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Home » Arduino Uno Test Code | Sơ Đồ Lắp Đặt

Arduino Uno Test Code | Sơ Đồ Lắp Đặt

How to Check Arduino UNO is Working or Not 2023 | I.T. Knows

Step 6: Next Step:

Now in the flash section, click read option and then select the location where you want to save the file. Here I am saving this on desktop and naming as blink and extension as .hex. Keep in mind to set the format as Intel hex. Now click on Go button and it will take few seconds to generate the files properly. Otherwise, the software will show errors. Always select read when you are getting code back from Arduino and write when you are programming Arduino.

Sometime Arduino is programmed using EEPROM, so repeat the Same step for it but change the file extension as .eep.

You can see all the procedure of the programming in real time in the black tab named as compiler tab. After that you can see the hex files of your program on the selected location and you can examine them using Notepad or Notepad plus.

Step 5: How to Test Your SSD1306 OLED Arduino Code Display

The OLEDs are great. They lit really well. They don’t consume any power when the display is minimal. They can be read in an outdoor environment as well. They make a great HMI value addition for any projects. We can display text, number, graphics and stories on it. It is indeed a good tool and skill to have it. Let us ee how to get the OLED Arduino code online here 👇

  • Visit https://wokwi.com/playground/ssd1306
  • Copy your code and paste it into the editor field
  • It is usual to have the I2C address of the SSD1306 OLED to have either 0x3D or 0x3C as the address.

I have used the existing code directly present in the link, but I hope it is straight forward to replace the code in the editor contents to swap with the code you want to test

Please ask questions if you have any. Please comment and like if this is useful 😃

In the next step, I will share how I test the LCD1602 Arduino code online 👉

How to Check Arduino UNO is Working or Not 2023 | I.T. Knows
How to Check Arduino UNO is Working or Not 2023 | I.T. Knows

Step 1: Story

I am working with AVR microcontrollers specially with Arduino for a long time. Arduino can be programmed in a number of ways. Because Arduino is open source and there are a lot of premade programs are available on GitHub, Instructables, Hackaday and Hackster. So, there are lot of programming software which supports different languages/ order and format.

But every piece of code is in the form of zero or one for the microcontroller. Once a program gets uploaded in the flash memory then there is no mean to recover the original. But we get the same program back from Arduino in Hex format. Now let’s have a look on hex files and how to recover your program from Arduino. This project is sponsored by PCBWAY.

Introduction: How to Run/test Your Arduino Code Online for Free?

There are various options to run Arduino code online. Which is the best depends on how useful it is to the user’s specific use case. there can not be one scale to measure the performance of all such Arduino simulation options. Some are free, some are paid, some are up to date and some are outdated, some have good options and some have poor. So, I cannot quantise. Let us start with my preferred approach, Wokwi Arduino Simulator 👉👉

how to check arduino is working or not ?
how to check arduino is working or not ?

Step 4: How to Test Arduino NeoPixel LEDs Online?

NeoPixel LEDs are individually addressable LEDs. Only one data line is connected to all the LEDs. All the LEDs in the strip are connected in series. Each LED will have a small logic IC which will understand the incoming data, process it and light up the RGB LEDs accordingly. It is quite a fascinating idea which is now a globally called FastLEDs or NeoPixel LEDs, but basically, all these are individually addressable LEDs.

  • Copy the code of your NeoPixel project.

  • Make a note of the number of LEDs and number of the Arduino pin to which the data line of the LED is connected to

  • I will also pick a random example from the internet

  • I choose

    adafruit link

    to take a sample code for our test

  • I changed the pin number of Arduino from 0 (from the code) to 6.

  • I changed the number of LEDs from 24 to 8

  • Below is the screenshot of the running simulation in action 😀😀😀


Sample code:

#include

#define NUM_LEDS 24 // 24 LED NeoPixel ring #define NEOPIXEL_PIN 0 // Pin D0 on Gemma #define VIBRATION_PIN 1 // Pin D1 on Gemma #define ANALOG_RANDOMNESS_PIN A1 // Not connected to anything

#define DEFAULT_FRAME_LEN 60 #define MAX_FRAME_LEN 255 #define MIN_FRAME_LEN 5 #define COOLDOWN_AT 2000 #define DIM_AT 2500 #define BRIGHTNESS_HIGH 128 #define BRIGHTNESS_LOW 32

Adafruit_NeoPixel pixels = Adafruit_NeoPixel(NUM_LEDS, NEOPIXEL_PIN);

uint32_t color = pixels.Color(0, 120, 30); uint8_t offset = 0; uint8_t frame_len = DEFAULT_FRAME_LEN; uint32_t last_vibration = 0; uint32_t last_frame = 0;

void setup() { // Random number generator is seeded from an unused ‘floating’ // analog input – this helps ensure the random color choices // aren’t always the same order. randomSeed(analogRead(ANALOG_RANDOMNESS_PIN)); // Enable pullup on vibration switch pin. When the switch // is activated, it’s pulled to ground (LOW). pinMode(VIBRATION_PIN, INPUT_PULLUP); pixels.begin(); }

void loop() { uint32_t t;

// Compare millis() against lastFrame time to keep frame-to-frame // animation timing consistent. Use this idle time to check the // vibration switch for activity. while(((t = millis()) – last_frame) <= frame_len) { if(!digitalRead(VIBRATION_PIN)) { // Vibration sensor activated? color = pixels.Color( // Pick a random RGB color random(256), // red random(256), // green random(256) // blue ); frame_len = DEFAULT_FRAME_LEN; // Reset frame timing to default last_vibration = t; // Save last vibration time } }

// Stretch out frames if nothing has happened in a couple of seconds: if((t – last_vibration) > COOLDOWN_AT) { if(++frame_len > MAX_FRAME_LEN) frame_len = MIN_FRAME_LEN; }

// If we haven’t registered a vibration in DIM_AT ms, go dim: if((t – last_vibration) > DIM_AT) { pixels.setBrightness(BRIGHTNESS_LOW); } else { pixels.setBrightness(BRIGHTNESS_HIGH); }

// Erase previous pixels and light new ones: pixels.clear(); for(int i=0; i

pixels.show();

// Increase pixel offset until it hits 6, then roll back to 0: if(++offset == 6) offset = 0;

last_frame = t; }

Please leave a comment if you have any questions

It is possible to change the number of LEDs to 24 or any number you want

It is possible to also change the Arduino pin number to which the LED data line is connected to

Please leave a comment if you have any questions

In the coming days, there will be an updated user interface where it will be even more fun to play with the simulations 🙂

Let us see how to test your LCD code online in the next steps

Uploading the program

Now, simply click the «Upload» button (Right arrow on the left, as marked in the figure to the left) in the compiler.

The first time you use a new sketch you will sometimes be asked to save the sketch in a folder with the same name as your sketch before it will run as expected.

Wait a few seconds – you should see the RX and TX LEDs on the Arduino board flashing. If the upload is successful, the message «Done uploading.» will appear in the status bar.

Arduino UNO - First Test for Beginners
Arduino UNO – First Test for Beginners

Uploading the program

Now, simply click the «Upload» button (Right arrow on the left, as marked in the figure to the left) in the compiler.

The first time you use a new sketch you will sometimes be asked to save the sketch in a folder with the same name as your sketch before it will run as expected.

Wait a few seconds – you should see the RX and TX LEDs on the Arduino board flashing. If the upload is successful, the message «Done uploading.» will appear in the status bar.

Lập trình và nạp code

Trước khi nạp code ta cần kiểm tra xem IDE đã kết nối tới mạch hay chưa, để làm điều này ta vào Tools > Port và xem cổng COM có đúng Arduino hay không.

Sau khi kiểm tra đúng cổng, ta cần báo với IDE loại board Arduino nào ta đang dùng, để làm điều này ta vào Tools > Board và chọn “Arduino / Genuino Uno”.

Tiếp đến ta nhập đoạn code sau:


int led = 8; //chân digital kết nối với LED thông qua trở void setup() { pinMode(led, OUTPUT); } void loop() { digitalWrite(led, HIGH); delay(1000); digitalWrite(led, LOW); delay(1000); }

Giải thích:

  • Trong hàm setup ta khởi tạo trạng thái cho chân pin qua hàm pinMode(), có 2 chế độ cơ bản OUTPUT và INPUT, với OUTPUT là để xuất tín hiệu điều khiển ( như điều khiển LED bật tắt trong bài này ) , còn INPUT là đọc giá trị bên ngoài vào ( mình sẽ giới thiệu trong bài khác sau ).

