project, with support from Oracle and Red Hat.[2]

A GlassFish 5.2 release was planned as a Jakarta EE 8 compatible implementation, but was never released. Jakarta EE 8 is functionally identical to Java EE 8, but was created via the Eclipse Foundation Specification Process (EFSP).[34]

The GlassFish 7 development was sponsored to a large degree[35] by the Estonian company OmniFish, which also provides commercial support for GlassFish once again.[36][37]

May 25, 2021 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.1 Available

We are happy to announce the final release of Eclipse GlassFish 6.1. This release provides implementations
of the Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform and Web Profile specifications. Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page. Eclipse GlassFish 6.1 implements the Jakarta EE 9.1 specification (Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform, Jakarta EE 9 Web Profile).

Note this release requires JDK 11.

Create First Servlet Application in NetBeans | Configure Tomcat Server | Web Application in Netbeans
Create First Servlet Application in NetBeans | Configure Tomcat Server | Web Application in Netbeans

Cài đặt glassfish server

Dowload glassfish

Bạn có thể download glassfish từ: https://glassfish.java.net/download.html

H2.1 – Download và cài đặt glassfish server.

Sau khi tải về bạn giải nén file ‘glassfish-4.1.zip’ vào nơi cần thiết.

Chạy glassfish

Từ thư mục cài đặt glassfish ta gõ lệnh sau để chạy server ./bin/asadmin startdomainSau khi server chạy xong ta vào màn hình quản trị bằng link sau: http://localhost:4848login với user là admin / password để trống hoặc ‘changeit’.

H2.2 – Màn hình login glassfish.

Sau khi login thành công bạn sẽ vào trang quản trị của glassfish server.

H2.3 – Màn hình glassfish admin.

Stop và start glassfish

Start glassfish : asadmin startdomain Stop glassfish : asadmin stopdomain

Deploy và undeploy ứng dụng

Deploy ứng dụng : asadmin deploy [tên file ứng dụng] Undeploy ứng dụng: asadmin undeploy [tên ứng dụng]Ngoài ra chúng ta có thể dùng một số IDE như Eclipse, Netbeans để chạy và quản lý ứng dụng với server glassfish.

July 29, 2023 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.7 Available

Another month, another new version of Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.7 released today.

This release prepares GlassFish for the upcoming JDK 21; it compiles and passes all internal tests using OpenJDK 21ea33. Several TCKs passed on JDK 21 as well, but the TCK as a whole is not JDK 21 compatible yet.

This release also adds support for MicroProfile JWT 2.1, and has many components updated to their latest version. Several issues have again been fixed in the Admin Console. An important bug regarding Enterprise Beans method generation has been fixed, as has a remote access issue for Enterprise Beans.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

ERROR build-impl.xml:1030: the module has not been deployed. APACHE Tomcat 9- NetBeans 19 - sdk 17
ERROR build-impl.xml:1030: the module has not been deployed. APACHE Tomcat 9- NetBeans 19 – sdk 17

January 30, 2024 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.12 Available

We are very happy to bring you Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.12.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

This release we focused on finding and fixing the root cause of several “strange” WebSocket related bugs that we witnessed in the past. We also did a similar thing related to several issues with running apps on the default context root, especially where after authentication redirects happened to another URL.

Furthermore we looked into problems with authentication and SSO in a cluster and did some initial fixes. Handling and processing of logging was looked at once again, something we have been improving a lot step by step through various iterations of releases.

Finally but not least a nasty ConcurrentModificationException was fixed, and a memory leak (via HK2) was solved.

Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page.

Roadmap and end of Oracle commercial support[edit]

The commercially supported version of GlassFish was known as Oracle GlassFish Server,[29] formerly Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server, and previously Sun Java System Application Server (SJSAS) has a history, along with other iPlanet software, going back to Netscape Application Server. This includes code from other companies such as Oracle Corporation for TopLink Essentials. Ericsson’s SIP Servlet support is included, the opensource version of it is SailFish, developing towards JSR-289.[30] In 2010, the difference between the commercial and open source edition was already quite small.[30]

On 4 November 2013, Oracle announced the future roadmap for Java EE and Glassfish Server, with a 4.1 open-source edition planned and continuing open-sources updates to GlassFish but with an end to commercial Oracle support.[31][32] Commercial customers have instead been encouraged to transition to Oracle’s alternative product, Oracle WebLogic Server.

In response to Oracle’s announcement to end commercial support for GlassFish, a fork called Payara Server was created and released in October 2014. Payara Server is open source under the same licenses as GlassFish, but has optional commercial support.

Open-source GlassFish continued under Oracle till version 5.0 (the reference implementation for Java EE 8) after which the source code was donated to the Eclipse Foundation,[33] which released the technically identical but relicensed version 5.1.[26] At Eclipse, Payara is leading the GlassFish project, with support from Oracle and Red Hat.[2]

A GlassFish 5.2 release was planned as a Jakarta EE 8 compatible implementation, but was never released. Jakarta EE 8 is functionally identical to Java EE 8, but was created via the Eclipse Foundation Specification Process (EFSP).[34]

The GlassFish 7 development was sponsored to a large degree[35] by the Estonian company OmniFish, which also provides commercial support for GlassFish once again.[36][37]

Servlet Tutorial in Netbeans - basic
Servlet Tutorial in Netbeans – basic

Releases[edit]

October 2003 – Sun Microsystems released Sun ONE Application Server 7 [4][5] that supports the J2EE 1.3 specification. It is based on the iPlanet Web Server and the J2EE reference implementation[6] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

March 2004 – Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8[7] that supports the J2EE 1.4 specification. In June 2004 update 1 is released.[8] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

8 February 2005 – Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8.1 that supports the J2EE 1.4 specification. This version introduced a major update to web services security (a precursor to the later JASPIC and Jakarta Authentication), Admin Console GUI enhancements, JavaServer Faces 1.1 Support (at this point not yet part of J2EE), performance enhancements, and support for Java SE 5.0.[9] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

6 June 2005 – Sun Microsystems launched the GlassFish project by publishing the vetted source of Sun Java System Application Server.[10][11] Builds of this early version identity themselves in the log as “sun-appserver-pe9.0”.[12]

31 January 2006 – Sun Microsystems released Sun Java System Application Server 8.2.[13] This version introduced bundling of the Derby database and Fast Infoset for web services.[14] A basic version is free to download, but not open source.

4 May 2006 – Project GlassFish released the 1.0 version (a.k.a. Sun Java System Application Server 9.0) that supports the Java EE 5 specification.

15 May 2006 – Sun Java System Application Server 9.0, derived from GlassFish 1.0, is released.[15]

8 May 2007 – Project SailFin was announced at JavaOne as a sub-project under Project GlassFish. Project SailFin aims to add Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) servlet functionality to GlassFish.[16]

17 September 2007 – the GlassFish community released version 2.0 (a.k.a. Sun Java System Application Server 9.1) with full enterprise clustering capabilities, Microsoft-interoperable Web Services.

