Chuyển tới nội dung
Home » Code Blocks C Project | 1 Getting The Code::Blocks Ide

Code Blocks C Project | 1 Getting The Code::Blocks Ide

How to create C projects in Code Blocks

Quick links

Compiling and executing C programs using command prompt has always been a nightmare to programmers. It is time taking process.

Once you got strong hold to compile and execute C programs using command line, it’s time to switch to IDE. However, I always recommend a beginner to use command prompt for sometime for compiling and executing C programs.

CodeBlocks is a powerful IDE for creating, compiling, executing and debugging C/C++ programs. In previous post, I explained installation and configuration of CodeBlocks. In this post we will move further and see how to create, compile and run a C program in CodeBlocks.

Modifying build options

Build targets have come up several times so far. Changing between the two default generated ones –

Debug

and

Release

– can simply be done through the drop-down list on the

Compiler Toolbar

. Each of these targets has the ability to be a different type (for example: static library; console application), contain a different set of source files, custom variables, different build flags (for example: debug symbols

-p

; size optimization

-Os

; link time optimization

-flto

), and several other options.

Open

Project->Properties…

to access the main properties of the active project,

HelloWorld

. Most of the settings on the first tab,

Project settings

, are rarely changed.

Title:

allows the name of the project to be changed. If

Platforms:

is changed to something other than its default

All

, Code:Blocks will only allow the project to build on the selected targets. This is useful if, for example, the source code contains Windows API, and would therefore be invalid anywhere but Windows (or any other operating system specific situations). The

Makefile:

options are used only if the project should use a makefile instead of Code::Blocks’ internal build system (see

Code::Blocks and Makefiles

for further details).

Adding a new build target

Switch to the

Build targets

tab. Click

Add

to create a new build target and name it

Release Small

. The highlight in the left hand column should automatically switch to the new target (if not, click on it to change the focus). As the default setting for

Type:

– “GUI application” – is incorrect for the

HelloWorld

program, change it to “Console application” via the drop-down list. The output filename

HelloWorld.exe

is fine except in that it will cause the executable to be output in the main directory. Add the path “bin\ReleaseSmall\” (Windows) or “bin/ReleaseSmall/” (Linux) in front of it to change the directory (it is a relative path from the root of the project). The

Execution working dir:

refers to where the program will be executed when

Run

or

Build and run

are selected. The default setting “.” is fine (it refers to the project’s directory). The

Objects output dir:

needs to be changed to “obj\ReleaseSmall\” (Windows) or “obj/ReleaseSmall/” (Linux) in order to be consistent with the remainder of the project. The

Build target files:

currently has nothing selected. This is a problem, as nothing will be compiled if this target is built. Check all the boxes.

The next step is to change the target’s settings. Click

Build options…

to access the settings. The first tab the comes up has a series of compiler flags accessible through check boxes. Select “Strip all symbols from binary” and “Optimize generated code for size”. The flags here contain many of the more common options, however, custom arguments may be passed. Switch to the

Other options

sub-tab and add the following switches.


-fno-rtti
-fno-exceptions
-ffunction-sections
-fdata-sections
-flto

Now switch to the

Linker settings

tab. The

Link libraries:

box provides a spot to add various libraries (for example,

wxmsw28u

for the Windows Unicode version of the

wxWidgets

monolithic dll). This program does not require any such libraries. The custom switches from the previous step require their link-time counterparts. Add


-flto
-Os
-Wl,--gc-sections
-shared-libgcc
-shared-libstdc++

to the

Other linker options:

tab. (For further details on what these switches do, see the GCC documentation on

optimization options

and

linker options

.)

Virtual Targets

Click

OK

to accept these changes and return to the previous dialog. Now that there are two release builds, it will take two separate runs of

Build

or

Build and run

to compile both. Fortunately, Code::Blocks provides the option to chain multiple builds together. Click

Virtual targets…

, then

Add

. Name the virtual target

Releases

and click

OK

. In the right-hand

Build targets contained

box, select both

Release

and

Release small

. Close out of this box and hit

OK

on the main window.

The virtual target

Releases

will now be available from the

Compiler Toolbar

; building this should result in the following output.


-------------- Build: Release in HelloWorld ---------------

Compiling: main.cpp
Compiling: hello.cpp
Linking console executable: bin\Release\HelloWorld.exe
Output size is 457.50 KB

-------------- Build: Release Small in HelloWorld ---------------

Compiling: main.cpp
Compiling: hello.cpp
Linking console executable: bin\ReleaseSmall\HelloWorld.exe
Output size is 8.00 KB

Process terminated with status 0 (0 minutes, 1 seconds)


0 errors, 0 warnings (0 minutes, 1 seconds)

This page is a guide to many of the beginning (and some intermediate) features of the creation and modification of a Code::Blocks project. If this is your first experience with Code::Blocks, here is a good starting point.

How to create C projects in Code Blocks
How to create C projects in Code Blocks

The project wizard

Launch the Project Wizard through

File->New->Project…

to start a new project. Here there are many pre-configured templates for various types of projects, including the option to create custom templates. Select

Console application

, as this is the most common for general purposes, an click

Go

.


Note: red text instead of black text below any of the icons signifies it is using a customized

wizard script

.

The console application wizard will appear next. Continue through the menus, selecting

C++

when prompted for a language. In the next screen, give the project a name and type or select a destination folder. As seen below, Code::Blocks will generate the remaining entries from these two.