  • Trong hàm loop ta có hàm digitalWrite, đây là hàm để đặt trạng thái điều khiển cho các chân digital, có 2 trạng thái là HIGH ( hay nhập giá trị 1 cũng được ) và LOW ( giá trị 0 ), ở đây HIGH là bật LED, LOW là tắt LED, còn hàm delay làm chương trình ngừng chạy trong khoảng thời gian là ms, giúp ta giữ trạng thái LED hiện tại trước khi sang trạng thái mới.

Bây giờ ta sẽ cần phải biên dịch mã trước khi nạp code cho mạch. Arduino là một mạch nhỏ chỉ có thể đọc mã máy, nhưng mã được viết trong IDE lại là ngôn ngữ C. Do đó, để Arduino hiểu được các lệnh C, chúng ta phải chuyển chúng thành mã máy, quá trình này được gọi là biên dịch. Để biên dịch mã, hãy nhấp vào nút “Verify” được hiển thị bên dưới:

Khi IDE đã hoàn tất việc biên dịch, bạn sẽ thấy một kết quả ở cửa sổ đầu ra ở cuối IDE. Cửa sổ đầu ra rất hữu ích để xem các thông tin trả về thành công, lỗi, cảnh báo và việc sử dụng bộ nhớ:

Bước cuối cùng là nạp code, để thực hiện việc này, hãy nhấp vào nút “Upload”, là mũi tên ở bên phải của nút “Verify”.

Đèn LED trên bo mạch của Arduino bây giờ sẽ nhấp nháy khi bạn nạp code, sau khi nạp code xong hãy tận hưởng thành quả !

Vậy là mình đã hướng dẫn xong lập trình cơ bản với ví dụ Led tự động, ở các bài sau mình sẽ giới thiệu tiếp các dự án khác về Arduino để dựa vào đó bạn có thể lập trình Arduino một cách thành thạo hơn.

Hẹn gặp lại.

All rights reserved

Is there an automatic test shield + test code available for the Arduino Uno?

We have a LOT of Arduino uno’s at school. And when I give an Arduino to our students I want to be sure that I’m not giving a fried version with a blown I/O pin for example. Nothing is more frustrating for a student to search for a bug in their code while the Arduino is fried by a previous user.

So I want to do a complete functional test (like a production test) when I get the boards back. Any suggestions? I couldn’t find such a thing on the web…

You want to make a possible damaged controller test itself?

A simple shield will connect each pair of digital pins by two antiparallel LEDs (+ resistors): Then make the LEDs flicker slowly so that you can find out which pair has a damage.

For the analog inputs build a daisy chain of resistors with both ends going to a pair of digital pins. This allows to test each input for correct Vcc (1023) and GND (0) connection as well as increasing or decreasing values from A0 to the highest input pin.

You may also want to check the voltage regulators which are vulnerable to abuse.
The 3.3volt regulator could be checked via an analog pin (or a led).
The 5 volt regulator could simply be checked by powering the Uno via the jack instead of the USB connection.

Did you have real cases that prompted you to seek solution? If so what happened?

Yes there are some fried Arduino’s here. You will never know what happened exactly but I can make an estimated guess… They are using motor shields on 12V, breadboards etc… So it is not unthinkable that a student connects a 12V to an I/O pin by accident.

@ bidrohini
Thanks! I see that company had the same sort of problems that I face here… But the code is gone.

@ johnwasser
Yes these steps are necessary to test such a board. Looping back its own outputs to its inputs and vice versa.

Before I started my job on a school I’ve been designing hardware for years and also test beds for it. One of my smaller products and test bed is shown here below. So I know what it takes to do automatic programming and perform a production test on hardware.

Arduino in 100 Seconds
Arduino in 100 Seconds

Select your serial port

Select the serial device of the Arduino board from the Tools → Serial Port menu.

You will probably have several COM-ports available. The Arduino will most likely be the highest COM-port number. To make sure, you can disconnect your Arduino board and re-open the menu; the entry that disappears should be the Arduino board. Reconnect the board and select the correct serial port.

In the version 1.6.12 of Arduino IDE, the correct com-port will be labelled (Arduino/Genuino Uno) in the port list.

Step 7: How to Upload Hex Files in Arduino:

Now make the same connections with other target Arduino, where you want to flash these files. In this case I am using my 2nd version of Arduino UNO.

Now Open the AVRDUDESS, set the programmer as Arduino. Select the COM port and set the baud rate to 19200.

Detect the programmer, this will auto detect the programming board.

Browse the file location, Click on the Write button. Set the format as Intel Hex.

Then set the fuse bits and lock bits to the original position.

In the options menu select erase all the flash/ EEPROM before uploading program.

Click on GO, this will flash the Hex file to your Arduino.

Control Position and Speed of Stepper motor with L298N module using Arduino | testing stepper motor
Control Position and Speed of Stepper motor with L298N module using Arduino | testing stepper motor

Testing the Arduino Uno Board

To verify that you are receiving correct data you can test it by setting each channel to ground and power and read the output in the Serial Monitor. To do this you need a wire to connect between the input connectors and power connectors on the Arduino Uno board.

  • Connect one end of the wire to A0 port
  • Connect the other end to GND port
  • Analog0 in the Serial Monitor should now read 0.0 volts
  • Remove the wire from GND and connect it to 5V
  • Analog0 should now read approximately 5.0 volts
  • Remove the wire from 5V and connect it to 3.3V
  • Analog0 should now read approximately 3.3 volts
  • Repeat the same procedure with A1, D2 and D3
  • Do you get the same value from the digital port in both 3.3V and 5V?

Watch Now This tutorial has a related video course created by the Real Python team. Watch it together with the written tutorial to deepen your understanding: Arduino With Python: How to Get Started

Microcontrollers have been around for a long time, and they’re used in everything from complex machinery to common household appliances. However, working with them has traditionally been reserved for those with formal technical training, such as technicians and electrical engineers. The emergence of Arduino has made electronic application design much more accessible to all developers. In this tutorial, you’ll discover how to use Arduino with Python to develop your own electronic projects.

You’ll cover the basics of Arduino with Python and learn how to:

  • Set up electronic circuits
  • Set up the Firmata protocol on Arduino
  • Write basic applications for Arduino in Python
  • Control analog and digital inputs and outputs
  • Integrate Arduino sensors and switches with higher-level apps
  • Trigger notifications on your PC and send emails using Arduino

Free Bonus: 5 Thoughts On Python Mastery, a free course for Python developers that shows you the roadmap and the mindset you’ll need to take your Python skills to the next level.

“Hello, World!” With Arduino

The Arduino IDE comes with several example sketches you can use to learn the basics of Arduino. A sketch is the term you use for a program that you can upload to a board. Since the Arduino Uno doesn’t have an attached display, you’ll need a way to see the physical output from your program. You’ll use the Blink example sketch to make a built-in LED on the Arduino board blink.

Uploading the Blink Example Sketch

To get started, connect the Arduino board to your PC using a USB cable and start the Arduino IDE. To open the Blink example sketch, access the File menu and select Examples, then 01.Basics and, finally, Blink:

The Blink example code will be loaded into a new IDE window. But before you can upload the sketch to the board, you’ll need to configure the IDE by selecting your board and its connected port.

To configure the board, access the Tools menu and then Board. For Arduino Uno, you should select Arduino/Genuino Uno:

After you select the board, you have to set the appropriate port. Access the Tools menu again, and this time select Port:

The names of the ports may be different, depending on your operating system. In Windows, the ports will be named

COM4

,

COM5

, or something similar. In macOS or Linux, you may see something like

/dev/ttyACM0

or

/dev/ttyUSB0

. If you have any problems setting the port, then take a look at the Arduino Troubleshooting Page.

After you’ve configured the board and port, you’re all set to upload the sketch to your Arduino. To do that, you just have to press the Upload button in the IDE toolbar:

When you press Upload, the IDE compiles the sketch and uploads it to your board. If you want to check for errors, then you can press Verify before Upload, which will only compile your sketch.

The USB cable provides a serial connection to both upload the program and power the Arduino board. During the upload, you’ll see LEDs flashing on the board. After a few seconds, the uploaded program will run, and you’ll see an LED light blink once every second:

After the upload is finished, the USB cable will continue to power the Arduino board. The program is stored in flash memory on the Arduino microcontroller. You can also use a battery or other external power supply to run the application without a USB cable.