21 January 2009 – Sun Microsystems and the community released version GlassFish 2.1 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 2.1) which serves as the basis for the Sailfin 1.0 (a.k.a. Sun Communication Application Server 1.0).

28 October 2009 – SailFin 2.0 (a.k.a. Sun Communication Application Server 2.0) was released which leverages GlassFish 2.1.1 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 2.1.1) and adds a number of features including high availability, rolling upgrade, flexible network topology, better overload protection, Diameter support, improved diagnosability, Java based DCR files for the load balancer, and more.

10 December 2009 – GlassFish 3.0 (a.k.a. Sun GlassFish Enterprise Server 3.0) was released. Being the Java EE reference implementation, this was the first application server to completely implement Java EE 6 JSR 316. JSR 316 was however approved with reservations.[17] In this version GlassFish adds new features to ease migration from Tomcat to GlassFish.[18] The other main new features are around modularity (GlassFish v3 Prelude already shipped with an Apache Felix OSGi runtime), startup time (a few seconds), deploy-on-change (provided by NetBeans and Eclipse plugins), and session preservation across redeployments.[19]

25 March 2010 – Soon after the acquisition of Sun Microsystems, Oracle issued a Roadmap for versions 3.0.1, 3.1, 3.2 and 4.0 with themes revolving around clustering, virtualization and integration with Coherence and other Oracle technologies. The open source community remains otherwise unaffected.

28 February 2011 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1. This version introduced support for ssh-based provisioning, centralized admin, clustering and load-balancing. It maintains its support for both the Web Profile and full Java EE 6 Platform specifications.

28 July 2011 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.1. This is fix release for GlassFish 3.1 with multiple component updates (Weld, Mojarra, Jersey, EclipseLink, …), JDK 7 support, AIX support and more.

29 February 2012 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.2. This release includes bug fixes and new features including administration console enhancements, transaction recovery from a database and new thread pool properties.

17 July 2012 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 3.1.2.2. This is a “micro” release to address some exceptional issues in the product.[20]

12 June 2013 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.0. This major release brings Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 7 support.[21]

9 September 2014 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1. This release includes many bug fixes (over a thousand) and the latest MR releases of CDI and WebSockets.[22]

7 October 2015 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1.1. This release includes many bug fixes and security fixes as well as updates to many underlying components.[23]

31 March 2017 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 4.1.2. This release includes bug fixes.[24]

21 September 2017 – Oracle Corporation released GlassFish 5.0. This release includes Java EE 8 Open Source Reference Implementation and that the Java EE 8 umbrella specification and all the underlying specifications (JAX-RS 2.1, Servlet 4.0, CDI 2.0, JSON-B 1.0, Bean Validation 2.0, etc.) are finalized and approved.[25]

29 January 2019 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 5.1. This release is technically identical to Oracle’s GlassFish 5.0 but is fully build from the source code that Oracle transferred to the Eclipse Foundation and which was subsequently relicensed to EPL. Like GlassFish 5.0, 5.1 is Java EE 8 certified, but does not have any RI status. The main goal of this release is to prove that all source code has been transferred and can indeed be built into a fully compliant product.[26]

31 December 2020 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.0.0. This version is functionally largely identical to GlassFish 5.1 but implements Jakarta EE 9.[27] Jakarta EE 9 is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 8 (which is functionally identical to Java EE 8) but has its package and various constants changed from javax.* to jakarta.*

5 May 2021 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.1.0. This version is functionally identical to GlassFish 6.0.0 but implements Jakarta EE 9.1. Jakarta EE 9.1 is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 9 (which is functionally identical to Jakarta EE 8 and Java EE 8) but has support for JDK 11. This release requires JDK 11.

28 August 2021 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 6.2.1. This version has improved support for JDK 17 and includes a new component Eclipse Exousia, the standalone Jakarta Authorization implementation. GlassFish 6.2.1 compiles with JDK 11 to JDK 17

14 December 2022 – the Eclipse Foundation released GlassFish 7.0.0. This is the first version containing larger refactoring and code cleanup, large amount of bugfixes and also new features.[28] Implements new Jakarta Concurrency specification, and supports JDK 11 but recommends usage of JDK17.

September 19, 2022 – Eclipse GlassFish 7.0.0-M8 certified as Jakarta EE 10 compatible

We are pleased to announce that with the milestone release 7.0.0-M8, Eclipse GlassFish is officially certified as a Jakarta EE 10 compatible implementation.

You can download both milestone releases from the Eclipse Foundation Download portal to try out what’s new in Jakarta EE 10.

Creating A Simple JSP Web Application in NetBeans
Creating A Simple JSP Web Application in NetBeans

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Release 7.0.11”. 4 December 2023. Retrieved 19 December 2023.
  2. ^ a b “Eclipse GlassFish”. projects.eclipse.org.
  3. ^ Beaton, Wayne (10 May 2018). “Eclipse GlassFish”. projects.eclipse.org.
  4. ^ “Sun ONE Application Server 7 Release Notes”.
  5. ^ “Sun ONE Application Server 7 Debuts”. 28 October 2002.
  6. ^ “Java Live | July 30, 2002”. developer.java.sun.com. Archived from the original on 4 February 2003. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  7. ^ “Sun Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8 Release Notes”.
  8. ^ “Sun Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8 Update 1 Release Notes”. docs.oracle.com. Retrieved 14 April 2023.
  9. ^ Sharples, Rich (5 February 2005). “Sun Java System Application Server 8.1 2005Q1 Announced”. TheServersSide.com. Archived from the original on 19 April 2021.
  10. ^ “FishEye: Browsing glassfish/”. fisheye5.cenqua.com. Archived from the original on 3 February 2006. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  11. ^ “Developing and Building Project GlassFish with NetBeans”. netbeans.org. Archived from the original on 28 October 2005. Retrieved 11 January 2022.
  12. ^ “Server startup”.
  13. ^ Ottinger, Joseph (31 January 2006). “Sun Java System Application Server PE 8.2 has been released”. TheServerSide.com. Archived from the original on 19 April 2021.
  14. ^ “What’s New in the 8.2 Release (Sun Java System Application Server Platform Edition 8.2 Release Notes)”.
  15. ^ Lynch, Regina (15 May 2006). “Sun Java System Application Server PE 9.0 has been released”. TheServerSide.com. Archived from the original on 19 September 2020.
  16. ^ “The Java Community Process(SM) Program – JSRs: Java Specification Requests – detail JSR# 289”. jcp.org.
  17. ^ “O’Reilly Media – Technology and Business Training”. www.oreillynet.com. Retrieved 2018-11-22.
  18. ^ “GlassFish v3 adds support for Tomcat-style valves”. Archived from the original on 2008-09-06. Retrieved 2008-09-07.
  19. ^ Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart (5 November 2008). “Saved Session State in GlassFish v3 Prelude”.
  20. ^ “GlassFish Server 3.1.2.2 Now Available”. blogs.oracle.com.
  21. ^ “Java EE 7 / GlassFish 4.0 Launch Coverage”. blogs.oracle.com.
  22. ^ “GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 4.1 Released!”. blogs.oracle.com.
  23. ^ Delabassee, David. “GlassFish 4.1.1 is now available!”. blogs.oracle.com.
  24. ^ Kalyandurga, Yamini. “GlassFish 4.1.2 Released”. blogs.oracle.com.
  25. ^ Delabassee, David. “Java EE 8 and GlassFish 5.0 Released!”. blogs.oracle.com.
  26. ^ a b Guindon, Christopher. “Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 is Released – The Eclipse Foundation”. www.eclipse.org.
  27. ^ “TCK Results”.
  28. ^ “GlassFish 7.0 Delivers Support for JDK 17 and Jakarta EE 10”. InfoQ. Retrieved 2023-01-10.
  29. ^ “Oracle GlassFish Server: Frequently Asked Questions” (PDF).
  30. ^ a b “Welcome – Oracle Community”. community.oracle.com.
  31. ^ “Java EE and GlassFish Server Roadmap Update”. blogs.oracle.com.
  32. ^ McAllister, Neil (2013-11-04). “Want a support contract for GlassFish 4.0? Tough luck, says Oracle”. The Register.
  33. ^ Lyons, Will. “Moving Forward with Eclipse GlassFish at Jakarta EE”. blogs.oracle.com.
  34. ^ “Jakarta EE 8 Status”. 18 March 2019.
  35. ^ “Contributors to eclipse-ee4j/glassfish”. GitHub. Retrieved 14 April 2023.
  36. ^ “OmniFish on Providing Support for Jakarta EE 10 and GlassFish 7”. InfoQ. Retrieved 14 April 2023.
  37. ^ “Eclipse GlassFish”. 31 March 2023. Retrieved 14 April 2023 – via GitHub.