Finally, the wizard will ask if this project should use the default compiler (normally GCC) and the two default builds:

Debug

and

Release

. All of these settings are fine. Press finish and the project will be generated. The main window will turn gray, but that is not a problem, the source file needs only to be opened. In the

Projects

tab of the

Management

pane on the left expand the folders and double click on the source file

main.cpp

to open it in the editor.

This file contains the following standard code.


main.cpp

#include 

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;
    return 0;
}

Modifying build options

Build targets have come up several times so far. Changing between the two default generated ones –

Debug

and

Release

– can simply be done through the drop-down list on the

Compiler Toolbar

. Each of these targets has the ability to be a different type (for example: static library; console application), contain a different set of source files, custom variables, different build flags (for example: debug symbols

-p

; size optimization

-Os

; link time optimization

-flto

), and several other options.

Open

Project->Properties…

to access the main properties of the active project,

HelloWorld

. Most of the settings on the first tab,

Project settings

, are rarely changed.

Title:

allows the name of the project to be changed. If

Platforms:

is changed to something other than its default

All

, Code:Blocks will only allow the project to build on the selected targets. This is useful if, for example, the source code contains Windows API, and would therefore be invalid anywhere but Windows (or any other operating system specific situations). The

Makefile:

options are used only if the project should use a makefile instead of Code::Blocks’ internal build system (see

Code::Blocks and Makefiles

for further details).

Adding a new build target

Switch to the

Build targets

tab. Click

Add

to create a new build target and name it

Release Small

. The highlight in the left hand column should automatically switch to the new target (if not, click on it to change the focus). As the default setting for

Type:

– “GUI application” – is incorrect for the

HelloWorld

program, change it to “Console application” via the drop-down list. The output filename

HelloWorld.exe

is fine except in that it will cause the executable to be output in the main directory. Add the path “bin\ReleaseSmall\” (Windows) or “bin/ReleaseSmall/” (Linux) in front of it to change the directory (it is a relative path from the root of the project). The

Execution working dir:

refers to where the program will be executed when

Run

or

Build and run

are selected. The default setting “.” is fine (it refers to the project’s directory). The

Objects output dir:

needs to be changed to “obj\ReleaseSmall\” (Windows) or “obj/ReleaseSmall/” (Linux) in order to be consistent with the remainder of the project. The

Build target files:

currently has nothing selected. This is a problem, as nothing will be compiled if this target is built. Check all the boxes.

The next step is to change the target’s settings. Click

Build options…

to access the settings. The first tab the comes up has a series of compiler flags accessible through check boxes. Select “Strip all symbols from binary” and “Optimize generated code for size”. The flags here contain many of the more common options, however, custom arguments may be passed. Switch to the

Other options

sub-tab and add the following switches.


-fno-rtti
-fno-exceptions
-ffunction-sections
-fdata-sections
-flto

Now switch to the

Linker settings

tab. The

Link libraries:

box provides a spot to add various libraries (for example,

wxmsw28u

for the Windows Unicode version of the

wxWidgets

monolithic dll). This program does not require any such libraries. The custom switches from the previous step require their link-time counterparts. Add


-flto
-Os
-Wl,--gc-sections
-shared-libgcc
-shared-libstdc++

to the

Other linker options:

tab. (For further details on what these switches do, see the GCC documentation on

optimization options

and

linker options

.)

Virtual Targets

Click

OK

to accept these changes and return to the previous dialog. Now that there are two release builds, it will take two separate runs of

Build

or

Build and run

to compile both. Fortunately, Code::Blocks provides the option to chain multiple builds together. Click

Virtual targets…

, then

Add

. Name the virtual target

Releases

and click

OK

. In the right-hand

Build targets contained

box, select both

Release

and

Release small

. Close out of this box and hit

OK

on the main window.

The virtual target

Releases

will now be available from the

Compiler Toolbar

; building this should result in the following output.


-------------- Build: Release in HelloWorld ---------------

Compiling: main.cpp
Compiling: hello.cpp
Linking console executable: bin\Release\HelloWorld.exe
Output size is 457.50 KB

-------------- Build: Release Small in HelloWorld ---------------

Compiling: main.cpp
Compiling: hello.cpp
Linking console executable: bin\ReleaseSmall\HelloWorld.exe
Output size is 8.00 KB

Process terminated with status 0 (0 minutes, 1 seconds)


0 errors, 0 warnings (0 minutes, 1 seconds)

Đăng nhập/Đăng ký
Ranking
Cộng đồng
|
Kiến thức
|
Công nghệ
27 tháng 05, 2022
Admin
14:50 27/05/2022
Cài đặt và viết chương trình C++ trên Code::Blocks
Cùng tác giả
Không có dữ liệu
0
0
0
Admin
2995 người theo dõi
1283
184
Có liên quan
Không có dữ liệu
Chia sẻ kiến thức – Kết nối tương lai
Về chúng tôi
Về chúng tôi
Giới thiệu
Chính sách bảo mật
Điều khoản dịch vụ
Học miễn phí
Học miễn phí
Khóa học
Luyện tập
Cộng đồng
Cộng đồng
Kiến thức
Tin tức
Hỏi đáp
CÔNG TY CỔ PHẦN CÔNG NGHỆ GIÁO DỤC VÀ DỊCH VỤ BRONTOBYTE
The Manor Central Park, đường Nguyễn Xiển, phường Đại Kim, quận Hoàng Mai, TP. Hà Nội
THÔNG TIN LIÊN HỆ
[email protected]
©2024 TEK4.VN
Copyright © 2024
TEK4.VN

Basic C++ Projects in Code::Blocks

To practice programming in C++ you are going to need a C++ compiler. But a compiler is just a program that translates source code into object code. Very few people actually just a compiler by itself. Instead, they use an Integrated Development Environment, or IDE for short, a package of software that includes

  • a compiler
  • an editor for writing code
  • a debugger for helping to find out why the code isn’t working, and
  • a project manager that ties everything together so that the other pieces can be easily launched to work with all of the code that you prepare for a project.