Connecting External Components

In the previous section, you used an LED that was already present on the Arduino board. However, in most practical projects you’ll need to connect external components to the board. To make these connections, Arduino has several pins of different types:

Although these connections are commonly called pins, you can see that they’re not exactly physical pins. Rather, the pins are holes in a socket to which you can connect jumper wires. In the figure above, you can see different groups of pins:

  • Orange rectangle: These are 13 digital pins that you can use as inputs or outputs. They’re only meant to work with digital signals, which have 2 different levels:

    1. Level 0: represented by the voltage 0V
    2. Level 1: represented by the voltage 5V
  • Green rectangle: These are 6 analog pins that you can use as analog inputs. They’re meant to work with an arbitrary voltage between 0V and 5V.
  • Blue rectangle: These are 5 power pins. They’re mainly used for powering external components.

To get started using external components, you’ll connect an external LED to run the Blink example sketch. The built-in LED is connected to digital pin #13. So, let’s connect an external LED to that pin and check if it blinks. (A standard LED is one of the components you saw listed earlier.)

Before you connect anything to the Arduino board, it’s good practice to disconnect it from the computer. With the USB cable unplugged, you’ll be able to connect the LED to your board:

Note that the figure shows the board with the digital pins now facing you.

Using a Breadboard

Electronic circuit projects usually involve testing several ideas, with you adding new components and making adjustments as you go. However, it can be tricky to connect components directly, especially if the circuit is large.

To facilitate prototyping, you can use a breadboard to connect the components. This is a device with several holes that are connected in a particular way so that you can easily connect components using jumper wires:

You can see which holes are interconnected by looking at the colored lines. You’ll use the holes on the sides of the breadboard to power the circuit:

  • Connect one hole on the red line to the power source.
  • Connect one hole on the blue line to the ground.

Then, you can easily connect components to the power source or the ground by simply using the other holes on the red and blue lines. The holes in the middle of the breadboard are connected as indicated by the colors. You’ll use these to make connections between the components of the circuit. These two internal sections are separated by a small depression, over which you can connect integrated circuits (ICs).

You can use a breadboard to assemble the circuit used in the Blink example sketch:

For this circuit, it’s important to note that the LED must be connected according to its polarity or it won’t work. The positive terminal of the LED is called the anode and is generally the longer one. The negative terminal is called the cathode and is shorter. If you’re using a recovered component, then you can also identify the terminals by looking for a flat side on the LED itself. This will indicate the position of the negative terminal.

When you connect an LED to an Arduino pin, you’ll always need a resistor to limit its current and avoid burning out the LED prematurely. Here, you use a 470 Ohm resistor to do this. You can follow the connections and check that the circuit is the same:

  • The resistor is connected to digital pin 13 on the Arduino board.
  • The LED anode is connected to the other terminal of the resistor.
  • The LED cathode is connected to the ground (GND) via the blue line of holes.

For a more detailed explanation, check out How to Use a Breadboard.

After you finish the connection, plug the Arduino back into the PC and re-run the Blink sketch:

As both LEDs are connected to digital pin 13, they blink together when the sketch is running.

How to Check Arduino Uno is working or not | beginner projects | Led blink | Arduino Uno| V-1
How to Check Arduino Uno is working or not | beginner projects | Led blink | Arduino Uno| V-1

Step 1: No Installations No Downloads! – Open a Browser

Open any browser. Currently, all the browsers support the Arduino simulation code execution.

In this tutorial, I will use either firefox or Avast secure browser. I have not seen any significant differences in the performance of the Arduino simulator.

Before we start,

  1. The Arduino code running online or on a simulator may not guarantee the same performance of behaviour when it comes to real hardware
  2. The real hardware poses you more challenges (open connections, short connections, missing connections, pullups, noise, floating pins, dry solder, poor solder, incompatible voltage, insufficient setup and hold times, ringing etc
  3. Software simulations are just the steps to learn but it is not the final destination

A request:

Please comment and like this project, if you find this helpful. Also, feel free to ask questions or suggest any new topics. I will be glad to reply and improve 😀

Let us begin 🙂

Conclusion

Microcontroller platforms are on the rise, thanks to the growing popularity of the Maker Movement and the Internet of Things. Platforms like Arduino are receiving a lot of attention in particular, as they allow developers just like you to use their skills and dive into electronic projects.

You learned how to:

  • Develop applications with Arduino and Python
  • Use the Firmata protocol
  • Control analog and digital inputs and outputs
  • Integrate sensors with higher-level Python applications

You also saw how Firmata may be a very interesting alternative for projects that demand a PC and depend on sensor data. Plus, it’s an easy way to get started with Arduino if you already know Python!

Debugging the Arduino Uno or Nano! (No extra hardware needed!)
Debugging the Arduino Uno or Nano! (No extra hardware needed!)

Step 8: Arduino Used:

Since I am working with Arduino, I designed my own microcontrollers in a better way. So that development boards are easy to use and program. You can see this article, how I made my own microcontroller development boards.

I ordered these PCB from PCBWAY, because the service and quality is best. You will get 5pcs of 2layer PCB in just $5 and if you sign-up to PCBWAY using this link you will get new user coupons to place the first order.

Select your serial port

Select the serial device of the Arduino board from the Tools → Serial Port menu.

You will probably have several COM-ports available. The Arduino will most likely be the highest COM-port number. To make sure, you can disconnect your Arduino board and re-open the menu; the entry that disappears should be the Arduino board. Reconnect the board and select the correct serial port.

In the version 1.6.12 of Arduino IDE, the correct com-port will be labelled (Arduino/Genuino Uno) in the port list.

Top 10 Dự án Arduino HOT nhất 2023 - Tự học lập trình Arduino | Top 10 Arduino projects
Top 10 Dự án Arduino HOT nhất 2023 – Tự học lập trình Arduino | Top 10 Arduino projects

The Arduino Platform

Arduino is an open-source platform composed of hardware and software that allows for the rapid development of interactive electronics projects. The emergence of Arduino drew the attention of professionals from many different industries, contributing to the start of the Maker Movement.

With the growing popularity of the Maker Movement and the concept of the Internet of Things, Arduino has become one of the main platforms for electronic prototyping and the development of MVPs.

Arduino uses its own programming language, which is similar to C++. However, it’s possible to use Arduino with Python or another high-level programming language. In fact, platforms like Arduino work well with Python, especially for applications that require integration with sensors and other physical devices.

All in all, Arduino and Python can facilitate an effective learning environment that encourages developers to get into electronics design. If you already know the basics of Python, then you’ll be able to get started with Arduino by using Python to control it.

The Arduino platform includes both hardware and software products. In this tutorial, you’ll use Arduino hardware and Python software to learn about basic circuits, as well as digital and analog inputs and outputs.

Arduino Hardware

To run the examples, you’ll need to assemble the circuits by hooking up electronic components. You can generally find these items at electronic component stores or in good Arduino starter kits. You’ll need:

  1. An Arduino Uno or other compatible board
  2. A standard LED of any color
  3. A push button
  4. A 10 KOhm potentiometer
  5. A 470 Ohm resistor
  6. A 10 KOhm resistor
  7. A breadboard
  8. Jumper wires of various colors and sizes

Let’s take a closer look at a few of these components.

Component 1 is an Arduino Uno or other compatible board. Arduino is a project that includes many boards and modules for different purposes, and Arduino Uno is the most basic among these. It’s also the most used and most documented board of the whole Arduino family, so it’s a great choice for developers who are just getting started with electronics.

Note: Arduino is an open hardware platform, so there are many other vendors who sell compatible boards that could be used to run the examples you see here. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use the Arduino Uno.

Components 5 and 6 are resistors. Most resistors are identified by colored stripes according to a color code. In general, the first three colors represent the value of a resistor, while the fourth color represents its tolerance. For a 470 Ohm resistor, the first three colors are yellow, violet, and brown. For a 10 KOhm resistor, the first three colors are brown, black, and orange.

Component 7 is a breadboard, which you use to hook up all the other components and assemble the circuits. While a breadboard is not required, it’s recommended that you get one if you intend to begin working with Arduino.

Arduino Software

In addition to these hardware components, you’ll need to install some software. The platform includes the Arduino IDE, an Integrated Development Environment for programming Arduino devices, among other online tools.

Arduino was designed to allow you to program the boards with little difficulty. In general, you’ll follow these steps:

  1. Connect the board to your PC
  2. Install and open the Arduino IDE
  3. Configure the board settings
  4. Write the code
  5. Press a button on the IDE to upload the program to the board

To install the Arduino IDE on your computer, download the appropriate version for your operating system from the Arduino website. Check the documentation for installation instructions:

  • If you’re using Windows, then use the Windows installer to ensure you download the necessary drivers for using Arduino on Windows. Check the Arduino documentation for more details.
  • If you’re using Linux, then you may have to add your user to some groups in order to use the serial port to program Arduino. This process is described in the Arduino install guide for Linux.
  • If you’re using macOS, then you can install Arduino IDE by following the Arduino install guide for OS X.