GlassFish is an open-source, fully Java EE-compliant application server (including support for Java Servlets, JSPs, EJBs, JPA, JMS and more). It provides a platform for developing, deploying, and managing Java-based enterprise applications. It is developed by the Eclipse Foundation and is based on the Java EE reference implementation.

GlassFish has gained popularity as an open-source alternative to other Java EE application servers. It is widely used for developing and deploying Java EE applications in various enterprise environments.

GlassFish offers a range of key features that facilitate the development, deployment, and management of Java applications. Some of the notable features include:

GlassFish includes a web-based administration console that provides a graphical user interface for monitoring and managing the server. The console displays real-time information about server health, resource usage, and application statistics. It allows administrators to monitor thread pools, JDBC connection pools, JMS resources, and other server resources.

From the built-in monitoring capabilities, you can understand the usage of the GlassFish application server and identify bottlenecks within the server. However, many enterprise deploying GlassFish are looking for more comprehensive end-to-end monitoring capabilities. Key requirements include:

Only with such comprehensive insight can IT admins answer today’s toughest question “Why is my application slow?”.

Since GlassFish runs on a Java virtual machine, it is essential to monitor the JVM and its internals in-depth. Performance of the JVM garbage collector, usage of the JVM’s heap memory, threads running in the JVM are some of the key metrics to collect. GlassFish exposes key metrics about the application server via Java Management Extensions interfaces so monitoring tools can track the application server’s performance. GlassFish application server logs are also a great source of metrics. Access logging must be turned on for this. To get greater insights into applications hosted on GlassFish, distributed transaction tracing can be implemented using tools like eG Enterprise.

Learn more about the converged application and infrastructure monitoring approach that eG Enterprise uses: https://www.eginnovations.com/converged-application-infrastructure-monitoring

1. Oracle GlassFish Server 3.0.1 Release Notes

What’s New in the Oracle GlassFish Server 3.0.1 Release?

Support for Extending GlassFish Server

Support for Scripting Languages

Web Services Interoperability Technologies (WSIT) Support

Enhancements to the appclient Utility

Move of HTTP Service Settings to Network Service

Changes Related to Administrator Authentication

Changes Related to the asadmin Utility

Changes Related to File Layout

Changes Related to Ant Tasks and the asant Utility

Changes Related to domain.xml Validation

Changes Related to Applications

Applications and Generated Directory Layout

domain.xml application Element

Application Client deploy –retrieve and get-client-stubs Commands

Hardware and Software Requirements

Path Settings for the JDK Software

Supported JDBC Drivers and Databases

IPS Online Upgrade No Longer Available (19910200)

Expired Root CA for CN=GTE CyberTrust Root 5, OU=GTE CyberTrust Solutions, Inc. (17405426)

To Delete the GTE CyberTrust Root 5 Certificate From the Truststore

[OWSM] Interop Metro-WLS:NPE WSSECURTIYTOKEN NULL for WSSE:SECURITYTOKENREFERENCE (Issue 9716247)

[JDK_Issue] SSLHandshakeException when using JDK1.6.0_20 (Issue 12041)

[JDK_Issue] Performance degradation caused by invoking setSoLinger or setReuseAddress (Issue 7109)

[JDK_Issue] IO exception: invalid argument during longevity test (Issue 7529)

[JDK_Issue] Richaccess: java.io.IOException: Invalid argument from doSelect (Issue 8573)

GlassFish Server 3.0.1 on HP-UX when using jdk 1.6.0.07 (Issue 12206)

GF b22 failed to startup with JRockit jrmc-4.0.0-1.6.0 (Issue 12265)

File permissions on domain /applications directory can cause NullProcessException (Issue 6545)

Windows installation log file is not readable (Issue 4881)

Uninstallation fails on Windows 7 because of missing JDK error (Issue 12093)

Access to statistics for new virtual servers requires server restart (Issues 6238 and 6422)

[Open Installer] Option -l to relocate log files ignored on Windows (Issue 10693)

Issues occur with ZIP distribution if UAC enabled on Windows Vista (Issue 10755)

Null pointer exception thrown from com.sun.xml.wss.NonceManager.getInstance (Issue 11138)

[Open Installer] Start menus not displayed and then empty on Windows Vista and Windows 2008 (Issue 5087)

When specj application is deployed, asadmin get –monitor=true “server.*” results in I/O error (Issue 11163)

Standalone Update Tool fails with segmentation fault on Solaris (Issue 11222)

Ruby applications deployed on context root don’t work with Admin Console (Issue 10854)

Java EE 6 Managed Bean support not available in app clients launched using Java Web Start (Issue 11257)

Warning messages when invoking appclient script on Mac OS X with Apple Java implementation (Issue 8644)

Launching an app client can give ClassNotFound error for the client’s main class (Issue 11181)

Change to log file location requires server restart to take effect (Issue 11142)

Unable to open installation log files using links on the Summary screen on Linux and Mac OS (Issue 6621)

updatetool command does not work if you reinstall into the same install directory on Windows (Issue 8233)