In CS250, you will be using the Code::Blocks IDE, so to prepare for that course you should become familiar with it.

1 Getting the Code::Blocks IDE

how to create a new c project in code blocks
how to create a new c project in code blocks

Code::Blocks là gì?

Đây là môi trường phát triển tích hợp (IDE) miễn phí được xây dựng để đáp ứng các nhu cầu khắt khe nhất của người dùng trong lập trình các phần mềm được viết bằng ngôn ngữ C, C++ hoặc Fortran. Nó có thể hoạt động được trên nhiều nền tảng như MacOS, Linux hoặc Windows và hỗ trợ nhiều trình biên dịch như MS Visual C++ và GNU GCC.

Bên cạnh đó, Code::Blocks còn có giao diện thân thiện, tổ hợp tính năng đa dạng và có thể dễ dàng thêm các tính năng mới. Điều này có được là do thiết kế trên khung plugin cho phép FDE này mở rộng tính năng bằng cách cài đặt hoặc viết các mã plugin. Ví dụ như chức năng biên dịch và gỡ lỗi trên Code::Blocks được bổ sung bởi các plugin.

Xem thêm bài viết khác

  • Danh sách code Kaizen và cách nhập
  • Danh sách code Đại Soái 3Q và cách nhập
  • Những điều cần biết về gỡ lỗi trong Code::Blocks
  • DDR6: Những điều cần biết về Ram mới nhất
  • Cách lưu lại công thức và phương trình thường dùng trong MathType
  • Cách làm game oẳn tù tì trên Scratch
  • Mẹo CSS mà mọi lập trình viên đều cần biết
  • Hướng dẫn tải và cài đặt phần mềm sắp xếp thời khóa biểu TKB
  • Cách xem Trái đất trên Solar System 3D Simulator
  • Hướng đẫn sử dụng Kahoot! cho người mới bắt đầu
  • Các ứng dụng phục vụ việc học dành cho học sinh – sinh viên
  • Hướng dẫn làm bài kiểm tra tập huấn sách Cánh diều

Đối với những ai lần đầu tiên biết đến Code::Blocks thì khái niệm Code::Blocks là gì chính là thông tin quan trọng mà bạn cần tìm hiểu kỹ về loại IDE này. Phần mềm lập trình này được nhận xét là khá thân thiện với người sử dụng và rất hữu ích trong việc xây dựng và phát triển các chương trình.

Mục lục

codeblocks c project with multiple files
codeblocks c project with multiple files

How to compile and run C program in CodeBlocks

Once you created your first C program it’s time to compile and run the program.

Code::Blocks

The free C/C++ and Fortran IDE.

Code::Blocks is a free C/C++ and Fortran IDE built to meet the most demanding needs of its users. It is designed to be very extensible and fully configurable.

Built around a plugin framework, Code::Blocks can be extended with plugins. Any kind of functionality can be added by installing/coding a plugin. For instance, event compiling and debugging functionality is provided by plugins!

If you ’re new here, you can read the user manual or visit the Wiki for documentation. And don’t forget to visit and join our forums to find help or general discussion about Code::Blocks.

We hope you enjoy using Code::Blocks!

The Code::Blocks Team

How to create C program in CodeBlocks IDE

  1. Open CodeBlocks IDE and create a new file. Click on File → New → File.
  2. From the New form template window select C/C++ source and click Go button.
  3. If you see a welcome message, click next to skip the welcome message. Make sure you have checked Skip this next time checkbox if you do not want to see this welcome message again.

    Next, select your language from C/C++ source window and click Next button.

  4. Give name to your file and specify the location.

    It is always recommended to save all your C programs in a C workspace (directory). Creating a C workspace is onetime process. For now, create a new C workspace (folder) with name “Codeforwin C tutorials” anywhere in your computer.

    Once you created a C workspace, click the ellipsis button present under File name with full path. Browse your C workspace, mention the file name click Finish.

  5. Write and save your first C program. Press Ctrl + S to save.For now you can simply copy paste the hello world C program.

    #include

    int main() { printf("Hello, Codeforwin!"); return 0; }

How to use CodeBlocks for C/C++ Programming | The Complete Guide
How to use CodeBlocks for C/C++ Programming | The Complete Guide

Lập trình phần mềm giáo dục (Toy program) mà không cần tạo dự án

Toy Program là một chương trình máy tính nhỏ, thường được dùng cho mục đích giáo dục. Để viết các phần mềm kiểu này (ví dụ những bài tập lập trình vài dòng đơn giản), hãy thực hiện theo các bước sau:

1. File ⇒ New ⇒ Empty File.

2. Nhập dòng code sau (sao chép & dán):

// First C++ program to say Hello#include

using namespace std;int main() {cout << “Hello, world!” << endl;return 0;}

Lưu file dưới dạng Hello.cpp trong thư mục dự án (ví dụ: d:\project).