Note: You’ll be using the Arduino IDE in this tutorial, but Arduino also provides a web editor that will let you program Arduino boards using the browser.

Now that you’ve installed the Arduino IDE and gathered all the necessary components, you’re ready to get started with Arduino! Next, you’ll upload a “Hello, World!” program to your board.

Step 4: How to Get Back Hex Files From Arduino:

Here we need one extra microcontroller as programmer to retrieve the data back form target Arduino.

Upload the ARDUINO ISP code in the programmer Arduino keeping the programmer settings on USBisp using Arduino IDE.

Make the SPI data connection between the programmer and target Arduino board using the wire diagram given below.

#224 🛑 STOP using Serial.print in your Arduino code! THIS is better.
#224 🛑 STOP using Serial.print in your Arduino code! THIS is better.

Step 6: How to Test Arduino LCD1602 Code Online?

LCD1602 when I say, I mean LCD display with 16 columns and two rows. It usually comes with a backlight. the background will either be green or blue for most of the cases. The display is there for decades and is still a good low-cost HMI to add to the projects. Advantage of the readability of the display without backlight in sunlight should not be forgotten 👌

  • Delete the prefilled code in the editor window
  • Paste the example code in the editor window
  • There are a few things to take care

    • Contrast settings
    • Backlight
    • data connections can be 4 bit or 8 bit. 4 bit is sufficient enough as we don’t have to spend a huge amount fo data
    • I2C connections are also a possibility. As of now, this is for LCD in which I2C lines are connected

Let me choose a random LCD1602 code from the internet for example:

Please leave comments 🙏 if you have any questions or suggestions

Step 2: How to Test the Arduino LED Blink Code Online?

LED blink code is the basic example which most of us would have run when exploring hardware circuitry involving an MCU. This is definitely equivalent to the “Hello World” program in computer languages 😀. In this step, we will see how we can test our basic LED blinking code for Arduino

To verify the LED code online, please visit

https://wokwi.com/playground/blink

The view is something like the image shown (might be slightly outdated) 😅

the Right pane is where we will put the code 🙂

Let us try a few LED blink examples:

Code 1 below:

______________________________

/* Blink Turns on an LED for one second, then off for half a second, repeatedly. This example code is in the public domain. */ // Pin 13 has an LED connected on most Arduino boards. // give it a name: int led = 13;

// the setup routine runs once when you press reset: void setup() { // initialize the digital pin as an output. pinMode(led, OUTPUT); }

// the loop routine runs over and over again forever: void loop() { digitalWrite(led, HIGH); // turn the LED on (HIGH is the voltage level) delay(500); // wait for a second digitalWrite(led, LOW); // turn the LED off by making the voltage LOW delay(500); // wait for a second }

________________________________

once I copy the code and paste it in the link above, I could run and test my Arduino code online 😀

Please let me know if you have any trouble in running the LED code in the Link above. Next, we will see the servo motor code!!!

How to Build and Code an Arduino VFO Si5351 PART-1
How to Build and Code an Arduino VFO Si5351 PART-1

Step 9: How to Order PCB From PCBWAY.

First, Go to PCBWAY and sign-up using this link. Click on instant quote and choose the designed PCB dimensions, If wrong then corrected by the team of engineers.

Select the quantity, thickness, color, material and Finishing type.

Calculate the PCB cost and then save it to cart.

Upload the Gerber file, now engineers will inspect the PCB dimensions, tracks and type and give you the final quote (This will take 5 to 10 minutes).

Checkout and get your PCB just in 7 days at home.

“Hello, World!” With Arduino and Python

In the previous section, you uploaded the Blink sketch to your Arduino board. Arduino sketches are written in a language similar to C++ and are compiled and recorded on the flash memory of the microcontroller when you press Upload. While you can use another language to directly program the Arduino microcontroller, it’s not a trivial task!

However, there are some approaches you can take to use Arduino with Python or other languages. One idea is to run the main program on a PC and use the serial connection to communicate with Arduino through the USB cable. The sketch would be responsible for reading the inputs, sending the information to the PC, and getting updates from the PC to update the Arduino outputs.

To control Arduino from the PC, you’d have to design a protocol for the communication between the PC and Arduino. For example, you could consider a protocol with messages like the following:

  • VALUE OF PIN 13 IS HIGH: used to tell the PC about the status of digital input pins
  • SET PIN 11 LOW: used to tell Arduino to set the states of the output pins

With the protocol defined, you could write an Arduino sketch to send messages to the PC and update the states of the pins according to the protocol. On the PC, you could write a program to control the Arduino through a serial connection, based on the protocol you’ve designed. For this, you can use whatever language and libraries you prefer, such as Python and the PySerial library.

Fortunately, there are standard protocols to do all this! Firmata is one of them. This protocol establishes a serial communication format that allows you to read digital and analog inputs, as well as send information to digital and analog outputs.

The Arduino IDE includes ready-made sketches that will drive Arduino through Python with the Firmata protocol. On the PC side, there are implementations of the protocol in several languages, including Python. To get started with Firmata, let’s use it to implement a “Hello, World!” program.

Uploading the Firmata Sketch

Before you write your Python program to drive Arduino, you have to upload the Firmata sketch so that you can use that protocol to control the board. The sketch is available in the Arduino IDE’s built-in examples. To open it, access the File menu, then Examples, followed by Firmata, and finally StandardFirmata:

The sketch will be loaded into a new IDE window. To upload it to the Arduino, you can follow the same steps you did before:

  1. Plug the USB cable into the PC.
  2. Select the appropriate board and port on the IDE.
  3. Press Upload.

After the upload is finished, you won’t notice any activity on the Arduino. To control it, you still need a program that can communicate with the board through the serial connection. To work with the Firmata protocol in Python, you’ll need the pyFirmata package, which you can install with

pip

:


$ pip install pyfirmata

After the installation finishes, you can run an equivalent Blink application using Python and Firmata:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3 4board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 5 6while True: 7 board.digital[13].write(1) 8 time.sleep(1) 9 board.digital[13].write(0) 10 time.sleep(1)

Here’s how this program works. You import

pyfirmata

and use it to establish a serial connection with the Arduino board, which is represented by the

board

object in line 4. You also configure the port in this line by passing an argument to

pyfirmata.Arduino()

. You can use the Arduino IDE to find the port.


board.digital

is a list whose elements represent the digital pins of the Arduino. These elements have the methods

read()

and

write()

, which will read and write the state of the pins. Like most embedded device programs, this program mainly consists of an infinite loop:

  • In line 7, digital pin 13 is turned on, which turns the LED on for one second.
  • In line 9, this pin is turned off, which turns the LED off for one second.

Now that you know the basics of how to control an Arduino with Python, let’s go through some applications to interact with its inputs and outputs.

Reading Digital Inputs

Digital inputs can have only two possible values. In a circuit, each of these values is represented by a different voltage. The table below shows the digital input representation for a standard Arduino Uno board:

Value Level Voltage
Low 0V
High 5V

To control the LED, you’ll use a push button to send digital input values to the Arduino. The button should send 0V to the board when it’s released and 5V to the board when it’s pressed. The figure below shows how to connect the button to the Arduino board:

You may notice that the LED is connected to the Arduino on digital pin 13, just like before. Digital pin 10 is used as a digital input. To connect the push button, you have to use the 10 KOhm resistor, which acts as a pull down in this circuit. A pull down resistor ensures that the digital input gets 0V when the button is released.

When you release the button, you open the connection between the two wires on the button. Since there’s no current flowing through the resistor, pin 10 just connects to the ground (GND). The digital input gets 0V, which represents the 0 (or low) state. When you press the button, you apply 5V to both the resistor and the digital input. A current flows through the resistor and the digital input gets 5V, which represents the 1 (or high) state.