[Update Center] Non-user directory access fails (Update Center Issue 1583)

Inline help and CLI man page list incorrect servlet version 2.4 in X-Powered-By (Issue 11011)

[Embedded] Deployment of application containing activation-1.1.jar fails when using uber-jar (Issue 11149)

create-service fails to create service without AS_ADMIN_USER in passwordfile on Solaris (Issue 11119)

[Monitoring] Extra monitoring view for connector-connection-pools not available (Issue 11256)

[EclipseLink] Issues with ElementCollections of embeddables (EclipseLink Issue 296606)

Virtual server started twice (Issue 11195)

Problems debugging JPA (Issue 11274)

EJB interop for remote EJBs broken when target EJB is on the same host (Issue 11152)

Cannot send JMS messages between systems (Issue 11254)

Windows system menu is empty (Issue 11239)

Embedded ACC overly strict on current thread context class loader (Issue 11427)

EJB Timer Service config issue for MySQL (Issue 11428)

deploy subcommand fails against secure server (Issue 11439)

Expired certificate in GlassFish Server truststore (Issue 6852796)

GlassFish V3 should allow multiple applications with the same context root (7002834)

Install Directory of application server not known. Specify either the installDir attribute or the asinstall.dir property (14837)

Disabling Trace Request on GlassFish 3.0.1 (12650799)

Unsupported Options in asadmin Commands

No Support for Client VM on Windows AMD64

GlassFish Server Documentation Set

Features Available Only in the Full Platform Profile

How to Report Problems and Provide Feedback

Third-Party Web Site References

This section lists the requirements that must be met before installing the Oracle GlassFish Server 3.0.1 product.

Complete information about supported operating environments and hardware for GlassFish Server is available in the Oracle GlassFish Server Certification Matrix.

System virtualization is a technology that enables multiple operating system (OS) instances to execute independently on shared hardware. Functionally, software deployed to an OS hosted in a virtualized environment is generally unaware that the underlying platform has been virtualized. Oracle performs testing of its Oracle Java System products on select system virtualization and OS combinations to help validate that the Oracle Java System products continue to function on properly sized and configured virtualized environments as they do on non-virtualized systems.

For information about Oracle support for Oracle Java System products in virtualized environments, see the Oracle GlassFish Server Virtualization Support matrix.

Your temporary directory must have enough free space for the installation of the following software:

Oracle GlassFish Server: 35 MB minimum

Java SDK: 250 MB minimum

You must have seven unused ports available. The installation program automatically detects ports that are in use and suggests currently unused ports for the default settings. The initial default port assignments are listed in the following table. If these default port numbers are in use, the installation program assigns a randomly selected port number from the dynamic port range. The selected port number might not be the next available port number.

Table 1-2 Default Port Assignments for GlassFish Server 3.0.1

If you are using the Solaris 10 operating system, you must apply the appropriate patch for your platform as listed in Table 1-3.

Table 1-3 GlassFish Server 3.0.1 Solaris Patch Requirements

You must also ensure that the Oracle recommended patch cluster is applied. These patches and the patch cluster are available from the SunSolve program web site.

To obtain a patch, click the PatchFinder link and then use the Patch ID field to find the patch.

To obtain a patch cluster, click the Patch Cluster and Patch Bundle Downloads link in the Downloads section, and then the link for recommended patch clusters.

Installation of Oracle GlassFish Server 3.0.1 requires JDK release 6.

The minimum (and certified) version of the JDK software that is required for GlassFish Server depends on the operating system:

For all supported operating systems using the Java JDK, the minimum required version is 1.6.0_20.

For all supported operating systems using the JRockit JDK, the minimum required version is 1.6.0_17.

Complete information about supported JDK versions for GlassFish Server is available in the Oracle GlassFish Server Certification Matrix.

The following binary files that are used with GlassFish Server must come from the JDK software, not the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) software:

java

keytool

To meet this requirement, ensure that the bin directory of the JDK software precedes the bin directory of the JRE software in your path.

All supported configurations of the Oracle GlassFish Server 3.0.1 must contain at least one combination of database and driver from the Oracle GlassFish Server Certification Matrix. In addition, GlassFish Server is designed to support connectivity through Java DataBase Connectivity (JDBC) technology to any additional database management system (DBMS) with a corresponding driver that supports the JDBC API (JDBC driver).

The Oracle GlassFish Server Certification Matrix lists supported browsers and versions.

Oracle GlassFish Server 3.0.1 supports mod_jk 1.2.x, with a minimum of version 1.2.26.

: any of several small Old World fishes constituting a genus Ambassis of the family Centropomidae, having a transparent body that allows the bones and viscera to be clearly visible, and being often kept in the tropical aquarium

: any of several small Old World fishes constituting a genus Ambassis of the family Centropomidae, having a transparent body that allows the bones and viscera to be clearly visible, and being often kept in the tropical aquarium

: any of several small Old World fishes constituting a genus Ambassis of the family Centropomidae, having a transparent body that allows the bones and viscera to be clearly visible, and being often kept in the tropical aquarium

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: any of several small Old World fishes constituting a genus Ambassis of the family Centropomidae, having a transparent body that allows the bones and viscera to be clearly visible, and being often kept in the tropical aquarium

: any of several small Old World fishes constituting a genus Ambassis of the family Centropomidae, having a transparent body that allows the bones and viscera to be clearly visible, and being often kept in the tropical aquarium

: any of several small Old World fishes constituting a genus Ambassis of the family Centropomidae, having a transparent body that allows the bones and viscera to be clearly visible, and being often kept in the tropical aquarium

Love words?

You must — there are over 200,000 words in our free online dictionary, but you are looking for one that’s only in the

Merriam-Webster Unabridged

Dictionary.


Start your free trial today

and get unlimited access to America’s largest dictionary, with:

  • More than 250,000 words that aren’t in our free dictionary
  • Expanded definitions, etymologies, and usage notes
  • Advanced search features
  • Ad free!

About

GlassFish is the Open Source Java EE Reference Implementation; as such, we welcome external contributions. Make sure to read our Pull Request acceptance workflow.

Latest News

Oracle GlassFish Server is the world’s first implementation of the Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 6 specification. Built using the GlassFish Server Open Source Edition, Oracle GlassFish Server delivers a flexible, lightweight, and production-ready Java EE 6 application server.

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition is an open source application server built within the GlassFish community. Oracle GlassFish Server is based on GlassFish Server Open Source Edition. GlassFish Server users benefit from a vibrant community that offers self-support, contributes code and product features, product ideas and feedback, bug reports, and more. Useful community resources are outlined below.

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE) 6 is the industry standard for enterprise Java computing. Utilize the new, lightweight Java EE 6 Web Profile to create next-generation web applications, and the full power of the Java EE 6 platform for enterprise applications. Developers will benefit from productivity improvements with more annotations, more POJOs, simplified packaging, and less XML configuration.