3. Build (Biên dịch và Liên kết): Chọn menu Build ⇒ Build (Ctrl-F9).

4. Chạy: Chọn menu Build ⇒ Run (Ctrl-F10).

Lưu ý, trong trường hợp không tạo dự án, bạn không thể gỡ lỗi chương trình.

Infrastructure migration

We will soon migrate the rest of our services to the new infrastructure. This will provide us better performance and uptime.

Hướng dẫn viết các chương trình C/C++ trong CodeBlocks

Cách sử dụng Code Block để viết chương trình C++ như thế nào? Hãy cùng Download.vn tìm hiểu cách dùng Code Block để lập trình phần mềm bằng ngôn ngữ này nhé!

Lập trình là một trong số ngành “hot” tại Việt Nam và trên thế giới nói chung. Bởi nó là nền tảng cần phải có để tạo nên phần mềm, hệ thống tự động hóa, lưu & chia sẻ file và nhiều hơn thế nữa. Thật may, hiện bạn có thể tự học và thiết kế những chương trình mong muốn nhờ sự trợ giúp của các phần mềm chuyên dụng và CodeBlocks là một trong số đó.

CodeBlocks là phần mềm cực kỳ nổi tiếng trong lĩnh vực lập trình. Về cơ bản, nó là một IDE miễn phí dành cho Windows, Mac và Linux. Dù mới chỉ có phiên bản tiếng Anh, CodeBocks đã được rất nhiều lập trình viên trên thế giới tin dùng suốt nhiều năm liền. Hơn nữa, Code ::Blocks còn kèm hướng dẫn sử dụng chi tiết nên không quá khó sử dụng với người mới bắt đầu.

Về cơ bản, bạn chỉ cần cài CodeBlocks theo hướng dẫn, thiết lập cấu hình cài đặt cần thiết là có thể sử dụng được ngay. Ở bài viết này, chúng ta hãy bắt đầu từ C++. Sử dụng Code Block lập trình bằng ngôn ngữ C+ không khó. Dưới đây là hướng dẫn chi tiết C++ Code Block.

Creating a Project In CodeBlocks
Creating a Project In CodeBlocks

Changing file composition

A single source file is of little uses in programs of any useful complexity. In order to handle this, Code::Blocks has several very simple methods of adding additional files to the project.

Adding a blank file

In this example, we will be splitting the function


main.cpp

    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;

into a separate file.


Note: it is generally improper programming style to create a function this small; it is done here to give a simple example.

To add the new file to the project, bring up the file template wizard through either

File->New->File…

or

Main Toolbar->New file (button)->File…

Select

C/C++ source

and click

Go

. Continue through the following dialogs very much like the original project creation, selecting

C++

when prompted for a language. On the final page, you will be presented with several options. The first box will determine the new filename and location (as noted, the full path is required). You may optionally use the



button to bring up a file browser window to save the file’s location. Checking

Add file to active project

will store the filename in the

Sources

folder of the

Projects

tab of the

Management

panel. Checking any of the build targets will alert Code::Blocks that the file should be compiled and linked into the selected target(s). This can be useful if, for example, the file contains debug specific code, as it will allow the inclusion to (or exclusion from) the appropriate build target(s). In this example, however, the hello function is of key importance, and is required in each target, so select all the boxes and click

Finish

to generate the file.

The newly created file should open automatically; if it does not, open it by double clicking on its file in the

Projects

tab of the

Management

panel. Now add in code for the function

main.cpp

will call.


hello.cpp

#include 

using namespace std;

void hello()
{
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;
}

Adding a pre-existing file

Now that the

hello()

function is in a separate file, the function must be declared for

main.cpp

to use it. Launch a plain text editor (for example Notepad or Gedit), and add the following code.


hello.h

#ifndef HELLO_H_INCLUDED
#define HELLO_H_INCLUDED

void hello();

#endif // HELLO_H_INCLUDED

Save this file as a header (

hello.h

) in the same directory as the other source files in this project. Back in Code::Blocks, click

Project->Add files…

to open a file browser. Here you may select one or multiple files (using combinations of

Ctrl

and

Shift

). (The option

Project->Add files recursively…

will search through all the subdirectories in the given folder, selecting the relevant files for inclusion.) Select

hello.h

, and click

Open

to bring up a dialog requesting to which build targets the file(s) should belong. For this example, select both targets.


Note: if the current project has only one build target, this dialog will be skipped.

Returning to the main source (

main.cpp

) include the header file and replace the

cout

function to match the new setup of the project.


main.cpp

#include "hello.h"

int main()
{
    hello();
    return 0;
}

Press

Ctrl-F9

,

Build->Build

, or

Compiler Toolbar->Build (button – the gear)

to compile the project. If the following output is generated in the build log (in the bottom panel) then all steps were followed correctly.


-------------- Build: Debug in HelloWorld ---------------

Compiling: main.cpp
Compiling: hello.cpp
Linking console executable: bin\Debug\HelloWorld.exe
Output size is 923.25 KB

Process terminated with status 0 (0 minutes, 0 seconds)


0 errors, 0 warnings (0 minutes, 0 seconds)

The executable may now be run by either clicking the

Run

button or hitting

Ctrl-F10

.