You can use a breadboard to assemble the above circuit as well:

Now that you’ve assembled the circuit, you have to run a program on the PC to control it using Firmata. This program will turn on the LED, based on the state of the push button:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3 4board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 5 6it = pyfirmata.util.Iterator(board) 7it.start() 8 9board.digital[10].mode = pyfirmata.INPUT 10 11while True: 12 sw = board.digital[10].read() 13 if sw is True: 14 board.digital[13].write(1) 15 else: 16 board.digital[13].write(0) 17 time.sleep(0.1)

Let’s walk through this program:

  • Lines 1 and 2 import

    pyfirmata

    and

    time

    .
  • Line 4 uses

    pyfirmata.Arduino()

    to set the connection with the Arduino board.
  • Line 6 assigns an iterator that will be used to read the status of the inputs of the circuit.
  • Line 7 starts the iterator, which keeps a loop running in parallel with your main code. The loop executes

    board.iterate()

    to update the input values obtained from the Arduino board.
  • Line 9 sets pin 10 as a digital input with

    pyfirmata.INPUT

    . This is necessary since the default configuration is to use digital pins as outputs.
  • Line 11 starts an infinite

    while

    loop. This loop reads the status of the input pin, stores it in

    sw

    , and uses this value to turn the LED on or off by changing the value of pin 13.
  • Line 17 waits 0.1 seconds between iterations of the

    while

    loop. This isn’t strictly necessary, but it’s a nice trick to avoid overloading the CPU, which reaches 100% load when there isn’t a wait command in the loop.


pyfirmata

also offers a more compact syntax to work with input and output pins. This may be a good option for when you’re working with several pins. You can rewrite the previous program to have more compact syntax:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3 4board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 5 6it = pyfirmata.util.Iterator(board) 7it.start() 8 9digital_input = board.get_pin('d:10:i') 10led = board.get_pin('d:13:o') 11 12while True: 13 sw = digital_input.read() 14 if sw is True: 15 led.write(1) 16 else: 17 led.write(0) 18 time.sleep(0.1)

In this version, you use

board.get_pin()

to create two objects.

digital_input

represents the digital input state, and

led

represents the LED state. When you run this method, you have to pass a string argument composed of three elements separated by colons:

  1. The type of the pin (for analog orfor digital)
  2. The number of the pin
  3. The mode of the pin (for input orfor output)

Since

digital_input

is a digital input using pin 10, you pass the argument

'd:10:i'

. The LED state is set to a digital output using pin 13, so the

led

argument is

'd:13:o'

.

When you use

board.get_pin()

, there’s no need to explicitly set up pin 10 as an input like you did before with

pyfirmata.INPUT

. After the pins are set, you can access the status of a digital input pin using

read()

, and set the status of a digital output pin with

write()

.

Digital inputs are widely used in electronics projects. Several sensors provide digital signals, like presence or door sensors, that can be used as inputs to your circuits. However, there are some cases where you’ll need to measure analog values, such as distance or physical quantities. In the next section, you’ll see how to read analog inputs using Arduino with Python.

Reading Analog Inputs

In contrast to digital inputs, which can only be on or off, analog inputs are used to read values in some range. On the Arduino Uno, the voltage to an analog input ranges from 0V to 5V. Appropriate sensors are used to measure physical quantities, such as distances. These sensors are responsible for encoding these physical quantities in the proper voltage range so they can be read by the Arduino.

To read an analog voltage, the Arduino uses an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which converts the input voltage to a digital number with a fixed number of bits. This determines the resolution of the conversion. The Arduino Uno uses a 10-bit ADC and can determine 1024 different voltage levels.

The voltage range for an analog input is encoded to numbers ranging from 0 to 1023. When 0V is applied, the Arduino encodes it to the number 0. When 5V is applied, the encoded number is 1023. All intermediate voltage values are proportionally encoded.

A potentiometer is a variable resistor that you can use to set the voltage applied to an Arduino analog input. You’ll connect it to an analog input to control the frequency of a blinking LED:

In this circuit, the LED is set up just as before. The end terminals of the potentiometer are connected to ground (GND) and 5V pins. This way, the central terminal (the cursor) can have any voltage in the 0V to 5V range depending on its position, which is connected to the Arduino on analog pin A0.

Using a breadboard, you can assemble this circuit as follows:

Before you control the LED, you can use the circuit to check the different values the Arduino reads, based on the position of the potentiometer. To do this, run the following program on your PC:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3 4board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 5it = pyfirmata.util.Iterator(board) 6it.start() 7 8analog_input = board.get_pin('a:0:i') 9 10while True: 11 analog_value = analog_input.read() 12 print(analog_value) 13 time.sleep(0.1)

In line 8, you set up

analog_input

as the analog A0 input pin with the argument

'a:0:i'

. Inside the infinite

while

loop, you read this value, store it in

analog_value

, and display the output to the console with

print()

. When you move the potentiometer while the program runs, you should output similar to this:


0.0 0.0293 0.1056 0.1838 0.2717 0.3705 0.4428 0.5064 0.5797 0.6315 0.6764 0.7243 0.7859 0.8446 0.9042 0.9677 1.0 1.0

The printed values change, ranging from 0 when the position of the potentiometer is on one end to 1 when it’s on the other end. Note that these are float values, which may require conversion depending on the application.

To change the frequency of the blinking LED, you can use the

analog_value

to control how long the LED will be kept on or off:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3 4board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 5it = pyfirmata.util.Iterator(board) 6it.start() 7 8analog_input = board.get_pin('a:0:i') 9led = board.get_pin('d:13:o') 10 11while True: 12 analog_value = analog_input.read() 13 if analog_value is not None: 14 delay = analog_value + 0.01 15 led.write(1) 16 time.sleep(delay) 17 led.write(0) 18 time.sleep(delay) 19 else: 20 time.sleep(0.1)

Here, you calculate

delay

as

analog_value + 0.01

to avoid having

delay

equal to zero. Otherwise, it’s common to get an

analog_value

of

None

during the first few iterations. To avoid getting an error when running the program, you use a conditional in line 13 to test whether

analog_value

is

None

. Then you control the period of the blinking LED.

Try running the program and changing the position of the potentiometer. You’ll notice the frequency of the blinking LED changes:

By now, you’ve seen how to use digital inputs, digital outputs, and analog inputs on your circuits. In the next section, you’ll see how to use analog outputs.

Using Analog Outputs

In some cases, it’s necessary to have an analog output to drive a device that requires an analog signal. Arduino doesn’t include a real analog output, one where the voltage could be set to any value in a certain range. However, Arduino does include several Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) outputs.

PWM is a modulation technique in which a digital output is used to generate a signal with variable power. To do this, it uses a digital signal of constant frequency, in which the duty cycle is changed according to the desired power. The duty cycle represents the fraction of the period in which the signal is set to high.

Not all Arduino digital pins can be used as PWM outputs. The ones that can be are identified by a tilde ():

Several devices are designed to be driven by PWM signals, including some motors. It’s even possible to obtain a real analog signal from the PWM signal if you use analog filters. In the previous example, you used a digital output to turn an LED light on or off. In this section, you’ll use PWM to control the brightness of an LED, according to the value of an analog input given by a potentiometer.

When a PWM signal is applied to an LED, its brightness varies according to the duty cycle of the PWM signal. You’re going to use the following circuit:

This circuit is identical to the one used in the previous section to test the analog input, except for one difference. Since it’s not possible to use PWM with pin 13, the digital output pin used for the LED is pin 11.

You can use a breadboard to assemble the circuit as follows:

With the circuit assembled, you can control the LED using PWM with the following program:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3 4board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 5 6it = pyfirmata.util.Iterator(board) 7it.start() 8 9analog_input = board.get_pin('a:0:i') 10led = board.get_pin('d:11:p') 11 12while True: 13 analog_value = analog_input.read() 14 if analog_value is not None: 15 led.write(analog_value) 16 time.sleep(0.1)

There are a few differences from the programs you’ve used previously:

  1. In line 10, you set

    led

    to PWM mode by passing the argument

    'd:11:p'

    .
  2. In line 15, you call

    led.write()

    with

    analog_value

    as an argument. This is a value between 0 and 1, read from the analog input.

Here you can see the LED behavior when the potentiometer is moved:

To show the changes in the duty cycle, an oscilloscope is plugged into pin 11. When the potentiometer is in its zero position, you can see the LED is turned off, as pin 11 has 0V on its output. As you turn the potentiometer, the LED gets brighter as the PWM duty cycle increases. When you turn the potentiometer all the way, the duty cycle reaches 100%. The LED is turned on continuously at maximum brightness.

With this example, you’ve covered the basics of using an Arduino and its digital and analog inputs and outputs. In the next section, you’ll see an application for using Arduino with Python to drive events on the PC.

Using a Sensor to Trigger a Notification

Firmata is a nice way to get started with Arduino with Python, but the need for a PC or other device to run the application can be costly, and this approach may not be practical in some cases. However, when it’s necessary to collect data and send it to a PC using external sensors, Arduino and Firmata make a good combination.

In this section, you’ll use a push button connected to your Arduino to mimic a digital sensor and trigger a notification on your machine. For a more practical application, you can think of the push button as a door sensor that will trigger an alarm notification, for example.

To display the notification on the PC, you’re going to use Tkinter, the standard Python GUI toolkit. This will show a message box when you press the button. For an in-depth intro to Tkinter, check out Python GUI Programming With Tkinter.