GlassFish

Original author(s) Sun Microsystems
Developer(s) Eclipse Foundation
Initial release 6 June 2005
Stable release

7.0.11[1] / 4 December 2023

Repository https://github.com/eclipse-ee4j/glassfish
Written in Java
Operating system Cross-platform
Platform Java
Available in English
Type Application server
License Eclipse Public License or GPL+Classpath exception
Website glassfish

GlassFish is an open-source Jakarta EE platform application server project started by Sun Microsystems, then sponsored by Oracle Corporation, and now living at the Eclipse Foundation and supported by OmniFish, Fujitsu and Payara.[2] The supported version under Oracle was called Oracle GlassFish Server. GlassFish is free software and was initially dual-licensed under two free software licences: the Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL) and the GNU General Public License (GPL) with the Classpath exception. After having been transferred to Eclipse, GlassFish remained dual-licensed, but the CDDL license was replaced by the Eclipse Public License (EPL).[3]

How to fix Netbean Build fail error JavaFx | SD Official Global
How to fix Netbean Build fail error JavaFx | SD Official Global

August 28, 2021 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.1 Available

We are happy to announce the release of Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.1. This release provides implementations
of the Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform and Web Profile specifications. Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page. Eclipse GlassFish 6.2.1 implements the Jakarta EE 9.1 specification (Jakarta EE 9.1 Platform, Jakarta EE 9 Web Profile). GlassFish 6.2.1 now has much improved support for JDK 17, and includes new component Eclipse Exousia, the standalone Jakarta Authorization implementation. GlassFish 6.2.1 compiles with JDK 11 to JDK 17.

Note this release requires at least JDK 11.

Kết luận

Glassfish server là một trong những server có đầy đủ các chức năng để chạy các ứng dụng Java web, Java EE. Chúng ta sử dụng Glassfish server cho những ứng dụng lớn như ngân hàng, tài chính có nhiều thành viên và đòi hỏi độ bảo mật cao. Đối với những nhà lập trình, sử dụng Glassfish server nên tích hợp vào những IDE như eclipse, netbeans để thao tác nhanh hơn và nâng cao hiệu quả công việc.

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xyz

Overview of GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5.0 Application Deployment

DRAFT

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GlassFish Server Open Source Edition 5.0 provides an environment for developing and deploying Java applications and web services. GlassFish Server applications include Java Platform, Enterprise Edition (Java EE platform) standard features as well as features specific to GlassFish Server. This guide explains the tools and processes used for deploying applications and modules in the GlassFish Server environment. Only GlassFish Server features are described in detail in this document.

The following topics are addressed here:

Information and instructions on deploying from the command line are provided in this document. Information and instructions for accomplishing the deployment tasks by using the Administration Console are contained in the Administration Console online help.

Assembly, also known as packaging, is the process of combining discrete components of an application or module into a single unit that can be installed on an application server. The GlassFish Server assembly process conforms to the customary Java EE specifications. The only difference is that when you assemble applications or modules in GlassFish Server, you can include optional GlassFish Server deployment descriptors that enhance functionality.

Deployment is the process of installing an application or module on GlassFish Server, optionally specifying location-specific information, such as a list of local users that can access the application, or the name of the local database. GlassFish Server deployment tools expand the archive file into an open directory structure that is ready for users. GlassFish Server deployment tools are described in About Deployment Tools.

The following topics are addressed here:

Various Java EE module types, such as connector module, web module, EJB module, application client module, can be deployed in the following ways:

Archive Deployment. Deploys the application as an archive file. For instructions, see To Deploy an Application or Module.

Dynamic Reloading. Redeploys the application by creating or modifying
a special

.reload

file in the applications repository. For
instructions, see To Reload
Changes to Applications or Modules Dynamically.

Automatic Deployment. Deploys the application archive that is placed in the autodeployment directory. For instructions, see To Deploy an Application or Module Automatically.

Directory Deployment. Deploys the application in a directory format. For instructions, see To Deploy an Application or Module in a Directory Format.

JSR 88 Deployment. A deployment mechanism implemented based on the JSR
88 standard from

jcp.org

. It delivers vendor neutral deployment
options. See JSR 88 Client and JSR 88 Naming.

A deployment plan, which deploys a portable archive along with a deployment plan containing GlassFish Server deployment descriptors, can apply to any of these deployment techniques. For instructions, see To Deploy an Application or Module by Using a Deployment Plan.

There are two work situations that require different safeguards and processes:

A development environment provides a loose set of tools and work spaces for a relatively small number of developers who are creating and testing applications and modules.

A production environment provides a stable, protected environment where applications are tuned to maximum efficiency for business use rather than for development.

Some deployment methods that are used effectively in a development environment should not be used in production. In addition, whenever a reload is done, the sessions that are in transit become invalid, which might not be a concern for development, but can be a serious matter in production. The client must restart the session, another negative in a production environment.

For production environments, any upgrade should be performed as a rolling upgrade, which upgrades applications and modules without interruption in service. For more information, see Upgrading Applications Without Loss of Availability in GlassFish Server Open Source Edition High Availability Administration Guide.

A deployment descriptor is an XML file that describes how a Java EE application or module should be deployed. Each deployment descriptor XML file has a corresponding Document Type Definition (DTD) file or schema (XSD) file, which defines the elements, data, and attributes that the deployment descriptor file can contain. The deployment descriptor directs a deployment tool to deploy a module or application with specific container options, and also describes specific configuration requirements that you must resolve.

Because the information in a deployment descriptor is declarative, it can be changed without requiring modifications to source code. During deployment, GlassFish Server reads the information in the deployment descriptor and deploys the application or module as directed.

The following types of deployment descriptors are associated with GlassFish Server:

Java EE Standard Descriptors. Java EE standard deployment descriptors
are described in the Java EE 8 specification. You can find the
specification at

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/

.
Information about the XML schemas that define Java EE standard
deployment descriptors is available at

http://xmlns.jcp.org/xml/ns/javaee/

.The Java EE 8 specification permits the use of alternate top-level standard deployment descriptors that reside outside of the application archive using the

alt-dd

mechanism (alternate module-level deployment
descriptors were permitted prior to Java EE 7). Alternate deployment
descriptors are described in the Java EE 7 specification. You can find
the specification at

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/tech/

. Alternate
deployment descriptors override the top-level deployment descriptors
packaged in an application archive. For example, for EAR files, an
alternate deployment descriptor overrides

application.xml

. For
standalone modules, an alternate deployment descriptor overrides the
top-level module descriptor, such as

web.xml

.