Note: the option

F9

(for build and run) combines these commands, and may be more useful in some situations.

See

the build process of Code::Blocks

for what occurs behind the scenes during a compile.

Removing a file

Using the above steps, add a new C++ source file,

useless.cpp

, to the project. Removing this unneeded file from the project is straightforward. Simply right-click on

useless.cpp

in the

Projects

tab of the

Management

pane and select

Remove file from project

.


Note: removing a file from a project does

not

physically delete it; Code::Blocks only removes it from the project management.

1.1 Already taking ODU CS classes?

If you are already an ODU student taking courses in the CS Dept, you can use the Code::Blocks environment on the Department’s network.

To do this, you will need to

  1. Apply for a CS Dept network account (if you don’t already have one) by going to http://www.cs.odu.edu/ and clicking on the “Account Creation” link.
  2. Once you have your account, connect to the ODU CS Virtual Lab. This connects you to a Microsoft Windows machine that will run Code::Blocks.

Even if you are able to the use Virtual Computing Lab, however, you may actually find it more convenient to install your own copy of Code::Blocks.

Add C/C++ libraries to C/C++ Projects using CodeBlocks IDE: Include and Lib Folders + Lib Files
Add C/C++ libraries to C/C++ Projects using CodeBlocks IDE: Include and Lib Folders + Lib Files

1.2 Installing on your own PC

Code::Blocks is free software and runs under Windows, MacOS, and Linux. You can download it here.

  • For Windows, Code::Blocks comes in two varieties. The “mingw” versions include a C++ compiler. The downloads without the “mingw” in the file name assume that you already have a compiler installed on your PC.

  • For MacOS and Linux, you will need to already have a compiler installed.

2 Trying It Out

  1. Run Code::Blocks.

    If this is the first time you have run it, it may try to locate compilers it can work with. If so, select “GNU GCC Compiler”. Click “Set as default”, then “OK”. It should find your compiler.

  2. Let’s start out with a very simple project. Select “File->{}New->{}Project… Select ”Console Application“ and click ”Go“. Move through the Wizard, choosing C++ as the language. Give the project the title ”FirstProject“, click on the ”…” button to choose a place in which to save your work.

    Accept the rest of the defaults until the wizard closes.

  3. On the left you can now see your project structure. If you open the Sources folder, you can see that it has already created a basic main.cpp file for you. Double-click this to open it in the editor.

  4. Let’s make some changes before compiling this. Change the function to look like this:


    #include

    #include

    using namespace std; int main() { string greeting = "Hello world!"; cout << return 0; }


  5. Save this and click the Build button (the blue gear) to attempt compilation. You should see some compilation errors due to the incomplete statement.1

  6. Now put the cursor at the end of the “cout” line and type “greet” (without the quotes). Pause a moment and notice that a box pops up suggesting a possible completion for this variable name. Hit Tab to accept this suggestion. Now finish the program like this:

    greeting.cpp

    #include

    #include

    using namespace std; int main() { string greeting = "Hello world!"; cout << greeting << endl; return 0; }


  7. Save and again click the Build button. This time things should succeed.

  8. Click the Run button (the blue triangle) to execute your program.

3 A More Elaborate Program

  1. Create a new project (still a Console Application) named “tempConvert”.

  2. Remove the automatically generated main.cpp file (right-click on it and select “Remove file…”) from the project and add a new file (File -> New… -> File…) named


    convert.cpp

    .

  3. Edit it to look like this:


    #include

    #include

    using namespace std; // Farenheit to Centigrade converter int main() { double f, c; cout << "Enter a temperature measured in degrees Farenheit: " << flush; cin >> f; // reads f from the keyboard c = (5.0 / 9.0) * (f - 32.0); cout << "In Centigrade, that would be " << c << " degrees." << endl; return 0; }


  4. Try compiling and running this. If you have made any typos, you may get error messages when you compile. That’s OK, just make the fixes, save, and re-compile. (In fact, if you didn’t get any error messages, why not make a few deliberate mistakes just to get familiar with how the IDE behaves?)

4 The Debugger

Now, let’s suppose that this behavior was not what we wanted, but we weren’t sure why. We might want to run the program in a debugger.

  1. First, let’s set a breakpoint. A breakpoint is a location in our code where we would like execution to pause whenever we are debugging.

    In your temperature conversion project, find the line that starts:


    cin >>

    … Click just to the right of the line number. The small red dot indicates that a breakpoint has been set at this line.

  2. From the “Debug” menu, select “Start”. The program will start running, but will pause at the line where you set the breakpoint.

  3. You can now look at the state of the running program in some detail. For example, in the “Debug” menu, select “Debugging Windows”, then “Watches”. The window that pops up allows you to look at the value of variable.

    Click on the plus sign to open up the Local variables list.2

    You can use the various debugger buttons (the ones with the dark red curved arrows) to step through the code, a line at a time.

  4. Try using the “Next” button, a step at a time.

  5. By the way, don’t be surprised if

    and/orappear to contain garbage at first. That’s typical for an uninitialized variables. In fact, had I not wanted to improve the odds of your seeing that, I would have written the code like this:temperature.cpp

    #include

    #include

    using namespace std; // Farenheit to Centigrade converter int main() { cout << "Enter a temperature measured in degrees Farenheit: " << flush; double f; cin >> f; // reads f from the keyboard double c = (5.0 / 9.0) * (f - 32.0); cout << "In Centigrade, that would be " << c << " degrees." << endl; return 0; }


    to minimize the time during which either variable is left uninitialized.