You’ll need to assemble the same circuit that you used in the digital input example:

After you assemble the circuit, use the following program to trigger the notifications:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3import tkinter 4from tkinter import messagebox 5 6root = tkinter.Tk() 7root.withdraw() 8 9board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 10 11it = pyfirmata.util.Iterator(board) 12it.start() 13 14digital_input = board.get_pin('d:10:i') 15led = board.get_pin('d:13:o') 16 17while True: 18 sw = digital_input.read() 19 if sw is True: 20 led.write(1) 21 messagebox.showinfo("Notification", "Button was pressed") 22 root.update() 23 led.write(0) 24 time.sleep(0.1)

This program is similar to the one used in the digital input example, with a few changes:

  • Lines 3 and 4 import libraries needed to set up Tkinter.
  • Line 6 creates Tkinter’s main window.
  • Line 7 tells Tkinter not to show the main window on the screen. For this example, you only need to see the message box.
  • Line 17 starts the

    while

    loop:

    1. When you press the button, the LED will turn on and

      messagebox.showinfo()

      displays a message box.
    2. The loop pauses until the user presses OK. This way, the LED remains on as long as the message is on the screen.
    3. After the user presses OK,

      root.update()

      clears the message box from the screen and the LED is turned off.
  • When you press the button, the LED will turn on and

To extend the notification example, you could even use the push button to send an email when pressed:


1import pyfirmata 2import time 3import smtplib 4import ssl 5 6def send_email(): 7 port = 465 # For SSL 8 smtp_server = "smtp.gmail.com" 9 sender_email = "

" 10 receiver_email = "

" 11 password = " " 12 message = """Subject: Arduino Notification\n The switch was turned on.""" 13 14 context = ssl.create_default_context() 15 with smtplib.SMTP_SSL(smtp_server, port, context=context) as server: 16 print("Sending email") 17 server.login(sender_email, password) 18 server.sendmail(sender_email, receiver_email, message) 19 20board = pyfirmata.Arduino('/dev/ttyACM0') 21 22it = pyfirmata.util.Iterator(board) 23it.start() 24 25digital_input = board.get_pin('d:10:i') 26 27while True: 28 sw = digital_input.read() 29 if sw is True: 30 send_email() 31 time.sleep(0.1)


You can learn more about

send_email()

in Sending Emails With Python. Here, you configure the function with email server credentials, which will be used to send the email.

Note: If you use a Gmail account to send the emails, then you need to enable the Allow less secure apps option. For more information on how to do this, check out Sending Emails With Python.

With these example applications, you’ve seen how to use Firmata to interact with more complex Python applications. Firmata lets you use any sensor attached to the Arduino to obtain data for your application. Then you can process the data and make decisions within the main application. You can even use Firmata to send data to Arduino outputs, controlling switches or PWM devices.

If you’re interested in using Firmata to interact with more complex applications, then try out some of these projects:

  • A temperature monitor to alert you when the temperature gets too high or low
  • An analog light sensor that can sense when a light bulb is burned out
  • A water sensor that can automatically turn on the sprinklers when the ground is too dry
How to use water level sensor with Arduino Uno.
How to use water level sensor with Arduino Uno.

Step 7: Going Forward 👨🏫👩💻👨🚀

  • You might not be able to run the code for a few use cases, but don’t worry, this link, for example, shows how much useful the Wokwi Simulator is for you https://wokwi.com/arduino/libraries
  • If you want to change the UNO to nano or Mega it is possible as well
  • You can define your own connections, position the peripherals in the way you want and much more
  • Please subscribe here: https://wokwi.com/arduino/libraries/Adafruit_NeoP…

other links which might interest you:

https://www.instructables.com/Best-Free-Online-Wok…

https://www.instructables.com/Web-Based-Arduino-Si…

https://www.instructables.com/Online-Arduino-Simul…

https://www.instructables.com/How-to-Simulate-Ardu…

https://www.instructables.com/Famous-Simon-Says-Ga…

https://www.instructables.com/How-to-Runtest-Your-…

We’ve always defined ourselves by the ability to overcome the impossible. And we count these moments. These moments when we dare to aim higher, to break barriers, to reach for the stars, to make the unknown known. We count these moments as our proudest achievements. But we lost all that. Or perhaps we’ve just forgotten that we are still pioneers. And we’ve barely begun. And that our greatest accomplishments cannot be behind us, because our destiny lies above us.

Getting Started with Arduino UNO

This document explains how to connect your Uno board to the computer and upload your first sketch. The Arduino Uno is programmed using the Arduino Software (IDE), our Integrated Development Environment common to all our boards and running both online and offline. For more information on how to get started with the Arduino Software visit the Getting Started page.

Use your Arduino Uno on the Arduino Web IDE

All Arduino boards, including this one, work out-of-the-box on the Arduino Web Editor, you only need to install Arduino Create Agent to get started.

The Arduino Web Editor is hosted online, therefore it will always be up-to-date with the latest features and support for all boards. Follow this simple guide to start coding on the browser and upload your sketches onto your board.

Use your Arduino Uno on the Arduino Desktop IDE

If you want to program your Arduino Uno while offline you need to install the Arduino Desktop IDE The Uno is programmed using the Arduino Software (IDE), our Integrated Development Environment common to all our boards. Before you can move on, you must have installed the Arduino Software (IDE) on your PC, as explained in the home page of our Getting Started.

Connect your Uno board with an A B USB cable; sometimes this cable is called a USB printer cable

The USB connection with the PC is necessary to program the board and not just to power it up. The Uno automatically draw power from either the USB or an external power supply. Connect the board to your computer using the USB cable. The green power LED (labelled PWR) should go on.

Install the board drivers

If you used the Installer, Windows – from XP up to 10 – will install drivers automatically as soon as you connect your board.

If you downloaded and expanded the Zip package or, for some reason, the board wasn’t properly recognized, please follow the procedure below.

  • Click on the Start Menu, and open up the Control Panel.

  • While in the Control Panel, navigate to System and Security. Next, click on System. Once the System window is up, open the Device Manager.

  • Look under Ports (COM & LPT). You should see an open port named “Arduino UNO (COMxx)”. If there is no COM & LPT section, look under “Other Devices” for “Unknown Device”.

  • Right click on the “Arduino UNO (COmxx)” port and choose the “Update Driver Software” option.

  • Next, choose the “Browse my computer for Driver software” option.

  • Finally, navigate to and select the driver file named “arduino.inf”, located in the “Drivers” folder of the Arduino Software download (not the “FTDI USB Drivers” sub-directory). If you are using an old version of the IDE (1.0.3 or older), choose the Uno driver file named “Arduino UNO.inf”

  • Windows will finish up the driver installation from there.

See also: step-by-step screenshots for installing the Uno under Windows XP.

Open your first sketch

Open the LED blink example sketch: File > Examples >01.Basics > Blink.

Select your board type and port

You’ll need to select the entry in the Tools > Board menu that corresponds to your Arduino board.

Select the serial device of the board from the Tools | Serial Port menu. This is likely to be COM3 or higher (COM1 and COM2 are usually reserved for hardware serial ports). To find out, you can disconnect your board and re-open the menu; the entry that disappears should be the Arduino board. Reconnect the board and select that serial port.

Upload the program

Now, simply click the “Upload” button in the environment. Wait a few seconds – you should see the RX and TX leds on the board flashing. If the upload is successful, the message “Done uploading.” will appear in the status bar.

A few seconds after the upload finishes, you should see the pin 13 (L) LED on the board start to blink (in orange). If it does, congratulations! You’ve gotten Arduino up-and-running. If you have problems, please see the troubleshooting suggestions.

Learn more on the Desktop IDE

See this tutorial for a generic guide on the Arduino IDE with a few more infos on the Preferences, the Board Manager, and the Library Manager.

Tutorials

Now that you have set up and programmed your Uno board, you may find inspiration in our Project Hub tutorial platform

or have a look to the tutorial pages that explain how to use the various features of your board.

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Very Basic Arduino Uno Board Testing

A very simple Arduino board test… LOL

Here is some very easy code to test a cheap Arduino board I just got from China via Aliexpress. I am still waiting on a about 30 more orders from Aliexpress for more Arduino stuff. This was the first order which made it here.