GlassFish Server Descriptors. GlassFish Server provides optional
deployment descriptors for configuring features that are specific to
GlassFish Server. For example, when you assemble an EJB module, you
annotate or create two GlassFish Server deployment descriptor files with
these names:

ejb-jar.xml

and

glassfish-ejb-jar.xml

. If the EJB
component is an entity bean with container-managed persistence (CMP),
you can also create a

.dbschema

file and a

sun-cmp-mapping.xml

file.
For complete descriptions of these files and their elements, see
GlassFish Server Deployment Descriptor Files
and Elements of the GlassFish Server
Deployment Descriptors.GlassFish Server also permits the use of alternate top-level GlassFish Server runtime deployment descriptors that reside outside of an application archive. Alternate GlassFish Server deployment descriptors override the top-level deployment descriptors packaged in the archive. For example, for EAR files, an alternate GlassFish Server deployment descriptor overrides

glassfish-application.xml

. For standalone
modules, an alternate GlassFish Server deployment descriptor overrides
the top-level module descriptor, such as

glassfish-web.xml

. The name
of the GlassFish Server alternate deployment descriptor file must begin
with

glassfish-

. Alternate deployment descriptors do not apply to

sun-*.xml

deployment descriptors.Unless otherwise stated, settings in the GlassFish Server deployment descriptors override corresponding settings in the Java EE standard descriptors and in the GlassFish Server configuration.

An annotation, also called metadata, enables a declarative style of programming. You can specify information within a class file by using annotations. When the application or module is deployed, the information can either be used or overridden by the deployment descriptor. GlassFish Server supports annotation according to the following specifications:

The following annotation and deployment descriptor combinations are supported:

Java EE applications or modules can be packaged with full Java EE
compliant standard and runtime deployment descriptors. If the standard
deployment descriptors have specified the

metadata-complete

attribute,
annotations in the application or module are ignored.

Java EE applications or modules can be fully annotated with metadata defined by the listed specifications. Annotation eliminates the need for Java EE standard deployment descriptors. In most cases, the GlassFish Server deployment descriptors are also not needed.

Java EE applications or modules can be partially annotated with some deployment information in standard deployment descriptors. In case of conflicts, deployment descriptor values supersede the annotated metadata, and a warning message is logged.

An application is a logical collection of one or more modules joined by application annotations or deployment descriptors. You assemble components into JAR, WAR, or RAR files, then combine these files and, optionally, deployment descriptors into an Enterprise archive (EAR) file which is deployed.

A module is a collection of one or more Java EE components that run in the same container type, such as a web container or EJB container. The module uses annotations or deployment descriptors of that container type. You can deploy a module alone or as part of an application.

The following topics are addressed here:

GlassFish Server supports the following types of modules:

Web Module. A web module, also known as a web application, is a
collection of servlets, EJBs, HTML pages, classes, and other resources
that you can bundle and deploy to several Java EE application servers. A
web application archive (WAR) file is the standard format for assembling
web applications. A WAR file can consist of the following items:
servlets, JavaServer Pages (JSP) files, JSP tag libraries, utility
classes, static pages, client-side applets, beans, bean classes,
enterprise bean classes, plus annotations or web deployment descriptors
(

web.xml

and

glassfish-web.xml

).

EJB Module. An EJB module is a deployable software unit that consists
of one or more enterprise beans, plus an EJB deployment descriptor. A
Java archive (JAR) file is the standard format for assembling enterprise
beans. An EJB JAR file contains the bean classes (home, remote, local,
and implementation), all of the utility classes, and annotations or
deployment descriptors (

ejb-jar.xml

and

glassfish-ejb-jar.xml

). If
the EJB component is a version 2.1 or earlier entity bean with container
managed persistence (CMP), you can also include a

.dbschema

file and a
CMP mapping descriptor (

sun-cmp-mapping.xml

).

Connector Module. A connector module, also known as a resource adapter
module, is a deployable software unit that provides a portable way for
EJB components to access foreign enterprise information system (EIS)
data. A connector module consists of all Java interfaces, classes, and
native libraries for implementing a resource module, plus a resource
deployment descriptor. A resource adapter archive (RAR) is the standard
format for assembling connector modules. Each GlassFish Server connector
has annotations or a deployment descriptor file (

ra.xml

).After deploying a J2EE connector module, you must configure it as described in Developing Connectors in GlassFish Server Open Source Edition Application Development Guide.

Application Client Module. An application client module is a
deployable software unit that consists of one or more classes, and
application client deployment descriptors (

application-client.xml

and

glassfish-application-client.xml

). An application client JAR file
applies to a GlassFish Server type of Java EE client. An application
client supports the standard Java EE Application Client specifications.

Lifecycle Module. A lifecycle module provides a means of running short-duration or long-duration Java-based tasks within the GlassFish Server environment. Lifecycle modules are not Java EE standard modules. See Developing Lifecycle Listeners in GlassFish Server Open Source Edition Application Development Guide for more information.

You can deploy web, EJB, and application client modules separately, outside of any application. Module-based deployment is appropriate when components need to be accessed by other modules, applications, or application clients. Module-based deployment allows shared access to a bean from a web, EJB, or application client component.

The following figure shows separately-deployed EJB, web, and application client modules.

If you assemble a large, shared library into every module that uses it, the result is a huge file that takes too long to register with the server. In addition, several versions of the same class could exist in different class loaders, which is a waste of resources. When Java EE applications and modules use shared framework classes (such as utility classes and libraries), the classes can be put in the path for the common class loader or an application-specific class loader rather than in an application or module.

To specify an application-specific library file during deployment, use
the

--libraries

option of the

deploy

or

redeploy

subcommand of the

asadmin

command. To add a library JAR file to the Common class loader
directory, the Java optional package directory, or the
application-specific class loader directory, use the

add-library

subcommand. You can then list the libraries with

list-libraries

and
remove the libraries with

remove-library

. For more information about
all these commands, see the GlassFish Server Open Source Edition
Reference Manual.

For more information about class loaders, see Class Loaders in GlassFish Server Open Source Edition Application Development Guide.

Note

According to the Java EE specification, section 8.1.1.2, “Dependencies,” you cannot package utility classes within an individually-deployed EJB module. Instead, you must package the EJB module and utility JAR within an application using the JAR Extension Mechanism Architecture.

Names of applications and individually-deployed modules must be unique
within a GlassFish Server domain. Modules within an application must
have unique names. In addition, for enterprise beans that use
container-managed persistence (CMP), the

.dbschema

file names must be
unique within an application.

You should use a hierarchical naming scheme for module file names, EAR
file names, module names as found in the

module-name

portion of the

ejb-jar.xml

files, and EJB names as found in the

ejb-name

portion of
the

ejb-jar.xml

files. This hierarchical naming scheme ensures that
name collisions do not occur. The benefits of this naming practice apply
not only to GlassFish Server, but to other Java EE application servers
as well.

The following topics are addressed here:

Starting in Java EE 6, the Java EE specification defines the portable

application-name

, which allows you to specify an application name in
the

application.xml

file. For example:



xyz

The Java EE specification also defines the portable

module-name

element in the module standard deployment descriptors.