  6. Try making those changes, run the debugger again, and single-step through. Do you see any difference in how the variables behave?

1: If you see an error message that says you are using “an invalid compiler”, then Code::Blocks did not actually locate the compiler properly. From the “Settings” menu, select “Compiler and Debugger”, On the tab “Toolchain excutables”, Use the “…” button for the “Compiler’s Installation Directory” to point it to the directory where you installed MinGW.

2: Unfortunately, I find that the current version has trouble displaying strings.

Changing file composition

A single source file is of little uses in programs of any useful complexity. In order to handle this, Code::Blocks has several very simple methods of adding additional files to the project.

Adding a blank file

In this example, we will be splitting the function


main.cpp

    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;

into a separate file.


Note: it is generally improper programming style to create a function this small; it is done here to give a simple example.

To add the new file to the project, bring up the file template wizard through either

File->New->File…

or

Main Toolbar->New file (button)->File…

Select

C/C++ source

and click

Go

. Continue through the following dialogs very much like the original project creation, selecting

C++

when prompted for a language. On the final page, you will be presented with several options. The first box will determine the new filename and location (as noted, the full path is required). You may optionally use the



button to bring up a file browser window to save the file’s location. Checking

Add file to active project

will store the filename in the

Sources

folder of the

Projects

tab of the

Management

panel. Checking any of the build targets will alert Code::Blocks that the file should be compiled and linked into the selected target(s). This can be useful if, for example, the file contains debug specific code, as it will allow the inclusion to (or exclusion from) the appropriate build target(s). In this example, however, the hello function is of key importance, and is required in each target, so select all the boxes and click

Finish

to generate the file.

The newly created file should open automatically; if it does not, open it by double clicking on its file in the

Projects

tab of the

Management

panel. Now add in code for the function

main.cpp

will call.


hello.cpp

#include 

using namespace std;

void hello()
{
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;
}

Adding a pre-existing file

Now that the

hello()

function is in a separate file, the function must be declared for

main.cpp

to use it. Launch a plain text editor (for example Notepad or Gedit), and add the following code.


hello.h

#ifndef HELLO_H_INCLUDED
#define HELLO_H_INCLUDED

void hello();

#endif // HELLO_H_INCLUDED

Save this file as a header (

hello.h

) in the same directory as the other source files in this project. Back in Code::Blocks, click

Project->Add files…

to open a file browser. Here you may select one or multiple files (using combinations of

Ctrl

and

Shift

). (The option

Project->Add files recursively…

will search through all the subdirectories in the given folder, selecting the relevant files for inclusion.) Select

hello.h

, and click

Open

to bring up a dialog requesting to which build targets the file(s) should belong. For this example, select both targets.


Note: if the current project has only one build target, this dialog will be skipped.

Returning to the main source (

main.cpp

) include the header file and replace the

cout

function to match the new setup of the project.


main.cpp

#include "hello.h"

int main()
{
    hello();
    return 0;
}

Press

Ctrl-F9

,

Build->Build

, or

Compiler Toolbar->Build (button – the gear)

to compile the project. If the following output is generated in the build log (in the bottom panel) then all steps were followed correctly.


-------------- Build: Debug in HelloWorld ---------------

Compiling: main.cpp
Compiling: hello.cpp
Linking console executable: bin\Debug\HelloWorld.exe
Output size is 923.25 KB

Process terminated with status 0 (0 minutes, 0 seconds)


0 errors, 0 warnings (0 minutes, 0 seconds)

The executable may now be run by either clicking the

Run

button or hitting

Ctrl-F10

.


Note: the option

F9

(for build and run) combines these commands, and may be more useful in some situations.

See

the build process of Code::Blocks

for what occurs behind the scenes during a compile.

Removing a file

Using the above steps, add a new C++ source file,

useless.cpp

, to the project. Removing this unneeded file from the project is straightforward. Simply right-click on

useless.cpp

in the

Projects

tab of the

Management

pane and select

Remove file from project

.


Note: removing a file from a project does

not

physically delete it; Code::Blocks only removes it from the project management.

ASMR Programming - Spinning Cube - No Talking
ASMR Programming – Spinning Cube – No Talking

Hướng dẫn cài đặt Code::Blocks

2.Bước 1: Tải Code::Blocks

  • Truy cập đường link: http://www.codeblocks.org/downloads. Nhấn chọn “Download the binary release”
  • Chọn nền tảng đang hoạt động của bạn (có 3 sự lựa chọn là Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8.x / 10, Linux 32 and 64-bit và Mac OS X).
  • Tải xuống cài đặt với trình biên dịch GCC.

2.Bước 2: Cài đặt Code::Blocks

  • Chạy cài đặt đã tải và chấp nhận các tùy chọn mặc định
  • Xác minh đường dẫn của trình biên dịch và trình gỡ lỗi
  • Ví dụ với Code::Blocks 13.12 cho Windows:

Vào menu Settings, chọn Compiler…. Tại Selected Compiler, bạn nhấn chọn GNU GCC Compiler và chọn tab Toolchain Executables. Sau đó kiểm tra mục Compiler’s Installation Directory.

Nó sẽ được đặt thành thư mục phụ có tên MinGW của thư mục cài đặt Code::Blocks. Giả sử nếu Code::Blocks được cài đặt trong ổ C dưới dạng với đường dẫn c: \ Program Files \ codeblocks, bạn hãy chuyển nó thành c:\Program Files\codeblocks\MinGW.