Code:

/*
Arduino test-code
This code is intended to be used for an easy introduction to the Arduino board.
The program reads data from 2 digital and 2 analog ports and prints the values to the monitor with a sampling speed of 1 Hz.
*/
int counter = 0, analog0, analog1; //Creates variables as integers
float analog0_volt, analog1_volt; //Creates variables as floating numbers.
boolean digital2, digital3; //Creates variables as boolean (HIGH or LOW, TRUE or FALSE)
void setup()
{ //Setup. This section runs only once.
Serial.begin(9600); //Sets the communication speed between PC and Arduino Uno to 9600 baud.
pinMode(2, INPUT); //Sets the digital 2 pin to input mode (High impedance).
pinMode(3, INPUT_PULLUP); //Sets the digital 2 pin to input mode with “Pull Up” (High impedance and Normal High).
delay(500); //0.5 seconds break.
} //end of setup
void loop()
{ //Loop. This section runs in an unending loop.
//Collect data from all the inputs
analog0 = analogRead(A0); //Reads data from analog port 0 and stores it in the variable “analog0”.
analog1 = analogRead(A1); //Reads data from analog port 1 and stores it in the variable “analog1”.
digital2 = digitalRead(2); //Reads data from digital port 2 and stores it in the variable “digital2”.
digital3 = digitalRead(3); //Reads data from digital port 3 and stores it in the variable “digital3”.
//Note the difference between pin numbering in analog (Ax) and digital (x).
//Convertion from digital value to voltage value
analog0_volt = ((float)analog0 / 1023) * 5; //Scales from 0-1023 (integers) to 0.0-5.0 (decimal numbers). 0=0V 1023=5V.
analog1_volt = (analog1 / 1023.0) * 5; //Does the same as the previous line. Notice the difference in the syntax.
//Print out data to the monitor
Serial.print(counter); //Prints out the variable “counter”.
Serial.print(” – Analog0: “); //Prints the text inside the brackets “__”.
Serial.print(analog0_volt); //Prints out the variable “analog0_volt”.
Serial.print(” Analog1: “); //Prints the text.
Serial.print(analog1_volt); //Prints out the variable “analog1_volt”.
Serial.print(” Digital2: “); //Prints the text.
Serial.print(digital2); //Prints out the variable “digital2″.
Serial.print(” Digital3: “); //Prints the text.
Serial.println(digital3); //Prints out the variable “digital3” and ends with a line shift.
delay(1000); //A 1000ms delay.
counter++; //Increments the variable “counter”.
} //end of function (Returns to start of loop).
//The program inside the loop function will continue forever and ever, or until power down.

Using the Arduino IDE on the mac I uploaded the code above into my new cheap Chinese Arduino board and set up a simple test before I get into some more interesting stuff.

Well, at least the board works, the Arduino IDE on my mac works, etc…..

Location: Asia Pacific, Cyberspace, in the Dark Dystopia

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Getting free of the Arduino IDE serial monitor, this python code works.

First, on the mac, import pyserial:

Code:

sudo pip install pyserial

Code:

macos# cat ard.py

The code:

Code:

import serial
ser = serial.Serial(
port=’/dev/cu.usbserial-40′,
baudrate=9600,
parity=serial.PARITY_NONE,
stopbits=serial.STOPBITS_ONE,
bytesize=serial.EIGHTBITS,
timeout=0)
print(“connected to: ” + ser.portstr)
# this will store the line
line = []
while True:
for c in ser.read():
line.append(c)
if c == ‘\n’:
print(“Line: ” + ”.join(line))
line = []
break
ser.close()

Run it:

Code:

python ard.py

Output from Arduino on my mac using python to read it:

Well, this is a bit too easy….. we all can easily set up all kind of sensors in our homes, in our motorcycles or cars, and push the results to a DB on the net and display the results on the web…. even on this site. Or M2M….

You can do some pretty rinky dink seasonal (Christmas) stuff with an Arduino and strips of LEDs like WS2812b (Google that).

You just need to connect a pin of the strip to 5V, another to GND, and a third to an output pin. I use the FastLED library.
You can program sequences of chasing lights, colour changes, and anything else that you want to do.

I had a problem recently in trying to get outputs (eg, LED flashing) at different frequencies (intervals)) given the single thread available on an Arduino. I got around this by using the modulo function. I’ll attach the demo code a wrote for this before I wrote the production stuff.

Also, I got hacked off with trying to program LED flashing (on analogue and/or digital output pins) a number of required times and also fading up or down at the same time. For example, fade a LED up, flash it 4 times, then fade it down. I thought that there had to be an easier way so I wrote “ulcf” (Universal LED Control Function) to allow me to call my requirements in one line of code (or perhaps 2 or 3 calls of the function to get the effect that I want). I’ll attach this code to this post too but I’m not saying it’s fully debugged but you’ll get the drift.

How many electronics engineers are there on this forum who mess about with the likes of Arduino? Show of hands please.

PS. Had to upload files as .txt – site refuses to upload .ino

Location: Asia Pacific, Cyberspace, in the Dark Dystopia

Posts: 19,118

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Quote:

Originally Posted by hicksd8

PS. Had to upload files as .txt – site refuses to upload .ino

FYI:

If you gzip the .ino file, you can upload it.

OBTW, I have a 5 meter strip of LED lights (red, blue, green) I got from Aliexpress for about $4 dollars, including an IR controller. I was thinking to plug the strip directly (omitting the IR controller that came with the strip) into an Arduino project for fun as well. It’s currently running off an old car battery on my balcony.

Ok, if you have an LED strip I can send you some code that I wrote for a SMET2 (in the UK that’s a Smart Electricity Meter that can be read remotely by the supplier) demonstration. The LED strip was 52 LED’s long and demonstrates the supplier sending out a meter read request (3 stages of LED strip light following) and the reverse to demonstrate the data coming back from the smart meter. It was used on a recent demo board at a renewable energy show. Anyway, it’s just a demo if you want the code. 52 LED strip (or longer) for full effect.

Here is a sketch to do basic testing for the Arduino UNO and the MLT-BT04.
This BLE module works with IOS (iPhone) and I’ll add some details on my IOS testing with an iPhone in a follow-up post.
For now, here is the basic BLE (HM-10) sketch for the Arduino UNO:
/*
Arduino test-code… (7 Replies)

Just finished a quick Python script to send the current unix time over to the Arduino from macOS, so in the absence of GPS or some other way to get the unix timestamp (epoch time) to the Arduino, I can get my macOS and Arduino UNO synced to within a second.
Normally, when the Arduino starts… (9 Replies)

Waiting for more fun Ardunio parts from AliExpress, I decided to test two cheap Chinese Arduino UNO clones.
The Arduino UNO R3 (CH340G) MEGA328P
The Wavgat UNO R3 (CH340G) MEGA328P
Both of these Chinese Ardunio clones sell for about $3 USD, delivered to your door.
The bottom line is… (0 Replies)

HI all…
(Apologies for any typos.)
To add to Neo’s Arduino subject matter I have decided to upload this in “.zip” format.
Ignore “*.info” files these are AMIGA icons only and also the “HAM” drawer as these are photos in ancient AMIGA HAM modes.
I have noticed that there are current… (6 Replies)

In my further exploration of Arduino, today I decided to install the arduino-cli on my mac today.
https://github.com/arduino/arduino-cli
I followed the instructions for macOS but when I got to this part:
arduino-cli board list
I got the dreaded “Unknown” Fully Qualified Board Name… (1 Reply)

I am working on a semi-auto detection idea for Arduino for the Scope project.
It does require a little user intervention but minimal.
It works by just responding to two on screen prompts to unplug and plug Arduino
into a USB port.
There are two versions and both work perfectly well and give… (3 Replies)

This is a very simple starter DEMO to access Arduino Diecimila Board for the
Macbook Pro 13″ OSX 10.7.5…
A potentiometer is connected between 5V and Gnd with the wiper connected to
ANALOG IN 0 on the Arduino. This was adjusted to give the Ms and Ls as seen…
I now have DC in for this… (0 Replies)

Hi all…
(Apologies for any typos at all.)
This is a step by step _script_ to check if your Arduino is talking to your Linux or Macbook Pro computer using the Terminal…
It works on at least 3 Linux flavours and now the Macbook Pro…
I hope you find it useful as a simple check for… (0 Replies)

Hướng dẫn lập trình Arduino cơ bản

Bài đăng này đã không được cập nhật trong 3 năm

Ở bài viết trước, mình đã giới thiệu qua về Arduino, ở bài biết này mình sẽ hướng dẫn các bạn cách lập trình Arduino cơ bản thông qua ví dụ cơ bản: Làm đèn LED tự động bật tắt sau một khoảng thời gian. Đầu tiên chúng ta hãy bắt đầu tìm hiểu về cấu trúc của một chương trình Arduino.

Cấu trúc chương trình Arduino

Cấu trúc ban đầu của chương trình trong Arduino IDE khá đơn giản, chỉ bao gồm hai hàm setup() và loop(). Khi chương trình bắt đầu chạy, những lệnh trong setup() sẽ được xử lý đầu tiên, ta thường dùng hàm này để khởi tạo trạng thái và giá trị của các biến hay các thông số trong chương trình.