GlassFish Server determines the application registration name according to the following order of precedence:

The name specified at deployment time in the Administration Console
or in the

--name

option of the

asadmin deploy

command is used.

If no name is specified at deployment time, the portable

application-name

or

module-name

in the Java EE deployment descriptor
is used.

If no name is specified at deployment time or in the deployment descriptors, the archive name, minus the file type suffix, is used.

Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) lookup names for EJB
components must also be unique. Establishing a consistent naming
convention can help. For example, appending the application name and the
module name to the EJB name is a way to guarantee unique names, such as,

jms/qConnPool

.

Application and module directory structures must follow the structure
outlined in the Java EE specification. During deployment, the
application or module is expanded from the archive file to an open
directory structure. The directories that hold the individual modules
are named with

_jar

,

_rar

, and

_war

suffixes.

If you deploy a directory instead of an EAR file, your directory structure must follow this same convention. For instructions on performing directory deployment, see To Deploy an Application or Module in a Directory Format.

There are two JSR 88 APIs that can be used to deploy applications in GlassFish Server.

If you are using the following JSR 88 API, there is no file name:


javax.enterprise.deploy.spi.DeploymentManager.distribute(Target[], InputStream, InputStream)

Because there is no file name, the name of the application is taken from
the

application-name

or

module-name

entry in the Java EE standard
deployment descriptor. If the

application-name

or

module-name

entry
is not present, GlassFish Server creates a temporary file name and uses
that name to deploy the application. Neither the Administration Console
nor the

asadmin

utility uses this API.

If you are using the following preferred JSR 88 API, the name is derived
from the

application-name

or

module-name

entry if present or the
first portion of the file name (without the

.war

or

.jar

extension):


javax.enterprise.deploy.spi.DeploymentManager.distribute(Target[], File, File)

For more information about JSR 88, see

http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=88

.

Application and module versioning allows multiple versions of the same
application to exist in a GlassFish Server domain, which simplifies
upgrade and rollback tasks. At most one version of an application or
module can be enabled on a server any given time. Versioning provides
extensions to tools for deploying, viewing, and managing multiple
versions of modules and applications, including the Administration
Console and deployment-related

asadmin

subcommands. Different versions
of the same module or application can have the same context root or JNDI
name. Use of versioning is optional.

The following topics are addressed here:

The version identifier is a suffix to the module or application name. It
is separated from the name by a colon (). It must begin with a letter
or number. It can contain alphanumeric characters plus underscore (),
dash (), and period () characters. The following examples show
valid version identifiers for the

foo

application:


foo:1 foo:BETA-2e foo:3.8 foo:patch39875

A module or application without a version identifier is called the untagged version. This version can coexist with other versions of the same module or application that have version identifiers.

In some deployment-related

asadmin

commands, you can use an asterisk
() as a wildcard character to specify a version expression, which
selects multiple version identifiers. Using the asterisk by itself after
the colon selects all versions of a module or application, including the
untagged version. The following table shows example version expressions
and the versions they select.

Version Expression Selected Versions

All versions of

All

All

All

The following table summarizes which

asadmin

subcommands are
identifier-aware or expression-aware. All expression-aware subcommands
are also identifier-aware.

Identifier-Aware Subcommands Expression-Aware Subcommands

The

create-application-ref

subcommand is expression-aware only if the

--enabled

option is set to

false

. Because the

--enabled

option is
set to

true

by default, the

create-application-ref

subcommand is
identifier-aware by default.

The

list-applications

and

list-application-refs

subcommands display
information about all deployed versions of a module or application. To
find out which version is enabled, use the

--long

option.

At most one version of a module or application can be enabled on a server instance. All other versions are disabled. Enabling one version automatically disables all others. You can disable all versions of a module or application, leaving none enabled.

The

--enabled

option of the

deploy

and

redeploy

subcommands is set
to

true

by default. Therefore, simply deploying or redeploying a
module or application with a new version identifier enables the new
version and disables all others. To deploy a new version in a disabled
state, set the

--enabled

option to

false

.

To enable a version that has been deployed previously, use the

enable

subcommand.

Module and application versioning in GlassFish Server is subject to the following restrictions and limitations:

Use of the

--name

option is mandatory for modules and applications
that use versioning. There is no automatic version identifier
generation.

GlassFish Server does not recognize any relationship between versions such as previous or later versions. All version relationships must be tracked manually.

There is no limit to the number of versions you can deploy except what is imposed by disk space limits.

A module or application in a directory should not be deployed twice
with a different version identifier. To redeploy a module or application
from a directory with a new version, you must use the

--force

option
of the

deploy

subcommand.

Database tables created or deleted as part of deployment and undeployment are global resources and cannot be qualified by an application version. Be very careful when using global resources among versions of the same application.

Web sessions are preserved during redeployment of a new version. However, preserving sessions among different versions of the same module or application is complex, because the key used for session variables is the same for the old and new versions.

Resources are created with reference to a resource-adapter’s module or application name. This means that an older version’s resources do not automatically refer to a newer version of the module or application. Therefore, you must explicitly create resources for a newer version of a module or application. GlassFish Server ignores duplicate exported global resources and lets deployment succeed.

OSGi already has its own versioning system. Therefore, when you deploy an OSGi bundle, GlassFish Server ignores any version information provided with the name but permits the deployment to succeed with warnings.

The deployment tools that are provided by GlassFish Server can be used by any user authorized as an administrator to deploy applications and modules into any GlassFish Server environment. However, effective application deployment requires planning and care. Only the developer knows exactly what is required by an application, so the developer is responsible for initial assembly and deployment.

Deployment Descriptor or Annotation Creation. The developer creates
the deployment descriptors or equivalent annotations using Java
standards and tools.Details of the GlassFish Server deployment descriptors are contained in GlassFish Server Deployment Descriptor Files and Elements of the GlassFish Server Deployment Descriptors. The GlassFish Server sample applications contain deployment descriptors that can be used as templates for developing deployment descriptors.

Assembly. The developer assembles the archive file(s) using Java
standards and tools, such as the

jar

command. The application or
module is packaged into a JAR, WAR, RAR, or EAR file. For guidelines on
naming, see Naming Standards.There are no GlassFish Server issues to consider.

Test Deployment. The developer performs a test deployment of the archive. For instructions, see To Deploy an Application or Module.

Archive Submission. The developer submits the verified archive to the administrator for deployment into a production environment. The developer includes instructions for any additional deployment tasks that the administrator must perform. For an example of such additional instructions, see Access to Shared Framework Classes.

Configuration. The administrator applies additional deployment specifics. Sometimes the developer has indicated additional deployment needs, such as specifying the production database. In this case, the administrator edits and reassembles the archive.

Production Deployment. The administrator deploys the archive to production. See To Deploy an Application or Module.

Troubleshooting. If deployment fails, the administrator returns the archive to the developer. The developer fixes the problem and resubmits the archive to the administrator. Sometimes the administrator resolves the problem, depending on what the problem is.