Áp dụng cách kiểm tra tương tự với trình gỡ lỗi. Bạn cũng chọn GDB/CDB debugger trong mục Debugger…: tại menu Settings và nhấn vào Default. Tại mục Executable path, bạn nhập tên đường dẫn đâỳ đủ của gdb.exe, chẳng hạn như c : \ Program Files \ codeblocks \ MinGW \ bin \ gdb.exe .

Gợi ý cách viết chương trình C/C++ trong Code::Blocks

Sau khi đã cài đặt Code::Blocks cho máy tính, việc tiếp theo là hãy thử tạo một dự án cho từng ứng dụng của bạn.

Một dự án thông thường sẽ bao gồm những tệp có liên quan như các mã nguồn, tệp tiêu đề và một số tài nguyên khác. Bạn hãy tiến hành theo các bước sau:

  • Chọn File -> New -> Project…Thông thường bạn nên chọn Console Application cho dự án đầu tiên của mình. Sau đó nhấn Go.
  • Khi trình hướng dẫn Console Application hiện ra, bạn nhấn Next -> C++ -> Next. Trong mục Project Title, bạn nhập HelloProject. Trong mục Folder to create project in, đặt thành thư mục đang hoạt động của bạn, ví dụ như d:\project. Chọn chấp nhận tất cả phần còn lại và nhấn Next.

Lúc này, thư mục dự án Hello Project sẽ xuất hiện trong ổ D, mục project với tên HelloProject.cbp. Bạn có thể tiếp tục tạo thêm các dự án mới trong thư mục project này.

Trong trường Compiler, chấp nhận tùy chọn mặc định của GNU GCC Compiler và nhấn kết thúc.

  • Trong phần Management, chọn tab Projects -> mở rộng nút dự án Hello Project -> mở rộng nút Source. Kích đúp chuột vào main.cpp.
  • Để tạo chương trình, chọn Build trong menu Build
  • Để chạy chương trình, chọn Run trong menu Build

Trên đây là những thông tin về môi trường phát triển tích hợp mã nguồn mở miễn phí Code::Blocks mà bạn cần biết để ứng dụng cho việc xây dựng, phát triển các chương trình và phần mềm của mình. Đối với những ai mới bắt đầu, bạn nên tìm hiểu thật kỹ khái niệm Code::Blocks là gì trước khi cài đặt về máy và tạo một dự án mới với Code::Blocks nhé.

C Programming Full Course for free 🕹️
C Programming Full Course for free 🕹️

Viết chương trình trong dự án

Thay vì lập trình phần mềm vài dòng, bạn có thể tạo một dự án cho mỗi ứng dụng. Một dự án chứa các file liên quan như code nguồn, tệp tiêu đề, tài nguyên liên quan khác. Ngoài ra, trong CodeBlocks, bạn chỉ có thể gỡ lỗi chương trình trong dự án. Phần mềm một file không được hỗ trợ gỡ lỗi

  1. File ⇒ New ⇒ Project… ⇒ Console Application ⇒ Go.
  2. Thuật sĩ Console Application sẽ xuất hiện:

    1. Next
    2. Chọn C++⇒ Next.
    3. Trong Project Title, nhập HelloProject. Trong Folder to create project in, hãy đặt thư mục mà bạn đang xử lý. Ví dụ: d:\project. Chấp nhận lựa chọn mặc định cho phần còn lại ⇒ Next. Thư mục dự án HelloProject sẽ được tạo trong d:\project với cùng một tên file cấu hình dự án của HelloProject.cbp. Sau đó, bạn có thể tạo nhiều dự án hơn trong thư mục đang làm việc đó (d:\project).
    4. Trong trường Compiler, chấp nhận các cài đặt mặc định cho GNU GCC Compiler ⇒ Finish.
  3. Trong bảng Management⇒ Chọn tab Project ⇒ Mở rộng node dự án HelloProject ⇒ Mở rộng node Source ⇒ Click đúp main.cpp. Đây là một chương trình mẫu và nó sẽ hiện thông báo chào mừng Hello, world.
  4. Để xây dựng một chương trình, chọn menu Build⇒ Build.
  5. Để chạy chương trình, chọn menu Build⇒ Run.
  6. Để tạo nhiều file nguồn hơn hoặc file tiêu đề trong dự án:
    1. File ⇒ New File… ⇒ Chọn nguồn hoặc tiêu đề C/C++.
    2. C++ ⇒ Next.
    3. Trong Filename with full path ⇒ Click Navigate để điều hướng sang thư mục dự án và nhập tên file mới. Tích cả hai ô Debug và Release (hoặc All) ⇒ Finish.

Khởi chạy dự án

Bạn có thể tạo nhiều dự án hơn. Tuy nhiên, lệnh Build và Run luôn được áp dụng cho các dự án đang hoạt động (active) được bôi đậm. Để kích hoạt dự án, click chuột phải vào tên của nó ⇒ “Activate Project”.

Mở dự án hiện tại

Để mở một dự án hiện tại, thực hiện một trong những việc sau:

  1. Từ menu File ⇒ Recent Projects ⇒ Chọn dự án mong muốn.
  2. Từ menu FileOpen… ⇒ Điều hướng tới thư mục dự án ⇒ Chọn ProjectName.cbp, trong đó .cbp viết tắt của CodeBlocks-Project.