Sau khi setup() chạy xong, những lệnh trong loop() được chạy. Đây là một vòng lặp vô tận, do đó các dòng code trong hàm này sẽ được lặp đi lặp lại liên tục cho tới khi nào bạn ngắt nguồn của board Arduino mới thôi hoặc can thiếp bằng nút Reset trên bảng mạch, chương trình của bạn sẽ trở về lại trạng thái như khi Arduino mới được cấp nguồn, tức là bắt đầu chạy lại từ hàm setup().

Quá trình này bạn có thể xem như hình dưới đây:

Tiếp đến ta sẽ thử lập trình Arduino thông qua ví dụ cơ bản: Làm đèn LED tự động bật tắt sau một khoảng thời gian, để làm được ví dụ này, ta cần chuẩn bị một số phần cứng cần thiết.

Tạo LED tự động bật tắt sau một khoảng thời gian

Step 2: HEX FILES:

A HEX file is a hexadecimal source file typically used by programmable logic devices, such as microcontrollers in remote controls, office machines, and automobile engine control systems. It contains settings, configuration information, or other data saved in a hexadecimal format. This has one advantage over language code files that it cannot be edited until or unless you have the original language file code. Here I have a hex file in comparison with original file.

So, a user can use your file to make the project but cannot add anything extra to the program to make any changes in the overall projects. Even the assigned values and pin numbers can not be changed.

8x8x8 LED CUBE WITH ARDUINO UNO
8x8x8 LED CUBE WITH ARDUINO UNO

Further Reading

Now that you know the basics of controlling Arduino with Python, you can start working on more complex applications. There are several tutorials that can help you develop integrated projects. Here are a few ideas:

  • REST APIs: These are widely used to integrate different applications. You could use REST with Arduino to build APIs that get information from sensors and send commands to actuators. To learn about REST APIs, check out Python REST APIs With Flask, Connexion, and SQLAlchemy.

  • Alternate GUIs: In this tutorial, you used Tkinter to build a graphical application. However, there are other graphical libraries for desktop applications. To see an alternative, check out How to Build a Python GUI Application With wxPython.

  • Threading: The infinite


    while

    loop that you used in this tutorial is a very common feature of Arduino applications. However, using a thread to run the main loop will allow you to execute other tasks concurrently. To learn how to use threads, check out An Intro to Threading in Python.

  • Face Detection: It’s common for IoT apps to integrate machine learning and computer vision algorithms. With these, you could build an alarm that triggers a notification when it detects faces on a camera, for example. To learn more about facial recognition systems, check out Traditional Face Detection With Python.

Lastly, there are other ways of using Python in microcontrollers besides Firmata and Arduino:

  • pySerial: Arduino Uno cannot run Python directly, but you could design your own Arduino sketch and use pySerial to establish a serial connection. Then you can control Arduino with Python using your own protocol.

  • MicroPython: If you’re interested in running Python directly on a microcontroller, then check out the MicroPython project. It provides an efficient implementation of Python to be executed on some microcontrollers such as the ESP8266 and ESP32.

  • SBCs: Another option is to use a single board computer (SBC) such as a Raspberry Pi to run Python. SBCs are complete, Arduino-sized computers that can run a Linux-based operating system, allowing you to use vanilla Python. As most SBCs provide General-purpose input and output pins, you can use it to replace an Arduino on most applications.

Watch Now This tutorial has a related video course created by the Real Python team. Watch it together with the written tutorial to deepen your understanding: Arduino With Python: How to Get Started

Testing the Arduino Uno Board

To verify that you are receiving correct data you can test it by setting each channel to ground and power and read the output in the Serial Monitor. To do this you need a wire to connect between the input connectors and power connectors on the Arduino Uno board.

  • Connect one end of the wire to A0 port
  • Connect the other end to GND port
  • Analog0 in the Serial Monitor should now read 0.0 volts
  • Remove the wire from GND and connect it to 5V
  • Analog0 should now read approximately 5.0 volts
  • Remove the wire from 5V and connect it to 3.3V
  • Analog0 should now read approximately 3.3 volts
  • Repeat the same procedure with A1, D2 and D3
  • Do you get the same value from the digital port in both 3.3V and 5V?
How to use RFID with Arduino | How to use the RC522 RFID module with an Arduino - Tutorial
How to use RFID with Arduino | How to use the RC522 RFID module with an Arduino – Tutorial

Step 3: How to Test Your Arduino Servo Motor Code Online?

Servo Motors are intelligent motors which can understand the angle of rotation based on the PWM width we drive with. They have built-in comparators which compared the width of the PWM and then act accordingly. They are used in robotics, pick and place and many such examples. These are definitely of interest to hobbyists. In this step, we can see how one can play with Arduino Servo motor simulations as well as test their own code online for free 😃

  • Go to

https://wokwi.com/playground/servo

  • Copy the servo motor code you want to test. Let me also take a random code from the internet

This is the code from

Here is the code from Arduino Stackexchange- just random:

#include Servo myservo; // create servo object to control a servo // a maximum of eight servo objects can be created

int pos = 0; // variable to store the servo position

void setup() { myservo.attach(9); // attaches the servo on pin 9 to the servo object }

void loop() { for(pos = 0; pos < 90; pos += 1) // goes from 0 degrees to 180 degrees { // in steps of 1 degree myservo.write(pos); // tell servo to go to position in variable ‘pos’ delay(15); // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position } for(pos = 90; pos>=1; pos-=1) // goes from 180 degrees to 0 degrees { myservo.write(pos); // tell servo to go to position in variable ‘pos’ delay(15); // waits 15ms for the servo to reach the position } }

  • The copied code is pasted into the editor field of the shared link
  • The RUN code button was pressed.

    • Note that it will take some time to compile one time (in a few seconds). If you stop and rerun it will be instant.
  • Play with the simulations as long as you want.
  • Here is the screenshot of the Arduino Servo motor code in action 🙂

Please leave a comment if you have any questions.😀

Phần cứng cần thiết

  • 1 mạch Arduino Uno R3 bao gồm dây nối USB với máy tính ( Không thật sự bắt buộc phải là con Arduino này, bạn có thể thay thế bằng bất kỳ dòng Arduino khác cũng được, nhưng phải xem lại sơ đồ chân của nó )
  • 01 đèn LED màu bất kỳ ( trên thị trường có bản 3mm hoặc 5mm, bản nào cũng được, 5mm thì sáng hơn )
  • 01 điện trở 220 Ohm
  • Dây đấu nối
How to get Code back from Arduino || Arduino se code kaise nikale || Get hex file back from Arduino
How to get Code back from Arduino || Arduino se code kaise nikale || Get hex file back from Arduino

Step 5: Software to Pull Back the Code

Now Download and install AVRDUDESS program flashing software from here.

Open the software and select the programmer as Arduino, select your Arduino port and set the baud rate to 19200.

Now click on detect, it will automatically detect the microcontroller.

Set the fuse bits by reading, copy/paste them in a notepad file for future. These will help to upload the program correctly in the microcontroller.

Sơ đồ lắp đặt

Trên sơ đồ lặp đặt trên mình đấu chân âm cửa đèn LED với chân GND của mạch ( hay còn gọi nối đất ), chân dương LED nối với chân pin 8 thông qua một điện trở. Chú ý thêm cách phân biệt chân dương và âm của LED, như hình bạn sẽ thấy chân dương bị cong còn chân âm sẽ thẳng, nhưng khi bạn mua mới về thì sẽ thấy hai chân đều thẳng, khi đó chân nào dài hơn sẽ là chân dương. Với điện trở, ta không cần quan tâm đầu âm và đầu dương.

Với đấu nối với Arduino, ở đây mình sử dụng chân pin 8, bạn có thể dùng bất kỳ chân nào khác từ 0 đến 13 đều được không có gì khác biệt cả, chỉ khác khi ta lập trình.

Sau khi đấu nối xong, bạn sử dụng dây USB để kết nối Arduino với máy tính để ta tiến hành nạp code, ( hoặc nếu thích thì nạp code cho Arduino rồi đấu nối sau, không sao cả )

HOW TO UPLOAD PROGRAM ON ARDUINO | ERROR SOLUTION:PROGRAM UPLOADING TO BOARD|  SKETCH UPLOAD ISSUE
HOW TO UPLOAD PROGRAM ON ARDUINO | ERROR SOLUTION:PROGRAM UPLOADING TO BOARD| SKETCH UPLOAD ISSUE

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What Is An Arduino? – Sparkfun Learn
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