GlassFish Server provides tools for assembling and deploying a module or application.

The following topics are addressed here:

The GlassFish Server Administration Console is a browser-based utility
that features a graphical interface that includes extensive online help
for the administrative tasks. The format for starting the Administration
Console in a web browser is

http://`hostname

:`port. For example:


http://localhost:4848

Step-by-step instructions for using the Administration Console for deployment are provided in the Administration Console online help. You can display the help material for a page by clicking the Help button. The initial help page describes the functions and fields of the page itself. To find instructions for performing associated tasks, click a link in the See Also list.


asadminUtility

The GlassFish Server

asadmin

utility is a command-line tool that
invokes subcommands for identifying the operation or task that you want
to perform. You can run

asadmin

commands either from a command prompt
or from a script. The format for starting the

asadmin

utility on the
command line is as-install`/bin/asadmin` subcommand –option. For
example:


asadmin list-applications --type web

Application deployment commands are listed in
The

asadmin

Deployment
Subcommands. All GlassFish Server

asadmin

subcommands are documented
in the GlassFish Server Open Source Edition Reference
Manual.

For the most part, you can perform the same administrative tasks by
using either the graphical Administration Console or the

asadmin

command-line utility, however, there are exceptions. Procedures for
using the command-line utilities are provided in this guide and in the
command-line help pages, which are similar to man pages. You can display
the help material for a command by typing help followed by the
subcommand. For example:


asadmin help list-applications

For additional information on the

asadmin

utility, see
“Using the

asadmin

Utility” in GlassFish Server Open
Source Edition Administration Guide and the

asadmin

(1M) help page.

You can use the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment (IDE), or
another IDE, to assemble Java EE applications and modules. The NetBeans
IDE is included in the tools bundle of the Java EE Software Development
Kit (SDK). To download, see

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/downloads/index.html

.
For additional information, see

http://www.netbeans.org

.

In addition to the bundled NetBeans IDE, a plug-in for the Eclipse IDE extends GlassFish to the Eclipse community.

As specified from Java EE 8 specifications, the relevant specifications are the following:

Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 8 Specification

https://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=366

Java EE Application Deployment JSR 88 Specification

http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=88

Common Annotations for the Java Platform 1.6 Specification

http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=250

Java Servlet 3.0 Specification

http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=315

Enterprise JavaBeans 3.1 Specification

http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=318

Java EE Connector Architecture 1.6 Specification

http://jcp.org/en/jsr/detail?id=322

The following product documentation might be relevant to some aspects of application deployment:

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition Application Development Guide

GlassFish Server Open Source Edition Add-On Component Development Guide

GlassFish Server Administration Console online help

Previous Next Contents

DRAFT

Java EE 8 – GlassFish 5 Download

Newer versions of GlassFish are now available from Eclipse Foundation, Jakarta EE project. Eclipse GlassFish downloads may be found here

GlassFish Docker Images

See here for details on the GlassFish 4.1.2 and GlassFish 5 Docker Images

Java EE 8 RI

The reference implementation downloads for Java EE 8

Older GlassFish versions (archive)

  • Java EE 8 – GlassFish 5.0
  • Java EE 7 – GlassFish 4
  • Java EE 6 – GlassFish 3
  • Oracle GlassFish Server

    • See archive.

Eclipse GlassFish

Installing Apache Tomcat server and Configure it with Netbeans
Installing Apache Tomcat server and Configure it with Netbeans

December 31, 2020 – Eclipse GlassFish 6 Stable Release

We are pleased to announce the stable release of Eclipse GlassFish 6.0. This release provides implementations
of the Jakarta EE 9 Platform and Web Profile specifications. Download links are available from the GlassFish Download page. Eclipse GlassFish 6 implements the Jakarta EE 9 specification (Jakarta EE 9 Platform, Jakarta EE 9 Web Profile).

October 24, 2020 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.0 Release Candidate 1 is released

This is the first release candidate of Eclipse GlassFish 6.0 and is available for download.
This first Release Candidate is functionally complete and is the first version to pass the in progress Jakarta EE 9 Platform CTS and standalone TCKs for both Full Platform and Web Platform. Further development will be carried out before final release but no major functinal changes will be made.

June 23, 2020 – Eclipse GlassFish 6.0 Milestone 1 is released

This release contains new Jakarta EE 9 compatible APIs. This is an early alpha release of Eclipse GlassFish 6. See the download page to get your copy.

September 10, 2019 – Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 is certified compatible with Eclipse Jakarta EE 8

Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 was certified as part of the release of the Jakarta EE 8 specification. This certification was completed without requiring any changes to Eclipse GlassFish 5.1, released in January of this same year. Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 is compatible with both Jakarta EE 8 and also Java EE 8.

January 28, 2019 – Eclipse GlassFish 5.1 is released

See the
press release
and related blog posts
(here
and here).

September 28, 2017 – Introducing Eclipse Enterprise for Java

See the Jakarta EE home-page.

GlassFish

Original author(s) Sun Microsystems
Developer(s) Eclipse Foundation
Initial release 6 June 2005
Stable release

7.0.11[1] / 4 December 2023

Repository https://github.com/eclipse-ee4j/glassfish
Written in Java
Operating system Cross-platform
Platform Java
Available in English
Type Application server
License Eclipse Public License or GPL+Classpath exception
Website glassfish

GlassFish is an open-source Jakarta EE platform application server project started by Sun Microsystems, then sponsored by Oracle Corporation, and now living at the Eclipse Foundation and supported by OmniFish, Fujitsu and Payara.[2] The supported version under Oracle was called Oracle GlassFish Server. GlassFish is free software and was initially dual-licensed under two free software licences: the Common Development and Distribution License (CDDL) and the GNU General Public License (GPL) with the Classpath exception. After having been transferred to Eclipse, GlassFish remained dual-licensed, but the CDDL license was replaced by the Eclipse Public License (EPL).[3]

Overview[edit]

GlassFish is the Eclipse implementation of Jakarta EE (formerly the reference implementation from Oracle) and as such supports Jakarta REST, Jakarta CDI, Jakarta Security, Jakarta Persistence, Jakarta Transactions, Jakarta Servlet, Jakarta Faces, Jakarta Messaging, etc. This allows developers to create enterprise applications that are portable and scalable, and that integrate with legacy technologies. Optional components can also be installed for additional services.

Built on a modular kernel powered by OSGi, GlassFish runs straight on top of the Apache Felix implementation. It also runs with Equinox OSGi or Knopflerfish OSGi runtimes. HK2 abstracts the OSGi module system to provide components, which can also be viewed as services. Such services can be discovered and injected at runtime.

GlassFish is based on source code released by Sun and Oracle Corporation’s TopLink persistence system. It uses a derivative of Apache Tomcat as the servlet container for serving web content, with an added component called Grizzly which uses Java non-blocking I/O (NIO) for scalability and speed.

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