The project wizard

Launch the Project Wizard through

File->New->Project…

to start a new project. Here there are many pre-configured templates for various types of projects, including the option to create custom templates. Select

Console application

, as this is the most common for general purposes, an click

Go

.


Note: red text instead of black text below any of the icons signifies it is using a customized

wizard script

.

The console application wizard will appear next. Continue through the menus, selecting

C++

when prompted for a language. In the next screen, give the project a name and type or select a destination folder. As seen below, Code::Blocks will generate the remaining entries from these two.

Finally, the wizard will ask if this project should use the default compiler (normally GCC) and the two default builds:

Debug

and

Release

. All of these settings are fine. Press finish and the project will be generated. The main window will turn gray, but that is not a problem, the source file needs only to be opened. In the

Projects

tab of the

Management

pane on the left expand the folders and double click on the source file

main.cpp

to open it in the editor.

This file contains the following standard code.


main.cpp

#include 

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "Hello world!" << endl;
    return 0;
}
C++ Full Course for free ⚡️
C++ Full Course for free ⚡️

Các lỗi phổ biến khi lập trình trên CodeBlocks

Không thể biên dịch bất kỳ chương trình C/C++ sau khi cài đặt CodeBlocks

Kiểm tra:

  • Bạn đã tải CodeBlocks bằng MinGW GNU C/C++ Compiler (ví dụ, codeblocks-10.05mingw-setup.exe).
  • Tới Settings > Compiler > Chọn tab Toolchain Executables > Tích Compiler’s Installation Directory. Nó sẽ được thiết lập sang thư mục phụ MinGW của thư mục cài đặt CodeBlocks. Ví dụ: c:\Program Files\codeblocks\MinGW nghĩa là CodeBlocks được cài trong c:\Program Files\codeblocks.

Không thể build hay chạy chương trình – Các nút Build/Run và các mục trong menu chuyển xám, không thể chọn chương trình

Một chương trình trước đó vẫn đang chạy. Bạn cần kết thúc chương trình này bằng cách đóng cửa sổ bảng điều khiển đầu ra.

Lỗi tham chiếu không xác định tới WinMain@16

Kiểm tra xem bạn đã có một main() trong hàm hay chưa. Hãy chắc chắn bạn đã gõ đúng chính tả hàm này.

(Đối với chương trình C) Lỗi hệ thống: xxx.exe has stopped working

Kiểm tra hàm scanf(). Bạn có thể loại bỏ & trước tên biến.

Viết nhiều Toy Program trong một dự án

Mặc dù một dự án có thể chứa nhiều file nguồn, chỉ có một hàm main() trong số tất cả file nguồn. Vì thế, bạn không thể đặt 2 toy program trong một dự án bởi bạn sẽ gặp lỗi nhiều định nghĩa “main”. Bạn cần tạo một dự án cho từng chương trình.

Tuy nhiên, CodeBlocks cho phép bạn thêm hoặc xóa file trong một dự án. File được di chuyển không bị xóa mà vẫn nằm trong thư mục. Chúng ta có thể dùng tính năng này để viết nhiều toy program trong cùng một dự án. Quá trình thực hiện như sau:

  1. Tạo dự án C/C++ mang tên ToyProgramProject. Bạn sẽ tự động nhận được main.cpp.
  2. Viết toy program của bạn vào main.cpp. Xây dựng và chạy chương trình.
  3. Để viết chương trnfh khác: Chọn File ⇒ Save File as ⇒ Đặt tên cho chương trình, ví dụ: “myfirst.cpp”. Loại bỏ nó khỏi dự án (do mỗi dự án chỉ có thể chứa một file có hàm main()) bằng cách click chuột phải vào myfirst.cpp ⇒ “remove file from project”.
  4. Tiếp tục viết toy program thứ hai trên main.cpp. Xây dựng và khởi chạy.
  5. Lặp lại bước 3 và 4 cho toy program khác.
  6. Giả sử bạn muốn chạy myfirst.cpp. Trước tiên, xóa main.cpp khỏi dự án. Click chuột phải vào dự án đó ⇒ Add File… ⇒ Chọn “myfirst.cpp” ⇒ Open ⇒ Tích cả hai ô Debug và Release ⇒ OK. Giờ bạn có thể xây dựng và khởi chạy myfirst.cpp.

Tóm lại, dùng Add File và Remove File để đặt file toy program mong muốn với hàm main() trong dự án đang hoạt động. Sau đó, bạn có thể Build dự án và Run toy program ngay.

Decrusting the tracing crate
Decrusting the tracing crate

Keywords searched by users: code blocks c project

How To Create A New C Project In Code Blocks - Youtube
How To Create A New C Project In Code Blocks – Youtube
How To Create C Projects In Code Blocks - Youtube
How To Create C Projects In Code Blocks – Youtube
Creating A New Project - Code::Blocks
Creating A New Project – Code::Blocks
Codeblocks User Manual
Codeblocks User Manual
How To Create C Projects In Code Blocks - Youtube
How To Create C Projects In Code Blocks – Youtube
Codeblocks User Manual
Codeblocks User Manual
Codeblocks User Manual
Codeblocks User Manual

See more here: kientrucannam.vn

Trả lời

Email của bạn sẽ không được hiển thị công khai. Các trường bắt buộc được đánh dấu *